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  1. Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum

    Halifax

    Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum

    Please note that the Museum will be closing to the public from 20th March until further notice....

    Please note that the Museum will be closing to the public from 20th March until further notice.

    Representing over 300 years of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, since its raising in 1702, this museum tells the stories of the soldiers who served using their own words.

    The ‘Iron Duke’, Arthur Wellesley, was the Colonel of the 33rd which became, after his death, the only Regiment to be named after a person not of the Royal Blood.

    Displays include items relating to the Duke himself and to the rich and varied history of the regiment, including the campaigns of 33rd and 76th foot.

    The Duke of Wellington’s Regiment has a long association with the town of Halifax and its location within Bankfield Museum complements the wider history on display here.

    FREE Admission

  2. Another World Adventure Centre, Ogden, Halifax

    Halifax

    Another World Adventure Centre

    Welcome to Another World Adventure Center, activity and adventure in the West Yorkshire area. Our activities include, mountain boarding, skiing and...
    Welcome to Another World Adventure Center, activity and adventure in the West Yorkshire area. Our activities include, mountain boarding, skiing and snowboarding in the winter months (weather permitting), archery and crossbows, rifle and pistol shooting, target slingshot and slingshot paintball, zorbing, bumper balls, survival and bushcraft courses, den building and bushcraft for the younger ones, go-kart building / racing and team building activities.
  3. Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax

    Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnific...
    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnificent 180ft tower and spire which is enriched with sculpture. Free guided tours of Halifax Town Hall can be arranged to help you learn more about its fascinating history. Please contact the Mayor's Office on 01422 393022.
  4. People's Park, Halifax

    Halifax

    People's Park

    People's Park is one of the finest surviving examples of a "Joseph Paxton" Park. Created in 1857, the Park was donated to the people of Halifax by ...
    People's Park is one of the finest surviving examples of a "Joseph Paxton" Park. Created in 1857, the Park was donated to the people of Halifax by Sir Francis Crossley. It is to be maintained by Calderdale Council, then the 'Halifax Corporation', for all time. Situated at the Western edge of Halifax, the 12.5 acre site is in the heart of a conservation area. It provides a green and pleasant haven. A restoration programme that began in 1995 has revitalised the park with new facilities such as the children's play area, public toilets and the visitor's centre. The bandstand, water features (including the central fountain, serpentine pools, gargoyle fountains in the pavilion pools), statues, balustrading, pavilion and cast iron bridges have all been conserved and repaired and disabled access provided to the park via the college entrance and onto the terrace promenade. People's Park has been awarded the coveted Green Flag status.
  5. Halifax Ski & Snowboard Centre

    Halifax

    Halifax Ski & Snowboard Centre

    For over 25 years, Halifax Ski & Snowboard Centre has nestled in the hills above Halifax, West Yorkshire. Anyone can learn to Ski or Snowboard a...
    For over 25 years, Halifax Ski & Snowboard Centre has nestled in the hills above Halifax, West Yorkshire. Anyone can learn to Ski or Snowboard and as one of the UK’s premier ski and snowboarding Centres, we pride ourselves in helping you to learn to the highest possible standard. There are two options. The first is to start with a group taster session to see if you like it or not? If you get the bug, we then have a 6 hour course that runs for three weeks to get you up and running and will get you snowploughing down the slopes. The second option is private lessons. These are tailored to your individual needs; you have your own instructor and the timing of the lessons is more flexible. All lessons include your skis and boots, so all you have to bring with you are gloves and appropriate clothing for the weather.
  6. Jerusalem Farm & Wade Wood Local Nature Reserve

    Halifax

    Jerusalem Farm & Wade Wood Local Nature Reserve

    Jerusalem Farm and Wade Wood is a 13-hectare nature reserve with many woodland pathways and perfect spots for picnics and paddling. The kids will h...
    Jerusalem Farm and Wade Wood is a 13-hectare nature reserve with many woodland pathways and perfect spots for picnics and paddling. The kids will have great fun splashing about in the stream and there is plenty of space to play. There are also picnic tables and spots in the shade. The Calderdale Way passes close by the reserve. Wade Wood and the landscape around it is home to many woodland birds such as nuthatches, Tree Creepers, Goldfinch, Robins and Woodpeckers. If you're lucky (and very quiet) you may also catch a sight of deer! The site has a wide variety of fungi during the autumn months. However is known for midges on summer evenings, so don't forget the midge repellent when you come to visit! Please note: Access to the woods from the car park is by a steep grass track. There is a zig-zag path from the car park to the grass, which is stroller accessible for the kids. The car park is only small and also serves the camp site and self-catering accommodation at Jerusalem Farm, so please arrive early if you're coming to visit. The car park closes at dusk and is locked for the night.
  7. Calderdale Industrial Museum, Halifax

    Halifax

    Calderdale Industrial Museum

    The Calderdale Industrial Museum in Halifax is open to the public! You can visit each Saturday from 10am - 4pm, last entry 3pm.

    The Muse...

    The Calderdale Industrial Museum in Halifax is open to the public! You can visit each Saturday from 10am - 4pm, last entry 3pm.

    The Museum houses a collection of industrial machinery and artifacts over four floors. Some of the machines are the only surviving examples in the country and have been placed in settings to give a close representation to the time when they were fully operational in the not too distant past.

    Down in the basement, the oil engine ‘Sadie’ provides motive power for part of an extensive collection of locally-manufactured machine tools, including lathes, drills and planers. You can take in the experience of nineteenth century Mytholm Coal Mine, learn about stone extraction and the exploitation of clay in the fireclay industries.

    The Power Gallery on the ground floor illustrates the story of power generation, from the water wheel to the internal combustion engine, by way of steam and electricity. The availability of power, initially from the numerous well-fed streams throughout Calderdale, was key to the growth of local industry.

    The first floor displays products that were made in Calderdale. World-famous names such as Mackintosh’s Toffees and Crossley’s carpets were everyday brands originating in Halifax.

    The top floor is still to be renovated and will be opened progressively over the next few years. The objective is to develop and present the story of how worsted cloth is manufactured from sheep’s wool.

    The Museum is operated by the Calderdale Industrial Museum Association (CIMA). a registered charity and dedicated group of enthusiastic volunteers.

    A great opportunity to witness the rise of the Industrial Revolution in the Calder Valley!

    Adults: £5 Concessions (senior citizens & students): £4 Accompanied Children aged up to 16: FREE

    Keep up to date with our Facebook page

  8. Ogden Water Country Park

    Halifax

    Ogden Water Country Park

    Ogden Water offers excellent opportunities to escape from the stresses and strains of everyday life.

    Ogden Water is a very popular desti...

    Ogden Water offers excellent opportunities to escape from the stresses and strains of everyday life.

    Ogden Water is a very popular destination for picnics, walking, family outings and nature activities and was officially Yorkshire's Favourite Reservoir in 2018, having won a public vote. 

    Why not enjoy a picnic at our picnic tables whilst taking in the stunning views.

    There are hourly buses to Ogden Water from Halifax bus station.

    There is a lovely level footpath around Ogden Water and three longer walks from the site. Friends of Calderdale Countryside have produced a detailed guide which is available at the Ogden shop, local visitor centres and the Heart of the Pennines on-line shop.

  9. Sowerby Bridge Swimming Pool & Fitness Centre

    Sowerby Bridge

    Sowerby Bridge Swimming Pool & Fitness Centre

    Please note that Sowerby BridgeSwimming Pool will be closing to the public from 20th March until further notice.

    Sowerb...

    Please note that Sowerby BridgeSwimming Pool will be closing to the public from 20th March until further notice.

    Sowerby we offer a wide range of state of the art Technogym equipment, designed with the Wellness system to motivate, encourage and simplify your training.

    Our swimming pool is great for both recreational and fitness purposes. Having both shallow and a deep end it makes it accessible for young, old, able bodied and disabled customers alike to use our pools.

    Our exercise studios have semi-sprung floors and air conditioning and are the perfect place to lose weight, tone up, get healthy and have fun.With so many enjoyable exercise classes on offer, you'll be spoilt for choice.

  10. Halifax Playhouse

    Halifax

    Halifax Playhouse

    Halifax Playhouse, the home of Halifax Thespians, and one of West Yorkshire's leading venues for live theatre. It's often said that you never kn...

    Halifax Playhouse, the home of Halifax Thespians, and one of West Yorkshire's leading venues for live theatre. It's often said that you never know what to expect when you step through the doors of Halifax Playhouse. As the home of Halifax Thespians, the Playhouse can surprise, delight, amuse and entertain, and that's before the interval.

    The enthusiasm of the actors, singers, dancers and musicians who perform at the Playhouse really does shine through, giving you a first class night out (or a matinee) every time.Relax in the cosy and welcoming surroundings of the Playhouse Bar. It is open from 7pm (6.45pm on Saturdays) to 11pm when there is a show on. You can order your interval drinks before the show to avoid queuing later.

    The Playhouse coffee lounge opens in the interval of most shows, serving fairtrade coffee or tea. At other times coffee is available from the bar.

  11. Todmorden Hippodrome Theatre

    Todmorden

    Todmorden Hippodrome Theatre

    The Todmorden Hippodrome is a 485 seat Edwardian variety theatre nestling in the Upper Calder Valley town of Todmorden. Owned and run by the To...
    The Todmorden Hippodrome is a 485 seat Edwardian variety theatre nestling in the Upper Calder Valley town of Todmorden. Owned and run by the Todmorden Amateur Operatic and Dramatic Society (or TAODS for short!) the Hippodrome was built in 1908 and is still presenting live events today. The Hippodrome presents a wide variety of events including musicals, plays, films, live music events and is home to the Hippodrome Youth Theatre, the youth section of TAODS. The Hippodrome screens regular monthly films at their the ‘Electric Palace’ cinema, complete with popcorn, sweets and refreshments (And the bar is open for the evening films!).
  12. Wainhouse Tower, Halifax photo by Alastair Wallace

    Halifax

    Wainhouse Tower

    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The ...
    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The structure was never actually used as a working chimney and as such, is regarded by many as one of Britain's finest follies. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Wainhouse Tower was open to the public on the Bank Holidays, for those brave enough to tackle the 403 steps to the viewing gallery at the top, the stunning views make it well worth the climb. We hope that it will be possible to reopen the Tower to visitors in 2021 and will add any dates the Tower may be open to the public here when and if they are confirmed. A Brief History of Wainhouse Tower Born in 1817 John Edward Wainhouse inherited his Uncle’s Dyeworks on Washer Lane, Halifax in 1856. The Dyeworks were typical of the day, causing considerable pollution because of smoke emissions. Halifax was badly affected by smog. For weeks on end the smoke laden atmosphere blanketed the town, reducing sunlight and contaminating the landscape with soot and sulphur trioxide. This national problem caused the Government to introduce a Smoke Abatement Act. Wainhouse developed the idea of building a chimney 350 metres up the hillside from the Dyeworks, connected to it by an underground tunnel. Sir Henry Edwards, A wealthy neighbour of John Edward Wainhouse, made complaints about the smoke nuisance caused by the Dyeworks, leading to a feud between the two men. Mr Isaac Booth (who was also Sir Henry’s architect) was asked by Wainhouse to design and build the mill chimney. The design incorporated an internal staircase that led to four balcony features. This exacerbated the deepening feud between Wainhouse and Sir Henry. Sir Henry, an extrovert and boastful man, claimed that his private estate at Pye Nest could not be viewed from any house o the hills. Wainhouse said he would rectify this by putting an observatory at the top of his chimney. Work commenced in 1871. In 1873, as a result of the feuding; the architect Isaac Booth decided he could no longer work for either man. This led to the appointment of Richard Swarbrick Dugdale, who redesigned the upper section of the building. The new design incorporated a corbelled and balustrade balcony, surmounted by a lantern dome and finial. The building was completed on the 9th September 1875. It is estimated that over 9,000 tonnes of materials were used. The total cost is thought to be in the region of £15,000. However, by the time the building was completed, it was clear that it would never be used as a chimney. The Washer Lane Dyeworks had been sold in 1874 to the works manager Mr Henry Mossman. The sale did not include the Tower. It is thought that Mossman saw the then uncompleted building to be a liability. This point of view is difficult to understand given the fact that Mossman was then prosecuted under the Smoke Abatement Act. Mossman proved that considerable efforts were made to abate the smoke nuisance by pulling down six existing small chimneys …and erecting a large chimney in their place! John Edward Wainhouse died on 26th July 1883 at the age of 66. He as buried in the family grave at Holy Trinity Churchyard, Halifax. The gravestone is located against the boundary wall on the south side of the Church. The Tower and three acres of surrounding land was sold by auction in 1887. The Tower changed hands several times until coming under the ownership of the Halifax Corporation in 1919. During the Second World War the Tower was used by the military authorities as an observation post. As a result of the reorganisation of Local Government in 1974, Wainhouse Tower became the property of Calderdale Council. Today the Tower is used as a viewing platform; open to the public on Bank Holidays and other select days through the year
  13. Bike Libraries & Banks in Calderdale

    Across Calderdale

    Bike Libraries & Banks in Calderdale

    Following the success of Tour de France, Welcome to Yorkshire, supported by Yorkshire Bank; have helped local communities set up bike banks to a...

    Following the success of Tour de France, Welcome to Yorkshire, supported by Yorkshire Bank; have helped local communities set up bike banks to allow free bike hire.

    Used bikes are donated for free and then reconditioned and hired out, allowing children and adults to learn to ride, get fit or just enjoy their natural environment on a bike.

    Calderdale has two bike banks located at:

    The Active Calderdale Library at Halifax is open 10am -1pm on the first Saturday of each month and run by West Yorkshire Fire & Rescue Service in collaboration with Calderdale Council.To book a bike and for enquiries (including donating a bike) please email bikelibrary@calderdale.gov.uk

    Bikes are also available for hire from:

    The Bicycle Den – along the Rochdale canal towpath in Hebden Bridge

    We Cycle offers electric bike hire to help tackle Calderdale’s hills. These fantastic sturdy bikes help to tackle the steeper inclines of the area and four sites have now been confirmed as hubs for the electric bike scheme. Pairs of bikes are available at:

    • The New Delight Inn, Blackshaw Head
    • The Hare & Hounds Inn, Lane Ends
    • The Cross Inn, Heptonstall
  14. Calder & Hebble Navigation

    Sowerby Bridge

    Calder & Hebble Navigation

    The Calder and Hebble Navigation runs for 21 miles from Wakefield to Sowerby Bridge, Yorkshire. It has 27 locks and a number of flood locks. The...
    The Calder and Hebble Navigation runs for 21 miles from Wakefield to Sowerby Bridge, Yorkshire. It has 27 locks and a number of flood locks. There is a towpath all the way which makes it a great flat walking route. You can do short sections by using local buses to get you to the start and finish of your walk.
  15. The Sunken Garden at Manor Heath Park

    Halifax

    Manor Heath Park

    Open all year round, Manor Heath Park is a nineteen acre Green Flag Award and Yorkshire in Bloom Gold Award winning park, featuring

      <...

    Open all year round, Manor Heath Park is a nineteen acre Green Flag Award and Yorkshire in Bloom Gold Award winning park, featuring

    • a woodland walk and wild flower area, planted with over thirty species of wild flowers and bulbs
    • a well-equipped children's play area for all abilities
    • a water park and sand pit (from April to October)
    • outdoor gym
    • plenty of spots for the perfect picnic
    • The Jungle Experience
    • The Walled Garden
    • The Flutterbites Cafe

    Entrance to the park is FREE. Entrance to the Jungle Experience is £1 per person, for everyone 3 years old and over.

    All year round opening times for The Jungle Experience and Walled Garden are:

    Opening time:10 am every day.

    Closing times: last entry 3.30pm, closed 3.45pm every day except Friday.. Friday closing: last entry 3pm and closed 3.15pm.

    Educational visits to Manor Heath for schools covering the national curriculum can be arranged by Phoning 01422 365631 or emailing parks@calderdale.gov.uk. Booking is essential.


  16. Halifax Gibbet

    Halifax

    Halifax Gibbet

    Imagine a market day in Halifax. Two thieves are being led from the gaol and in turn, forced to lie with their heads between two upright posts. Abo...
    Imagine a market day in Halifax. Two thieves are being led from the gaol and in turn, forced to lie with their heads between two upright posts. Above, a fearsome blade is glinting in the sunlight. A horse, yoked to a rope, wrenches out the security pin and the blade slices down..! The date was 30th April 1650 and Halifax Gibbet had claimed its last victim. The Halifax gibbet was an early guillotine. The Lord of the Manor possessed the authority to execute summarily by decapitation any thief who was caught with stolen goods to the value of 13½d or more, or who confessed to having stolen goods of at least that value. Decapitation was a fairly common method of execution in England, but Halifax was unusual in that it employed a guillotine-like machine that appears to have been unique in the country, and it continued to decapitate petty criminals until the mid-17th century. A 15 foot high replica of the Gibbet has been constructed on the original site at the bottom of Gibbet Street. To find the Gibbet; from Halifax town centre, take Pellon Lane, turning left onto Bedford Street North. The Gibbet is at the end of the street, to your left, on the junction with Gibbet Street. The Gibbet’s original blade has been preserved and is on display at Bankfield Museum, Halifax.

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