Plan your stay

Grid List

1-16 of 63

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  1. Walking in Calderdale

    Across Calderdale

    Walking in Calderdale

    The stunning landscapes of Calderdale offer walks that are suitable for all ages and abilities. There’s n...

    The stunning landscapes of Calderdale offer walks that are suitable for all ages and abilities. There’s no better way to immerse yourself and discover more about this beautiful area than on foot.

    Read our Walking in Calderdale blog post for information aboiut guided walks, E Trails, walking guides, easy & family walking and ideas for great walking routes to follow, such as The Calderdale Way, the Pennine Way & Hebden Bridge Loop, Todmorden Centenary Way and great walks at Hardcastle Crags, Ogden Water and more!

  2. Smith Art Gallery, Brighouse

    Brighouse

    Smith Art Gallery & Brighouse Library

    This purpose built Art Gallery and public library, known as ‘The Rydings’, is surrounded by a beautiful park and gardens. The front gallery host...
    This purpose built Art Gallery and public library, known as ‘The Rydings’, is surrounded by a beautiful park and gardens. The front gallery hosts an exhibition of oil paintings, based on People and Places, including works by Atkinson Grimshaw, Marcus Stone and Thomas Sydney Cooper. The rear gallery hosts changing displays, covering a wide variety of themes from local artists to touring exhibitions, including photography, mixed media and sculpture, ensuring there is always something new and different to enjoy. The gallery was built by Alderman William Smith and donated, along with his collection of artwork, to the people of Brighouse in 1907. The Smith Art Gallery provides a pleasant atmosphere to meet your friends, interact with beautiful paintings and do the family gallery hunt/trail. There is also an exciting programme of temporary exhibitions in a range of media from paintings to photography and textiles, providing a wonderful experience each time you visit.
  3. Ted Hughes

    Mytholmroyd

    Ted Hughes

    Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was born at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, on the 17th August 1930. He lived there until he was seven, when his family move...
    Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was born at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, on the 17th August 1930. He lived there until he was seven, when his family moved to Mexborough. During his childhood he spent many hours exploring the countryside around Mytholmroyd, and these experiences and the influences of the landscape on him were to inform much of his later poetry. One of the greatest poets of his generation, Hughes also wrote stories, plays, reviews and essays. He translated the work of, amongst others, Ovid, Racine, Aeschylus and Euripides. He wrote extensively for children, including the story The Iron Man, which was turned into the Disney blockbuster The Iron Giant. Hughes's interests in other art forms led to many collaborations, most famously with the artist Leonard Baskin. Although best known in the UK, Hughes was a writer of international standing. He won numerous awards throughout his career, including four for his final collection, Birthday Letters. Hughes became Poet Laureate in 1984 until his death on 28th October 1998.
  4. Harveys of Halifax: Piece Hall

    Halifax

    Harveys of Halifax: Piece Hall

    Harveys are almost 100 years old and have been trading as a family run independent department store in Halifax for over 65 years. Their Piece H...
    Harveys are almost 100 years old and have been trading as a family run independent department store in Halifax for over 65 years. Their Piece Hall store is dedicated to stocking homeware items from the very best brands including Alessi, Emma Bridgewater, Joules Homeware and Orla Kiely.
  5. Bottomley's-Eyewear-Boutique

    Halifax

    Bottomley's Eyewear Boutique

    Bottomley's Eyewear Boutqiue travels the world to find the best glasses that you can't buy from the high street. If you want eyewear that you fe...
    Bottomley's Eyewear Boutqiue travels the world to find the best glasses that you can't buy from the high street. If you want eyewear that you feel and look great in then they can help you find the perfect pair with an exciting, revolutionary method. Book an appointment and find your perfect spectacles at a much more relaxed pace.
  6. eptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Heptonstall

    Heptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One...
    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One of the first octagonal chapels, it is one of the oldest Methodist churches in continuous use today. This unusual octagonal chapel is open every day. It’s tucked away at the bottom of a flight of steps off Northgate. Entry is free, with donations to the upkeep of the Chapel welcome. The chapel's senior steward, Margaret Coupe, can be contacted on 01422 842550 or at margaret.coupe12@mypostoffice.co.uk Methodism in Heptonstall began with the firebrand Scot William Darney. He founded many societies on both sides of the Pennines as he travelled, preaching as he went. The Heptonstall “Darney Society” was visited by Charles and John Wesley in 1747. In these early days, Heptonstall had a preacher every sixth Sunday, with the travelling preachers receiving no stipend or allowance, eating where they could. John Wesley continued to visit Heptonstall and there were always immense crowds to hear him. The society was so successful it was decided to build a chapel. The octagon shape was then fashionable for Methodist preaching houses, as it avoided conflict with the established church. The building was finished in 1764. It was intended to hold 200 people, but by 1802 there were 337 members and over 1000 scholars. The solution was to knock down the far end of the chapel, lengthen the walls and rebuild it, preserving its octagonal shape.
  7. Spogs and Spice

    Halifax

    Spogs and Spice

    Take a trip down memory lane with Spogs & Spice, a sweet shop that is just as you remember from your childhood. Step inside and be transported b...
    Take a trip down memory lane with Spogs & Spice, a sweet shop that is just as you remember from your childhood. Step inside and be transported back in time as the delicious smells of your favourite sweets guide you around the traditional shop. The shelves are stacked with jars of Pear Drops, Cinder Toffee, Strawberry Laces, Sherbet Lemons, Midget Gems, Chocolate Limes and more, with a pick 'n' mix selection, locally made fudge and an American candy range to really get those tastebuds tingling. For those special occasions, Spogs & Spice offer personalised sweet gifts and favours including their best-selling personalised Love Hearts.
  8. Gingerbread

    Halifax

    Gingerbread

    Gingerbread can create spaces in your home that are elegant, desirable and yet remain functional and practical. They have an eclectic range of prod...
    Gingerbread can create spaces in your home that are elegant, desirable and yet remain functional and practical. They have an eclectic range of products that enables them to serve all tastes and budgets, from the faded elegance of aged linens, antiques & vintage pieces to contemporary fabrics and wall coverings that are digitally printed and environmentally-friendly. Gingerbread have a broad network of suppliers and support several cottage industries. This includes a unique partnership with Ryburn Valley Furniture, who design and create beautiful, bespoke Kitchens, Bedrooms & furniture to compliment your home, lifestyle & taste. Gingerbread’s interior styling service is available to make the whole experience of changing and moving homes easy and enjoyable and to create a bespoke vision for you. The team offer an initial consultation either at The Piece Hall or in your home and can create your dream interior by offering a full project management service.
  9. The Piece Hall, Halifax by Paul White

    Halifax

    The Piece Hall

    The Piece Hall is unique. A Grade I listed Georgian masterpiece and the oldest remaining cloth hall in Britain. Following a multi-million pound...
    The Piece Hall is unique. A Grade I listed Georgian masterpiece and the oldest remaining cloth hall in Britain. Following a multi-million pound transformation project, Britain's magnificent and last surviving cloth hall is ready to welcome visitors again. The Grade I listed structure has stood at the heart of Halifax since 1779 and has now re-opened as a world class cultural, heritage and leisure destination. The huge open-air courtyard is surrounded by a mix of independent bars, restaurants, cafes, galleries and shops. The stories of Georgian Halifax are told in the specially created exhibition spaces, while the central courtyard plays host to a year-round events programme of music, dance, film and spectacle for up to 7,500 people at a time.
  10. The Buttress

    Hebden Bridge

    The Buttress

    Part of an ancient packhorse route, the Buttress offers a steep, cobbled ascent from the market town of Hebden Bridge to the village of Heptonstall...
    Part of an ancient packhorse route, the Buttress offers a steep, cobbled ascent from the market town of Hebden Bridge to the village of Heptonstall, set atop the hillside hundreds of feet above Hebden Bridge. Although less than a mile in distance, the ascent is quite challenging due to its steep and cobbled nature. However, this does not deter dozens of enthusiastic cyclists from riding up to the top in the annual 'Up the Buttress' hill cycle challenge. The Buttress can also be tackled in a more leisurely fashion and is suitable for walking. Suitable footwear is recommended as the cobbles can be a little slippy when wet. The Buttress begins its ascent from Hebden Bridge just off Old Gate/ Royd Terrace. If you cross the Packhorse Bridge from Bridge Gate, then you will see the cobbles of the Buttress to you left. almost opposite Hangingroyd Lane on your right.
  11. The Pennine Way

    Todmorden

    The Pennine Way

    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of England and offers 268 miles of the ...
    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of England and offers 268 miles of the finest upland walking in England. A once in a lifetime experience. The Pennine Way enters Calderdale at Blackstone Edge, passing Stoodley Pike, dropping down into the valley at Callis, climbing back up to Colden and over the moors to Widdop. Walkers often say this stretch of over 20 miles is one of the best on the whole route. The Trail is very well way-marked and there are some great views from the route (especially from the iconic Stoodley Pike). If you want to detour into Hebden Bridge on your way, you can use the Hebden Bridge Loop path developed in 2015.
  12. Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax

    Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnific...
    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnificent 180ft tower and spire which is enriched with sculpture. Free guided tours of Halifax Town Hall can be arranged to help you learn more about its fascinating history. Please contact the Mayor's Office on 01422 393022.
  13. Hali-Facts Trail front page

    Halifax

    Hali-Facts Heritage Discovery Trail

    This Heritage Discovery Trail has been designed for children and families, but will be enjoyed by people of all ages. It will take you on a walking...
    This Heritage Discovery Trail has been designed for children and families, but will be enjoyed by people of all ages. It will take you on a walking tour around Halifax town centre, asking you to use your detective skills of observation, thinking, note taking and sketching as you go. Each of the locations to discover is clearly marked on the map alongside.
  14. Loafers

    Halifax

    Loafers

    Selling new and used vinyl records amongst iconic artwork, influenced by seminal bands, their gigs and albums. Loafers is a haven for music lovers....
    Selling new and used vinyl records amongst iconic artwork, influenced by seminal bands, their gigs and albums. Loafers is a haven for music lovers. Owner Mark Richardson, a long-time lover of vinyl records, offers a wide range of genres to browse, with a selection of the more obscure sounds that can be found in the record rack titled ‘otherness.’ Mark also serves locally roasted and hand brewed Darkwoods Coffee, tea and soft drinks..
  15. Innovation at Hebden Bridge Mill

    Hebden Bridge

    Innovation at Hebden Bridge Mill

    Welcome to Hebden Bridge mill, a building which has stood at the centre of this town, even before there was a town! The Mill is home to Innovation ...
    Welcome to Hebden Bridge mill, a building which has stood at the centre of this town, even before there was a town! The Mill is home to Innovation Shop & Cafe-Bar. We invite you to visit us, to enjoy the wonderful ambience of this historic building. This principle of environmental sustainability characterises our entire business, with a wide range ethically sourced goods available in our shop, wholesome locally sourced food in the café and all our energy generated on site from fully renewable sources.
  16. Dies used By the Cragg Vale Coiners

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Coiners

    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's a...
    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's activities were said to be so damaging that they threatened to wreck Britain's currency. David Hartley learnt his trade as an ironworker in Birmingham, before getting into trouble and moving back to Mytholmroyd to escape the authorities. Once returned to his home at Bell House farmhouse (which is now a bed & breakfast accommodation with educational facilities) David used ironworking as a cover to clip or file the edges from gold coins, milling the edges back so the change was all but unnoticeable, and making counterfeit coins from the shavings whilst returning the clipped coins into circulation. David’s activities soon spread to other farms, with families at nearby Hill Top Farm and Keelham Farm soon becoming involved; forming the beginnings of the gang of Cragg Vale Coiners. Local publicans also helped by placing the counterfeit coins into circulation. David Hartley seems to have been an enigmatic leader, becoming known as 'King David' Hartley and the gang’s numbers grew considerably until well over 30 individuals were involved. Rumours of the gang's activities reached the authorities, who sent an excise man named William Deighton to investigate. One of the coiners turned King’s Evidence and betrayed the gang, leading to Hartley's arrest at an Inn in Halifax on 14th October 1769. Hartley's brother Isaac offered £100 to anybody who would kill Deighton. It is alleged that the plotters planned Deighton's murder at an Inn in Mytholmroyd called Barbary's, which is now gone, but was located on the opposite side of the road to the present day Dusty Miller. On November 10th 1769 at Bull Close Lane near Halifax, Deighton was approached by two men, Matthew Normanton and Robert Thomas. Deighton was shot dead, his body also showing signs of having been stamped on. Just days later, the Government offered a reward of £100 for information leading to the arrest of the murderers and a pardon for anybody, bar the killers, who would turn King's Evidence. Over 30 people were subsequently arrested, including 'King David' Hartley, who was sentenced to death on April 6th 1770 and hanged at Tynburn, near York, on April 28th. His body is buried in the graveyard of the village of Heptonstall, above Hebden Bridge. Robert Thomas was acquitted of Deighton's murder, but was later hanged in 1774 for being a highwayman. Matthew Normanton initially fled the authorities, but was later caught and hanged in 1775. Isaac Hartley was never brought to trial due to a lack of evidence and died in 1815, aged 78. Heptonstall Museum has on display some of the original dies used by the Coiners to stamp their gold discs into coins, as well as panels telling more of their story.

Grid List

1-16 of 63

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4