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  1. Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax

    Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnific...
    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnificent 180ft tower and spire which is enriched with sculpture. Free guided tours of Halifax Town Hall can be arranged to help you learn more about its fascinating history. Please contact the Mayor's Office on 01422 393022.
  2. Ted Hughes

    Mytholmroyd

    Ted Hughes

    Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was born at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, on the 17th August 1930. He lived there unti...

    Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was born at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, on the 17th August 1930. He lived there until he was seven, when his family moved to Mexborough. During his childhood he spent many hours exploring the countryside around Mytholmroyd, and these experiences and the influences of the landscape on him were to inform much of his later poetry.

    One of the greatest poets of his generation, Hughes also wrote stories, plays, reviews and essays. He translated the work of, amongst others, Ovid, Racine, Aeschylus and Euripides. He wrote extensively for children, including the story The Iron Man, which was turned into the Disney blockbuster The Iron Giant. Hughes's interests in other art forms led to many collaborations, most famously with the artist Leonard Baskin.

    Although best known in the UK, Hughes was a writer of international standing. He won numerous awards throughout his career, including four for his final collection, Birthday Letters. Hughes became Poet Laureate in 1984 until his death on 28th October 1998.

  3. The Yorkshire Gallery

    Halifax

    The Yorkshire Gallery

    The Yorkshire Gallery is a warm and inviting independent contemporary gallery. It's a family run business that is really passionate about Yorksh...
    The Yorkshire Gallery is a warm and inviting independent contemporary gallery. It's a family run business that is really passionate about Yorkshire and proud to showcase work by artists/designers & makers that have connections with our wonderful county. Supporting and nurturing established artists and those just graduating, The Yorkshire Gallery showcase their work in a carefully curated space with a regular programme of exhibitions that reflects their passion for fine art, contemporary jewellery and engaging craft.
  4. Innovation at Hebden Bridge Mill

    Hebden Bridge

    Innovation at Hebden Bridge Mill

    Welcome to Hebden Bridge mill, a building which has stood at the centre of this town, even before there was a town! The Mill is home to Innovation ...
    Welcome to Hebden Bridge mill, a building which has stood at the centre of this town, even before there was a town! The Mill is home to Innovation Shop & Cafe-Bar. We invite you to visit us, to enjoy the wonderful ambience of this historic building. This principle of environmental sustainability characterises our entire business, with a wide range ethically sourced goods available in our shop, wholesome locally sourced food in the café and all our energy generated on site from fully renewable sources.
  5. Onlineauthentic

    Halifax

    Onlineauthentic

    OnlineAuthentic specialise in memorabilia sales, event management, celebrity signings, guest speaker management, auctions, fundraising and charity ...
    OnlineAuthentic specialise in memorabilia sales, event management, celebrity signings, guest speaker management, auctions, fundraising and charity events. They guarantee authenticity of all memorabilia, proven by a unique certificate of authenticity with every item.
  6. Calderdale Industrial Museum, Halifax

    Halifax

    Calderdale Industrial Museum

    The Calderdale Industrial Museum in Halifax is open to the public! You can visit each Saturday from 10am - 4pm, last entry 3.30pm. The Museum h...
    The Calderdale Industrial Museum in Halifax is open to the public! You can visit each Saturday from 10am - 4pm, last entry 3.30pm. The Museum houses a collection of industrial machinery and artifacts over four floors. Some of the machines are the only surviving examples in the country and have been placed in settings to give a close representation to the time when they were fully operational in the not too distant past. Down in the basement, the oil engine ‘Sadie’ provides motive power for part of an extensive collection of locally-manufactured machine tools, including lathes, drills and planers. You can take in the experience of nineteenth century Mytholm Coal Mine, learn about stone extraction and the exploitation of clay in the fireclay industries. The Power Gallery on the ground floor illustrates the story of power generation, from the water wheel to the internal combustion engine, by way of steam and electricity. The availability of power, initially from the numerous well-fed streams throughout Calderdale, was key to the growth of local industry. The first floor displays products that were made in Calderdale. World-famous names such as Mackintosh’s Toffees and Crossley’s carpets were everyday brands originating in Halifax. The top floor is still to be renovated and will be opened progressively over the next few years. The objective is to develop and present the story of how worsted cloth is manufactured from sheep’s wool. The Museum is operated by the Calderdale Industrial Museum Association (CIMA). a registered charity and dedicated group of enthusiastic volunteers. A great opportunity to witness the rise of the Industrial Revolution in the Calder Valley! Adults: £5 Concessions (senior citizens & students): £4 Accompanied Children aged up to 16: FREE
  7. Hali-Facts Trail front page

    Halifax

    Hali-Facts Heritage Discovery Trail

    This Heritage Discovery Trail has been designed for children and families, but will be enjoyed by people of all ages. It will take you on a walking...
    This Heritage Discovery Trail has been designed for children and families, but will be enjoyed by people of all ages. It will take you on a walking tour around Halifax town centre, asking you to use your detective skills of observation, thinking, note-taking and sketching as you go. You can complete the Discovery Trail in a way that suits you. It can be done in ‘bite-size’ chunks over several visits or if you are feeling brave and have a lot of energy, you can try it all in one go! Many of the tasks can be completed by looking at the outsides of the buildings but sometimes, you will be invited to pop indoors to have a search around. Please check the opening times for each building that allows this – details are on their websites which are listed throughout the booklet. As far as is reasonably practicable, each building on this Discovery Trail provides a standard of access for disabled people equal to that enjoyed by the rest of the public.
  8. Walking in Calderdale

    Across Calderdale

    Walking in Calderdale

    The stunning landscapes of Calderdale offer walks that are suitable for all ages and abilities. There’s n...

    The stunning landscapes of Calderdale offer walks that are suitable for all ages and abilities. There’s no better way to immerse yourself and discover more about this beautiful area than on foot.

    Read our Walking in Calderdale blog post for information aboiut guided walks, E Trails, walking guides, easy & family walking and ideas for great walking routes to follow, such as The Calderdale Way, the Pennine Way & Hebden Bridge Loop, Todmorden Centenary Way and great walks at Hardcastle Crags, Ogden Water and more!

  9. Al's-Emporium

    Halifax

    Al's Emporium

    West Yorkshire family-run business, Al’s Emporium, sells antique, retro & vintage style furniture and collectables. They also support local artists...
    West Yorkshire family-run business, Al’s Emporium, sells antique, retro & vintage style furniture and collectables. They also support local artists and “wannabe Lord Sugars” by renting out glass display cabinets, showcasing handmade crafts, collectables, antiques, militaria, art and the weird & wonderful. There is always an eclectic mix of different items at Al’s Emporium to suit all pockets and tastes. Al’s Emporium has moved to The Piece Hall from a high street shop in the market town of Todmorden to concentrate on promoting their smaller items of vintage & antique furniture and collectables. Al’s Emporium gained its name from a long standing family joke, at the expense of its owner, Alan Sargent, part of the husband and wife team who own the family business. It was the nickname given to Alan’s storage unit which family and friends referred to as “Al’s Emporium” because of the amount of items stored in it. Alan and Simone are working towards Al’s Emporium becoming a “must-go-to” shop at The Piece Hall where customers will always receive a first class service and a warm Yorkshire welcome.
  10. Todmorden Town Hall

    Todmorden

    Todmorden Town Hall

    Todmorden Town Hall is a fantastic Grade 1 listed building. Visit take a tour, attend an open day or hire the space and be amazed by the architect...
    Todmorden Town Hall is a fantastic Grade 1 listed building. Visit take a tour, attend an open day or hire the space and be amazed by the architecture. The Grade 1 listed building is home to: • An impressive ballroom • Magistrate’s Court, now Todmorden Town Council Chamber • Grand staircase • Heritage Centre For a look inside please follow the hyperlink to the GillGraphics website below.
  11. Harveys of Halifax: Piece Hall

    Halifax

    Harveys of Halifax: Piece Hall

    Harveys are almost 100 years old and have been trading as a family run independent department store in Halifax for over 65 years. Their Piece H...
    Harveys are almost 100 years old and have been trading as a family run independent department store in Halifax for over 65 years. Their Piece Hall store is dedicated to stocking homeware items from the very best brands including Alessi, Emma Bridgewater, Joules Homeware and Orla Kiely.
  12. Stoodley Pike Monument

    Todmorden

    Stoodley Pike Monument

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The...

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The monument was designed in 1854 by local architect James Green, and completed in 1856 at the end of the Crimean War.

    The monument replaced an earlier structure, commemorating the defeat of Napoleon and the surrender of Paris. It was completed in 1815, after the Battle of Waterloo, but collapsed in 1854 after decades of weathering and a lightning strike.

    You can only reach the Pike on foot, as there is no vehicular or bicycle access to the monument. Stoodley Pike is accessible by well-defined Right of Way footpaths. The Pennine Way also passes Stoodley Pike. There are many walking routes to the Pike from Todmorden, Hebden Bridge and Mytholmroyd. Walking guides to all these routes available from local Visitor Centres and the Heart of the Pennines online shop.

    Stoodley Pike Monument contains a spiral staircase of 39 steps, accessed from its north side. If you visit, please be aware that several of the internal steps are in darkness, so it’s useful to have a torch to light your way, as there are no windows. The entrance to the balcony is on the Monument’s west face, some 40 feet above ground level. The views are well worth the walk and the climb!

  13. The Buttress

    Hebden Bridge

    The Buttress

    Part of an ancient packhorse route, the Buttress offers a steep, cobbled ascent from the market town of Hebden Bridge to the village of Heptonstall...
    Part of an ancient packhorse route, the Buttress offers a steep, cobbled ascent from the market town of Hebden Bridge to the village of Heptonstall, set atop the hillside hundreds of feet above Hebden Bridge. Although less than a mile in distance, the ascent is quite challenging due to its steep and cobbled nature. However, this does not deter dozens of enthusiastic cyclists from riding up to the top in the annual 'Up the Buttress' hill cycle challenge. The Buttress can also be tackled in a more leisurely fashion and is suitable for walking. Suitable footwear is recommended as the cobbles can be a little slippy when wet. The Buttress begins its ascent from Hebden Bridge just off Old Gate/ Royd Terrace. If you cross the Packhorse Bridge from Bridge Gate, then you will see the cobbles of the Buttress to you left. almost opposite Hangingroyd Lane on your right.
  14. Joseph-Chance-Fashion-Piece-Hall

    Halifax

    Joseph Chance

    Joseph Chance have an exclusive collection of items for men, including a selection of scarves, ties, cufflinks, leather goods, hip flasks and belts...
    Joseph Chance have an exclusive collection of items for men, including a selection of scarves, ties, cufflinks, leather goods, hip flasks and belts that have been selected for their craftsmanship. Many items are made locally, including leather belts from Hebden Bridge, handprinted pocket squares and hand enameled cufflinks.
  15. Shibden Hall & Estate

    Halifax

    Shibden Hall & Estate

    Filming at Shibden Hall In 2018 Shibden Hall will be involved in the filming of a new costume drama for the BBC and HBO. “Gentleman Jack&r...

    Filming at Shibden Hall In 2018 Shibden Hall will be involved in the filming of a new costume drama for the BBC and HBO. “Gentleman Jack” will be an eight part series for television written by Sally Wainwright and starring Suranne Jones as Anne Lister of Shibden Hall.

    In order to facilitate this Shibden Hall will be closed to the public from: Monday 14 May until Sunday 22 July (10 weeks) And from: Monday 3 September until Sunday 21 October (7 weeks) There will be closure of and restricted access to the Hall, middle car park, hall toilets, immediate gardens adjacent to the Hall, top car park and top entrance for vehicles. The park, lower car park, lake, Mereside café, playground, dry stone wall area, and all the concessions will remain open as normal.

    If the series is the success we expect it to be then Anne Lister and Shibden Hall will become household names like Downton Abbey. As the Hall and Halifax will feature in the production there will be an increase in visitors to this iconic building and to all of Calderdale.

    Welcome to the valley of the sheep - schep dene - the home of the Lister family for over 300 years. Shibden Hall was the home of the noted 19th century diarist Anne Lister. The Hall, dating originally from circa 1420, is a distinctive half-timbered building furnished in the styles of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, adapted and extended throughout the centuries by the families who lived here.

    Shibden Hall is set in a 32 hectares of informal park and woodland, which have won the Green Heritage Award. Explore the beautifully restored historic grounds which offer cascades, pools, tunnels, terraced and fruit gardens and "Paisley Shawl" inspired Victorian bedding designs by Joshua Major.

    Enjoy the boating lake, ride on the miniature railway, play on the pitch and putt course or the new children's play area -suitable for all abilities. The grounds also offer footpaths, an orienteering course and a permanent dry stone walling exhibition - a fine example of this fascinating craft.

    The Shibden Mereside Cafe and visitor centre is the perfect place to relax on your visit, with displays and information about the history of Shibden Estate, its habitat, landscape and environment. Function rooms are also available for you to hold your conferences, meetings and events in style. Shibden Estate also hosts live entertainment, music, walks, guided tours, storytelling and craft events in the park.

    Craft fairs, exhibitions, workshops and working demonstrations take place regularly throughout the year.

    Click here to Watch a short video, 'Shibden: 500 Years of History.'and click here to watch a second short video about 'The Anne Lister Story', with Helena Whitbread (you can see the video in full at Shibden hall).

  16. Dies used By the Cragg Vale Coiners

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Coiners

    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's a...
    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's activities were said to be so damaging that they threatened to wreck Britain's currency. David Hartley learnt his trade as an ironworker in Birmingham, before getting into trouble and moving back to Mytholmroyd to escape the authorities. Once returned to his home at Bell House farmhouse (which is now a bed & breakfast accommodation with educational facilities) David used ironworking as a cover to clip or file the edges from gold coins, milling the edges back so the change was all but unnoticeable, and making counterfeit coins from the shavings whilst returning the clipped coins into circulation. David’s activities soon spread to other farms, with families at nearby Hill Top Farm and Keelham Farm soon becoming involved; forming the beginnings of the gang of Cragg Vale Coiners. Local publicans also helped by placing the counterfeit coins into circulation. David Hartley seems to have been an enigmatic leader, becoming known as 'King David' Hartley and the gang’s numbers grew considerably until well over 30 individuals were involved. Rumours of the gang's activities reached the authorities, who sent an excise man named William Deighton to investigate. One of the coiners turned King’s Evidence and betrayed the gang, leading to Hartley's arrest at an Inn in Halifax on 14th October 1769. Hartley's brother Isaac offered £100 to anybody who would kill Deighton. It is alleged that the plotters planned Deighton's murder at an Inn in Mytholmroyd called Barbary's, which is now gone, but was located on the opposite side of the road to the present day Dusty Miller. On November 10th 1769 at Bull Close Lane near Halifax, Deighton was approached by two men, Matthew Normanton and Robert Thomas. Deighton was shot dead, his body also showing signs of having been stamped on. Just days later, the Government offered a reward of £100 for information leading to the arrest of the murderers and a pardon for anybody, bar the killers, who would turn King's Evidence. Over 30 people were subsequently arrested, including 'King David' Hartley, who was sentenced to death on April 6th 1770 and hanged at Tynburn, near York, on April 28th. His body is buried in the graveyard of the village of Heptonstall, above Hebden Bridge. Robert Thomas was acquitted of Deighton's murder, but was later hanged in 1774 for being a highwayman. Matthew Normanton initially fled the authorities, but was later caught and hanged in 1775. Isaac Hartley was never brought to trial due to a lack of evidence and died in 1815, aged 78. Heptonstall Museum has on display some of the original dies used by the Coiners to stamp their gold discs into coins, as well as panels telling more of their story.

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