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  1. Stoodley Pike Monument

    Todmorden

    Stoodley Pike Monument

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The...

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The monument was designed in 1854 by local architect James Green, and completed in 1856 at the end of the Crimean War.

    The monument replaced an earlier structure, commemorating the defeat of Napoleon and the surrender of Paris. It was completed in 1815, after the Battle of Waterloo, but collapsed in 1854 after decades of weathering and a lightning strike.

    You can only reach the Pike on foot, as there is no vehicular or bicycle access to the monument. Stoodley Pike is accessible by well-defined Right of Way footpaths. The Pennine Way also passes Stoodley Pike. There are many walking routes to the Pike from Todmorden, Hebden Bridge and Mytholmroyd. Walking guides to all these routes available from local Visitor Centres and the Heart of the Pennines online shop.

    Stoodley Pike Monument contains a spiral staircase of 39 steps, accessed from its north side. If you visit, please be aware that several of the internal steps are in darkness, so it’s useful to have a torch to light your way, as there are no windows. The entrance to the balcony is on the Monument’s west face, some 40 feet above ground level. The views are well worth the walk and the climb!

  2. The Buttress

    Hebden Bridge

    The Buttress

    Part of an ancient packhorse route, the Buttress offers a steep, cobbled ascent from the market town of Hebden Bridge to the village of Heptonstall...
    Part of an ancient packhorse route, the Buttress offers a steep, cobbled ascent from the market town of Hebden Bridge to the village of Heptonstall, set atop the hillside hundreds of feet above Hebden Bridge. Although less than a mile in distance, the ascent is quite challenging due to its steep and cobbled nature. However, this does not deter dozens of enthusiastic cyclists from riding up to the top in the annual 'Up the Buttress' hill cycle challenge. The Buttress can also be tackled in a more leisurely fashion and is suitable for walking. Suitable footwear is recommended as the cobbles can be a little slippy when wet. The Buttress begins its ascent from Hebden Bridge just off Old Gate/ Royd Terrace. If you cross the Packhorse Bridge from Bridge Gate, then you will see the cobbles of the Buttress to you left. almost opposite Hangingroyd Lane on your right.
  3. The Pennine Way

    Todmorden

    The Pennine Way

    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of England and offers 268 miles of the ...
    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of England and offers 268 miles of the finest upland walking in England. A once in a lifetime experience. The Pennine Way enters Calderdale at Blackstone Edge, passing Stoodley Pike, dropping down into the valley at Callis, climbing back up to Colden and over the moors to Widdop. Walkers often say this stretch of over 20 miles is one of the best on the whole route. The Trail is very well way-marked and there are some great views from the route (especially from the iconic Stoodley Pike). If you want to detour into Hebden Bridge on your way, you can use the Hebden Bridge Loop path developed in 2015.
  4. eptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Heptonstall

    Heptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One...
    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One of the first octagonal chapels, it is one of the oldest Methodist churches in continuous use today. This unusual octagonal chapel is open every day. It’s tucked away at the bottom of a flight of steps off Northgate. Entry is free, with donations to the upkeep of the Chapel welcome. The chapel's senior steward, Margaret Coupe, can be contacted on 01422 842550 or at margaret.coupe12@mypostoffice.co.uk Methodism in Heptonstall began with the firebrand Scot William Darney. He founded many societies on both sides of the Pennines as he travelled, preaching as he went. The Heptonstall “Darney Society” was visited by Charles and John Wesley in 1747. In these early days, Heptonstall had a preacher every sixth Sunday, with the travelling preachers receiving no stipend or allowance, eating where they could. John Wesley continued to visit Heptonstall and there were always immense crowds to hear him. The society was so successful it was decided to build a chapel. The octagon shape was then fashionable for Methodist preaching houses, as it avoided conflict with the established church. The building was finished in 1764. It was intended to hold 200 people, but by 1802 there were 337 members and over 1000 scholars. The solution was to knock down the far end of the chapel, lengthen the walls and rebuild it, preserving its octagonal shape. Heptonstall is located on The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route that circles the borough of Calderdale. Please call in to visit the Chapel if you're passing by.
  5. Dies used By the Cragg Vale Coiners

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Coiners

    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's a...
    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's activities were said to be so damaging that they threatened to wreck Britain's currency. David Hartley learnt his trade as an ironworker in Birmingham, before getting into trouble and moving back to Mytholmroyd to escape the authorities. Once returned to his home at Bell House farmhouse (which is now a bed & breakfast accommodation with educational facilities) David used ironworking as a cover to clip or file the edges from gold coins, milling the edges back so the change was all but unnoticeable, and making counterfeit coins from the shavings whilst returning the clipped coins into circulation. David’s activities soon spread to other farms, with families at nearby Hill Top Farm and Keelham Farm soon becoming involved; forming the beginnings of the gang of Cragg Vale Coiners. Local publicans also helped by placing the counterfeit coins into circulation. David Hartley seems to have been an enigmatic leader, becoming known as 'King David' Hartley and the gang’s numbers grew considerably until well over 30 individuals were involved. Rumours of the gang's activities reached the authorities, who sent an excise man named William Deighton to investigate. One of the coiners turned King’s Evidence and betrayed the gang, leading to Hartley's arrest at an Inn in Halifax on 14th October 1769. Hartley's brother Isaac offered £100 to anybody who would kill Deighton. It is alleged that the plotters planned Deighton's murder at an Inn in Mytholmroyd called Barbary's, which is now gone, but was located on the opposite side of the road to the present day Dusty Miller. On November 10th 1769 at Bull Close Lane near Halifax, Deighton was approached by two men, Matthew Normanton and Robert Thomas. Deighton was shot dead, his body also showing signs of having been stamped on. Just days later, the Government offered a reward of £100 for information leading to the arrest of the murderers and a pardon for anybody, bar the killers, who would turn King's Evidence. Over 30 people were subsequently arrested, including 'King David' Hartley, who was sentenced to death on April 6th 1770 and hanged at Tynburn, near York, on April 28th. His body is buried in the graveyard of the village of Heptonstall, above Hebden Bridge. Robert Thomas was acquitted of Deighton's murder, but was later hanged in 1774 for being a highwayman. Matthew Normanton initially fled the authorities, but was later caught and hanged in 1775. Isaac Hartley was never brought to trial due to a lack of evidence and died in 1815, aged 78. Heptonstall Museum has on display some of the original dies used by the Coiners to stamp their gold discs into coins, as well as panels telling more of their story.
  6. Spogs and Spice

    Halifax

    Spogs and Spice

    Take a trip down memory lane with Spogs & Spice, a sweet shop that is just as you remember from your childhood. Step inside and be transported b...
    Take a trip down memory lane with Spogs & Spice, a sweet shop that is just as you remember from your childhood. Step inside and be transported back in time as the delicious smells of your favourite sweets guide you around the traditional shop. The shelves are stacked with jars of Pear Drops, Cinder Toffee, Strawberry Laces, Sherbet Lemons, Midget Gems, Chocolate Limes and more, with a pick 'n' mix selection, locally made fudge and an American candy range to really get those tastebuds tingling. For those special occasions, Spogs & Spice offer personalised sweet gifts and favours including their best-selling personalised Love Hearts.
  7. The Piece Hall, Halifax by Paul White

    Halifax

    The Piece Hall

    The Piece Hall is unique. A Grade I listed Georgian masterpiece and the oldest remaining cloth hall in Britain.

    Following a multi-millio...

    The Piece Hall is unique. A Grade I listed Georgian masterpiece and the oldest remaining cloth hall in Britain.

    Following a multi-million pound transformation project, Britain's magnificent and last surviving cloth hall is ready to welcome visitors again.

    The Grade I listed structure has stood at the heart of Halifax since 1779 and has now re-opened as a world class cultural, heritage and leisure destination.

    The huge open-air courtyard is surrounded by a mix of independent bars, restaurants, cafes, galleries and shops. The stories of Georgian Halifax are told in the specially created exhibition spaces, while the central courtyard plays host to a year-round events programme of music, dance, film and spectacle for up to 7,500 people at a time.

    Click here to watch a short video about the reopening of The Piece Hall

  8. Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax

    Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnific...
    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnificent 180ft tower and spire which is enriched with sculpture. Free guided tours of Halifax Town Hall can be arranged to help you learn more about its fascinating history. Please contact the Mayor's Office on 01422 393022.
  9. Christ Church, Sowerby Bridge

    Sowerby Bridge

    Christ Church, Sowerby Bridge

    Christ Church is the Parish Church of Sowerby Bridge in the Diocese of West Yorkshire and the Dales. It is a warm and welcoming place to visit and ...
    Christ Church is the Parish Church of Sowerby Bridge in the Diocese of West Yorkshire and the Dales. It is a warm and welcoming place to visit and and worship, There are regular services during the week, and plenty of other other activities too. The church is open on a Tuesday and Saturday from 10am till 11:30am for visitors to have a look around and at other times by appointment.
  10. Loafers

    Halifax

    Loafers

    Selling new and used vinyl records amongst iconic artwork, influenced by seminal bands, their gigs and albums. Loafers is a haven for music lovers....
    Selling new and used vinyl records amongst iconic artwork, influenced by seminal bands, their gigs and albums. Loafers is a haven for music lovers. Owner Mark Richardson, a long-time lover of vinyl records, offers a wide range of genres to browse, with a selection of the more obscure sounds that can be found in the record rack titled ‘otherness.’ Mark also serves locally roasted and hand brewed Darkwoods Coffee, tea and soft drinks..
  11. Innovation at Hebden Bridge Mill

    Hebden Bridge

    Innovation at Hebden Bridge Mill

    Welcome to Hebden Bridge mill, a building which has stood at the centre of this town, even before there was a town! The Mill is home to Innovation ...
    Welcome to Hebden Bridge mill, a building which has stood at the centre of this town, even before there was a town! The Mill is home to Innovation Shop & Cafe-Bar. We invite you to visit us, to enjoy the wonderful ambience of this historic building. This principle of environmental sustainability characterises our entire business, with a wide range ethically sourced goods available in our shop, wholesome locally sourced food in the café and all our energy generated on site from fully renewable sources.
  12. Clay House

    Greetland

    Clay House

    Clay House is a Jacobean building, a fine example of seventeenth century vernacular architecture, located within a beautiful rural park in the vil...
    Clay House is a Jacobean building, a fine example of seventeenth century vernacular architecture, located within a beautiful rural park in the village of West Vale, less than a mile form Elland and less than three miles from Halifax. Clay House is the official start (and end) point for The Calderdale Way, a 50-mile walking route that circles the borough of Calderdale. The start of The Calderdale Way is signposted at the rear of the House, with signage, flower beds and a picnic area. The Main hall (7.3m x 10.5m) is a beautiful room with wood panelling, a minstrel gallery, polished wood floor, large stone fireplace and stone mullioned windows. It is licensed for civil ceremonies and can set up to 70 people for a formal meal, or 100 people theatre style for meetings, training sessions or presentations. Terraces and gardens in front and to the side of the House make great backgrounds for photographs and places to enjoy the views across the Park. Access Information: A portable ramp is provided to the front entrance or there is level access to the side; Two small internal ramps enable access to all public areas; A disabled toilet is available The Main Hall is fitted with an Induction Loop.
  13. Mystical and Magical

    Halifax

    Mystical and Magical

    A new age venture for a new age of The Piece Hall. John & Kevin have spent more than 12 years developing Mystical and Magical as an online store, b...
    A new age venture for a new age of The Piece Hall. John & Kevin have spent more than 12 years developing Mystical and Magical as an online store, building a reputation for quality and exemplary service. Now at The Piece Hall they offer an eclectic mix of ethical, fairly traded cultural, artisan and bohemian items. Gifts, jewellery and ephemeral products include a wide range of fine fragrant incense, aromatherapy essential oils, colourful dreamcatchers, Celtic/Gothic homewares and other inspirational objects.
  14. Calderdale Industrial Museum, Halifax

    Halifax

    Calderdale Industrial Museum

    The Calderdale Industrial Museum in Halifax is open to the public! You can visit each Saturday from 10am - 4pm, last entry 3.30pm. The Museum h...
    The Calderdale Industrial Museum in Halifax is open to the public! You can visit each Saturday from 10am - 4pm, last entry 3.30pm. The Museum houses a collection of industrial machinery and artifacts over four floors. Some of the machines are the only surviving examples in the country and have been placed in settings to give a close representation to the time when they were fully operational in the not too distant past. Down in the basement, the oil engine ‘Sadie’ provides motive power for part of an extensive collection of locally-manufactured machine tools, including lathes, drills and planers. You can take in the experience of nineteenth century Mytholm Coal Mine, learn about stone extraction and the exploitation of clay in the fireclay industries. The Power Gallery on the ground floor illustrates the story of power generation, from the water wheel to the internal combustion engine, by way of steam and electricity. The availability of power, initially from the numerous well-fed streams throughout Calderdale, was key to the growth of local industry. The first floor displays products that were made in Calderdale. World-famous names such as Mackintosh’s Toffees and Crossley’s carpets were everyday brands originating in Halifax. The top floor is still to be renovated and will be opened progressively over the next few years. The objective is to develop and present the story of how worsted cloth is manufactured from sheep’s wool. The Museum is operated by the Calderdale Industrial Museum Association (CIMA). a registered charity and dedicated group of enthusiastic volunteers. A great opportunity to witness the rise of the Industrial Revolution in the Calder Valley! Adults: £5 Concessions (senior citizens & students): £4 Accompanied Children aged up to 16: FREE
  15. Halifax Music Heritage Trail

    Halifax

    Halifax Music Heritage Trail

    Halifax has a surprising and quite amazing music history. From Dusty Springfield, Rod Stewart, Iggy Pop to Joy Division, Pulp, The Cure, The Jackso...
    Halifax has a surprising and quite amazing music history. From Dusty Springfield, Rod Stewart, Iggy Pop to Joy Division, Pulp, The Cure, The Jacksons, the list of artists who have played the town is long and diverse. The Halifax Music Heritage Trail, created by Michael Ainsworth and Trevor Simpson, celebrates this important cultural history of our town.
  16. Brown Paper Packages

    Halifax

    Brown Paper Packages

    Brown Paper Packages is an inviting shop stocking a wide range of gifts and crafts for the home focusing on local and national artisans. Home in...
    Brown Paper Packages is an inviting shop stocking a wide range of gifts and crafts for the home focusing on local and national artisans. Home interior accessories include cushions, candles and throws and locally made crafted items of fused glass, turned wood, memo boards and lampshapes. There's also a beautiful selection of handicraft items for home crafts, including ribbons, buttons and lace.

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