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  1. Another World Adventure Centre, Ogden, Halifax

    Halifax

    Another World Adventure Centre

    Welcome to Another World Adventure Center, activity and adventure in the West Yorkshire area. Our activities include, mountain boarding, skiing and...
    Welcome to Another World Adventure Center, activity and adventure in the West Yorkshire area. Our activities include, mountain boarding, skiing and snowboarding in the winter months (weather permitting), archery and crossbows, rifle and pistol shooting, target slingshot and slingshot paintball, zorbing, bumper balls, survival and bushcraft courses, den building and bushcraft for the younger ones, go-kart building / racing and team building activities.
  2. Rokt Climbing Gym

    Brighouse

    ROKT Climbing Gym

    Adrenalin pumping, heart stopping, fear inducing! The unique Rokt Climbing Gym offers indoor climbing at its best and the highest outdoor climbi...

    Adrenalin pumping, heart stopping, fear inducing! The unique Rokt Climbing Gym offers indoor climbing at its best and the highest outdoor climbing wall in the UK: the ROKTFACE!

    Whether you're an experienced climber, you're a little rusty, or you've never climbed before - old or young are welcome to use our facilities.

    Bring the little ones… The Kids Attics is a great space for your kids to play and climb in safety. There are small climbing wall, mini boulders, a ball pool and seating. So why not bring the little ones with you next time the old ones are on a session or off climbing. We have tea, coffee & snacks available from reception.

    Climbers now have an Olympic-class bouldering and training arena to thrive in after a new £100,000 facility opened its doors. Stretching across the top two floors, the Northlight at ROKT has been created in Rokt's colossal loft. It features “next-level bouldering”, with 1/4 km2 of curved and acutely angled bouldering walls, slabs, barrels and overhangs using the latest holds and coatings.

    Whether you’ve never climbed anything more than a fence or you compete in national competitions, there's something for you at ROKT!

    We're located only a hundred metres from the route of The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route that circles the whole borough. Drop in and see us if you're passing by.

    Click here to watch a short video about Rokt Climbing Gym from The Yorkshire Post.

  3. ROKTFACE

    Brighouse

    ROKTFACE

    UK’s highest man-made outdoor climbing wall right here at ROKT. Higher than both the Tower of London and the Angel of the North, the towering RO...
    UK’s highest man-made outdoor climbing wall right here at ROKT. Higher than both the Tower of London and the Angel of the North, the towering ROKTFACE wall at ROKT climbing centre in Brighouse, West Yorkshire, will see people climb routes up to 36m. The cost to climb ROKTFACE for competent rope climbers will be £15 for up to 1 hour 30 minutes and that price includes full entry to climb inside ROKT Climbing Centre. For beginners/novice climbers, you will need an instructed session to climb ROKTFACE. These can be pre-booked and cost £30 for one person, £50 for two people, £60 for three people or £70 for four. Basically, the more people the cheaper it is. Group bookings (schools/team building/stag/hen/Scouts/Guides etc) taken too. The climbing wall is being created on one of the faces of a sky-scraping disused grain silos, which sits alongside the Calder and Hebble Navigation and close to the route of The Calderdale Way. Around 2,500 bolts are being drilled to create up to 21 unique routes. The £75,000 project is being led by ROKT climbing in partnership with Calderdale Council to help raise the profile and participation of healthy activity as well as tourism for the area. It will give daredevils views of up to around 20 miles across Yorkshire – the UK’s biggest county. The routes have been set by respected climbers and range from 28m to 36m high. Email - climbing@rokt.co.uk
  4. Gibson Mill, Hardcastle Crags

    Hebden Bridge

    Hardcastle Crags & Gibson Mill

    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the...
    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the country. Gibson Mill is situated within Hardcastle Crags woodland beside Hebden Water. The National Trust have put in some superb waymarked walking routes suitable for all abilities. Cross the river on stepping stones and spot birds, insects, amphibians and if you're lucky; deer! You'll find Hardcastle Crags offers a completely different experience throughout the year - from the icicles of midwinter to the carpet of bluebells in the spring. The early 19th century Gibson Mill is situated within the site. A tour of the mill tells the history of the valley and the mill over the past 200 years. The mill also has changing exhibitions throughout the year. Gibson Mill is 100% self-sufficient in energy, water and waste treatment. It has a hydro-electric system, solar photovoltaic panels and a log-burning stove fuelled by wood from the estate. You can also rest and recharge at the Weaving Shed Café, serving delicious ethical and locally-produced food and buy the perfect gift or memento in the shop located there. Built in around 1800,Gibson Mill was one of the first mills of the Industrial Revolution. The mill was driven by a water wheel and produced cotton cloth up until 1890. In the early 1900s, Gibson Mill began to be used as an ‘entertainment emporium’ for the local people. After the Second World War, the mill slipped into disuse, and was acquired by the National Trust in 1950. Hardcastle Crags is open all year round from dawn until dusk, admission to Hardcastle Crags and Gibson Mill are FREE. Dogs are welcome (including in the café and mill) if kept under close control. GETTING THERE You have three options to get to Hardcastle Crags: By car - there is parking at Midgehole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AA) and Clough Hole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AZ). A parking fee applies at both car parks, although parking is free for National Trust members By bus – the 906 runs from Hebden Bridge on weekends between May and October. It will take you to both the bottom and the top of the valley. Walking – there is a route from Hebden Bridge on good paths with a bit of road walking. It will take you about 45 minutes. Pick up a guide from Hebden Bridge Visitor Centre. See below for details of the wildlife you can discover at Hardcastle Crags.
  5. The Calderdale Way

    Across Calderdale

    The Calderdale Way

    A superb way to go walking in Calderdale - The Calderdale Way is a 50 mile (80 km) walk exploring the...

    A superb way to go walking in Calderdale - The Calderdale Way is a 50 mile (80 km) walk exploring the hills, moors and valleys of Calderdale that recently celebrated its 40th anniversary.

    It is an ‘up and down’ journey with few level sections. However, the higher levels provide some exceptionally fine panoramic views. The main and link routes to the valley bottom are designed so that they can be completed in short stages.

    The Calderdale Way encircles Halifax, Hebden Bridge and Todmorden, following old packhorse ways across the open gritstone hillsides with sections of traditional stone causeway, passing through hillside villages and old mill towns on the banks of the River Calder.

    There are numerous link paths which connect the Calderdale Way to the valley floor. There are medieval settlements at Lumbutts and Mankinholes, and Withens Gate, where the Pennine Way crosses. A short diversion along the Pennine Way takes in the popular walk to the 100ft monument, Stoodley Pike.

    The full length of the route is 51.39 miles, with a total climb of approx 2,600 metres (over 9,000 feet) at a climb rate of 43 metres per mile. This makes a flat equivalent distance of 57.49 miles.

    For more information about walking in Calderdale please visit our Walking page.

    Hot weather leads to an increased risk of moorland fires in Calderdale. Please take care when out and about in moorlands around Calderdale and West Yorkshire. You can find more advice here. The burning of moorland is not a victimless crime. If you see anything suspicious report it to crimestoppers 0800 555111. #moorlandfires @WestYorksPolice @West_Yorks_FRS

  6. The Countryside Code

    Across Calderdale

    The Countryside Code

    The Countryside Code has been updated, to take into account the new circumstances we face as a result of the COV...

    The Countryside Code has been updated, to take into account the new circumstances we face as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Please follow the code so we can all enjoy Calderdale's magnificent countryside responsibly.

    Here's a summary of the Code's key points.

    Respect other people:

    • consider the local community and other people enjoying the outdoors
    • leave gates and property as you find them and follow paths unless wider access is available

    Protect the natural environment:

    • leave no trace of your visit and take your litter home
    • keep dogs under effective control

    Enjoy the outdoors:

    • plan ahead and be prepared
    • follow advice and local signs

    Please follow the hyperlink below for the full version of the guide.

  7. Powerplay Paintball & Operation Laser Tag

    Brighouse

    Powerplay Paintball & Operation Laser Tag

    Operation Laser Tag offers woodland laser tag sessions from age 6 using the latest Hi-Tec equipment to bring you interesting and varied games. L...
    Operation Laser Tag offers woodland laser tag sessions from age 6 using the latest Hi-Tec equipment to bring you interesting and varied games. Laser Tag is ideal for birthday parties, school or youth group sessions, stag or hen parties or just an action packed day out. Sessions are from one to three hours and prices start at £10/player. If you are looking for a game at your venue, we have a full mobile set up as well as our popular rental packages. ​We also offer Paintball and Battlezone Archery sessions in the woodland environment. Soft Dart (Nerf guns) are very popular with junior players. We have a complete hire set up including barricades for customers who are looking at running an indoor event and we also have a target range that can be hired. Our standard laser tag sessions are ideal for players from 8 years old and are held in our woodland venues at Brighouse. The most popular session is the 2 hour Sgt Major package. All our laser tag sessions are "Exclusive" so you only play with your own group. You will not be mixed with other groups therefore they are ideal for private parties. We offer food options but you are welcome to cater for your own players. E-mail address - info@operationlasertag.co.uk
  8. Sowerby Bridge Swimming Pool & Fitness Centre

    Sowerby Bridge

    Sowerby Bridge Swimming Pool & Fitness Centre

    Please note that Sowerby BridgeSwimming Pool will be closing to the public from 20th March until further notice.

    Sowerb...

    Please note that Sowerby BridgeSwimming Pool will be closing to the public from 20th March until further notice.

    Sowerby we offer a wide range of state of the art Technogym equipment, designed with the Wellness system to motivate, encourage and simplify your training.

    Our swimming pool is great for both recreational and fitness purposes. Having both shallow and a deep end it makes it accessible for young, old, able bodied and disabled customers alike to use our pools.

    Our exercise studios have semi-sprung floors and air conditioning and are the perfect place to lose weight, tone up, get healthy and have fun.With so many enjoyable exercise classes on offer, you'll be spoilt for choice.

  9. Cromwell Bottom Local Nature Reserve, Brighouse

    Brighouse

    Cromwell Bottom Local Nature Reserve

    Cromwell Bottom is one of the most important wildlife sites in Calderdale. Situated next to the Calder and Hebble Navigation, the River Calder runs...
    Cromwell Bottom is one of the most important wildlife sites in Calderdale. Situated next to the Calder and Hebble Navigation, the River Calder runs through the reserve. The wetlands and meadows provide a variety of habitats for many insects, including butterflies, moths, dragonflies and damselflies. A bird feeding area attracts many birds to the site, including bullfinch, dunnock, woodpeckers, robins and redpoll. Other birds that can be seen or heard around the site include kingfishers, oystercatchers and curlew. Many mammals and amphibians have also made Cromwell Bottom their home. The reserve is wheelchair friendly, with many of the paths being suitable for wheelchair access. The paths are generally smooth, and there are no steep gradients. A RADAR key is required to open the gate fully to allow easier access. The reserve is accessed from the A6025 (Elland Road). Turn along a road by the side of Cromwell House (a large red brick building), then left under a height barrier into the small car park. The reserve is signposted from the far end of the car park. There are also buses that travel along the A6025.
  10. Wainhouse Tower, Halifax photo by Alastair Wallace

    Halifax

    Wainhouse Tower

    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The ...
    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The structure was never actually used as a working chimney and as such, is regarded by many as one of Britain's finest follies. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Wainhouse Tower was open to the public on the Bank Holidays, for those brave enough to tackle the 403 steps to the viewing gallery at the top, the stunning views make it well worth the climb. We hope that it will be possible to reopen the Tower to visitors in 2021 and will add any dates the Tower may be open to the public here when and if they are confirmed. A Brief History of Wainhouse Tower Born in 1817 John Edward Wainhouse inherited his Uncle’s Dyeworks on Washer Lane, Halifax in 1856. The Dyeworks were typical of the day, causing considerable pollution because of smoke emissions. Halifax was badly affected by smog. For weeks on end the smoke laden atmosphere blanketed the town, reducing sunlight and contaminating the landscape with soot and sulphur trioxide. This national problem caused the Government to introduce a Smoke Abatement Act. Wainhouse developed the idea of building a chimney 350 metres up the hillside from the Dyeworks, connected to it by an underground tunnel. Sir Henry Edwards, A wealthy neighbour of John Edward Wainhouse, made complaints about the smoke nuisance caused by the Dyeworks, leading to a feud between the two men. Mr Isaac Booth (who was also Sir Henry’s architect) was asked by Wainhouse to design and build the mill chimney. The design incorporated an internal staircase that led to four balcony features. This exacerbated the deepening feud between Wainhouse and Sir Henry. Sir Henry, an extrovert and boastful man, claimed that his private estate at Pye Nest could not be viewed from any house o the hills. Wainhouse said he would rectify this by putting an observatory at the top of his chimney. Work commenced in 1871. In 1873, as a result of the feuding; the architect Isaac Booth decided he could no longer work for either man. This led to the appointment of Richard Swarbrick Dugdale, who redesigned the upper section of the building. The new design incorporated a corbelled and balustrade balcony, surmounted by a lantern dome and finial. The building was completed on the 9th September 1875. It is estimated that over 9,000 tonnes of materials were used. The total cost is thought to be in the region of £15,000. However, by the time the building was completed, it was clear that it would never be used as a chimney. The Washer Lane Dyeworks had been sold in 1874 to the works manager Mr Henry Mossman. The sale did not include the Tower. It is thought that Mossman saw the then uncompleted building to be a liability. This point of view is difficult to understand given the fact that Mossman was then prosecuted under the Smoke Abatement Act. Mossman proved that considerable efforts were made to abate the smoke nuisance by pulling down six existing small chimneys …and erecting a large chimney in their place! John Edward Wainhouse died on 26th July 1883 at the age of 66. He as buried in the family grave at Holy Trinity Churchyard, Halifax. The gravestone is located against the boundary wall on the south side of the Church. The Tower and three acres of surrounding land was sold by auction in 1887. The Tower changed hands several times until coming under the ownership of the Halifax Corporation in 1919. During the Second World War the Tower was used by the military authorities as an observation post. As a result of the reorganisation of Local Government in 1974, Wainhouse Tower became the property of Calderdale Council. Today the Tower is used as a viewing platform; open to the public on Bank Holidays and other select days through the year
  11. The Pennine Way

    Todmorden

    The Pennine Way

    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of ...

    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of England and offers 268 miles of the finest upland walking in England. A once in a lifetime experience.

    The Pennine Way enters Calderdale at Blackstone Edge, passing Stoodley Pike, dropping down into the valley at Callis, climbing back up to Colden and over the moors to Widdop. Walkers often say this stretch of over 20 miles is one of the best on the whole route. The Trail is very well way-marked and there are some great views from the route (especially from the iconic Stoodley Pike).

    If you want to detour into Hebden Bridge on your way, you can use the Hebden Bridge Loop developed in 2015.

    For more information about walking in Calderdale, please visit our Walking page.

  12. North Dean Woods

    Halifax

    North Dean Woods

    North Dean Wood is an example of the type of woodland that used to cover much of the countryside in the North of England. The woods lie on the outs...
    North Dean Wood is an example of the type of woodland that used to cover much of the countryside in the North of England. The woods lie on the outskirts of Greetland and offer an extensive network of footpaths, including part of the Calderdale Way. You will also discover a wide variety of plant and birdlife. The entrance to the wood is near to Clay House and Clay House Park. Oaks are the most common trees in the wood, but in some areas Birch trees are dominant. You will also find Beech, Sycamore, Rowan, holly, Alder and ash trees. Over 60 different species of birds have been recorded in North Dean Wood. Some are resident all year, some are summer visitors arriving in spring and leaving in autumn and a few are winter visitors. A wide range of plant life can be found, from mosses, liverworts and lichens to the mighty trees and some fungi, which offer a varied and colourful display, especially in the autumn. The many flowering plants include Heather, Bilberry, Wood Sorrel and Bluebells. Wildlife in North Dean can be difficult to observe, with many of the residents being nocturnal and the remainder keeping well hidden even when active during the day. Most often seen are rabbits and squirrels. Foxes and Stoats may also be seen although both are largely nocturnal . Smaller mammals such as Shrews, Voles, Mice and hedgehogs are present, but seldom seen. Frogs, Toad and Newts can be found in the wettest areas of the Wood. The visible rocks in North Dean Wood are from the Upper Carboniferous Period (formed about 250 million years ago). The rocks belong to the Millstone Grit Series. The valley floor is covered with a thick layer of gravel and sand, deposited in the Late Glacial Period when, as the ice melted, vast quantities of water flowed into what is now Calderdale through the gaps at Waldsden and Cliviger. On top of this gravel is silt deposited by the River Calder, on which the plant cover grows. There are regular bus services from Huddersfield and Halifax bus stations to Greetland.
  13. The Hebden Bridge Loop on the Pennine Way

    Hebden Bridge

    The Hebden Bridge Loop

    To coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Pennine Way, Hebden Bridge Walkers Action created a waymarked rout...

    To coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Pennine Way, Hebden Bridge Walkers Action created a waymarked route to Hebden Bridge and back to the Pennine Way via the ancient village of Heptonstall. A superb route to enjoy walking in Calderdale.

    Please scroll down the page for several sets of directions involving the loop.

    For more information abou walking in Calderdale please visit our Walking Page.

  14. Calder Homes Park, Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge

    Calder Holmes Park

    Calder Holmes Park is a green open space, close to Hebden Bridge town centre. The park has an outdoor gym, a skateboard park childrens’ pl...

    Calder Holmes Park is a green open space, close to Hebden Bridge town centre. The park has an outdoor gym, a skateboard park childrens’ playground and is home to Park Life Cafe.

    There are some short flat tarmac paths to walk on and you can combine this with walking on the adjacent canal towpath and watch the narrowboats slip by.

    The park hosts a variety of events throughout the year such as the Hebden Bridge Handmade Parade.

  15. People's Park, Halifax

    Halifax

    People's Park

    People's Park is one of the finest surviving examples of a "Joseph Paxton" Park. Created in 1857, the Park was donated to the people of Halifax by ...
    People's Park is one of the finest surviving examples of a "Joseph Paxton" Park. Created in 1857, the Park was donated to the people of Halifax by Sir Francis Crossley. It is to be maintained by Calderdale Council, then the 'Halifax Corporation', for all time. Situated at the Western edge of Halifax, the 12.5 acre site is in the heart of a conservation area. It provides a green and pleasant haven. A restoration programme that began in 1995 has revitalised the park with new facilities such as the children's play area, public toilets and the visitor's centre. The bandstand, water features (including the central fountain, serpentine pools, gargoyle fountains in the pavilion pools), statues, balustrading, pavilion and cast iron bridges have all been conserved and repaired and disabled access provided to the park via the college entrance and onto the terrace promenade. People's Park has been awarded the coveted Green Flag status.
  16. Walking in Calderdale

    Across Calderdale

    Walking in Calderdale

    The stunning landscapes of Calderdale offer walks that are suitable for all ages and abilities. There’s n...

    The stunning landscapes of Calderdale offer walks that are suitable for all ages and abilities. There’s no better way to immerse yourself and discover more about this beautiful area than on foot.

    Visit our Walking page for information about guided walks, E Trails, walking guides, easy & family walking and ideas for great walking routes to follow, such as The Calderdale Way, the Pennine Way & Hebden Bridge Loop, Todmorden Centenary Way and great walks at Hardcastle Crags, Ogden Water and more!

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