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  1. Hartwells B&B

    Halifax

    Hartwells B&B

    A welcoming and comfortable accommodation in a quiet area half a mile from the picturesque and historic village of Luddenden. A welcoming and co...
    A welcoming and comfortable accommodation in a quiet area half a mile from the picturesque and historic village of Luddenden. A welcoming and comfortable accommodation in a quiet area 0.5 miles from the picturesque and historic village of Luddenden. Luddendenfoot has links with the Bronte family (historic novelists from Haworth – 10 miles). We are situated 6 miles from Halifax and 4 miles from Hebden Bridge – just off A646. Easy access to Rochdale Canal, National Rail Network (Mytholmroyd – 2 miles) and M62 motorway. Nearest bus stop 100 yards. National cycling (Route 66) runs through Luddendenfoot. A choice of 2 bedrooms:- - 1 on ground floor with ensuite shower and private facilities – double bed - 1 on first floor with full ensuite facilities – king size bed - Both have hospitality tray, TV, radio alarm clock, mini cooler and hairdryer. - Entensive breakfast menu provided. - Packed lunches provided by prior arrangement with the owners. - Off street parking available.
  2. The Piece Hall Photo by Paul White Photography

    Halifax

    The Piece Hall

    The Piece Hall is unique. A Grade I listed Georgian masterpiece and the oldest remaining cloth hall in Britain.

    Following a multi-millio...

    The Piece Hall is unique. A Grade I listed Georgian masterpiece and the oldest remaining cloth hall in Britain.

    Following a multi-million pound transformation project, Britain's magnificent and last surviving cloth hall is ready to welcome visitors again.

    The Grade I listed structure has stood at the heart of Halifax since 1779 and has now re-opened as a world class cultural, heritage and leisure destination.

    The huge open-air courtyard is surrounded by a mix of independent bars, restaurants, cafes, galleries and shops. The stories of Georgian Halifax are told in the specially created exhibition spaces, while the central courtyard plays host to a year-round events programme of music, dance, film and spectacle for up to 7,500 people at a time.

    Click here to watch a short video about the reopening of The Piece Hall

  3. The Book Corner & Bookworms

    Halifax

    The Book Corner & Bookworms

    The Book Corner is an independent bookshop selling a wide range of both fiction and non-fiction titles. Joined to Bookworms, a dedicated childr...
    The Book Corner is an independent bookshop selling a wide range of both fiction and non-fiction titles. Joined to Bookworms, a dedicated children’s bookshop, the team have created a unique space for the whole family to browse their favourite books. If they haven’t got it on the shelf they offer a free next day ordering service. Also stocking a beautiful range of stationery, notebooks, cards and literary gifts for all ages.
  4. Shibden Hall View @ Hough House, Room 1

    Halifax

    Shibden Hall View @ Hough House

    Shibden Hall View offers five luxury en-suite rooms in a character property with exceptional views of Shibden Hall and its grounds. There is fre...
    Shibden Hall View offers five luxury en-suite rooms in a character property with exceptional views of Shibden Hall and its grounds. There is free WI-FI throughout the property. All rooms have 32 inch flat screen smart television, mini-fridge, complimentary bottled water, tea and coffee making facilities, hairdryer and complimentary bath/shower gel and shampoo. An iron and ironing board is available on request. There is limited gated parking and free on street parking directly outside the property. Children and infants are welcome to stay, as are dogs. Please contact us to discuss our terms and conditions. Your hosts, Philip & Adele Hopkins, have converted the adjoining coach house into our new home so we live on site and can give our full care and attention to our business and guests. We hope you will love our property as much as we do, have a great stay with us and enjoy the many great attractions Calderdale has to offer.
  5. Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum

    Halifax

    Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum

    Please note that the Museum will be closing to the public from 20th March until further notice....

    Please note that the Museum will be closing to the public from 20th March until further notice.

    Representing over 300 years of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, since its raising in 1702, this museum tells the stories of the soldiers who served using their own words.

    The ‘Iron Duke’, Arthur Wellesley, was the Colonel of the 33rd which became, after his death, the only Regiment to be named after a person not of the Royal Blood.

    Displays include items relating to the Duke himself and to the rich and varied history of the regiment, including the campaigns of 33rd and 76th foot.

    The Duke of Wellington’s Regiment has a long association with the town of Halifax and its location within Bankfield Museum complements the wider history on display here.

    FREE Admission

  6. Bottomley's-Eyewear-Boutique

    Halifax

    Bottomley's Eyewear Boutique

    Bottomley's Eyewear Boutqiue travels the world to find the best glasses that you can't buy from the high street. If you want eyewear that you fe...
    Bottomley's Eyewear Boutqiue travels the world to find the best glasses that you can't buy from the high street. If you want eyewear that you feel and look great in then they can help you find the perfect pair with an exciting, revolutionary method. Book an appointment and find your perfect spectacles at a much more relaxed pace.
  7. Wainhouse Tower, Halifax photo by Alastair Wallace

    Halifax

    Wainhouse Tower

    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The ...
    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The structure was never actually used as a working chimney and as such, is regarded by many as one of Britain's finest follies. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Wainhouse Tower was open to the public on the Bank Holidays, for those brave enough to tackle the 403 steps to the viewing gallery at the top, the stunning views make it well worth the climb. We hope that it will be possible to reopen the Tower to visitors in 2021 and will add any dates the Tower may be open to the public here when and if they are confirmed. A Brief History of Wainhouse Tower Born in 1817 John Edward Wainhouse inherited his Uncle’s Dyeworks on Washer Lane, Halifax in 1856. The Dyeworks were typical of the day, causing considerable pollution because of smoke emissions. Halifax was badly affected by smog. For weeks on end the smoke laden atmosphere blanketed the town, reducing sunlight and contaminating the landscape with soot and sulphur trioxide. This national problem caused the Government to introduce a Smoke Abatement Act. Wainhouse developed the idea of building a chimney 350 metres up the hillside from the Dyeworks, connected to it by an underground tunnel. Sir Henry Edwards, A wealthy neighbour of John Edward Wainhouse, made complaints about the smoke nuisance caused by the Dyeworks, leading to a feud between the two men. Mr Isaac Booth (who was also Sir Henry’s architect) was asked by Wainhouse to design and build the mill chimney. The design incorporated an internal staircase that led to four balcony features. This exacerbated the deepening feud between Wainhouse and Sir Henry. Sir Henry, an extrovert and boastful man, claimed that his private estate at Pye Nest could not be viewed from any house o the hills. Wainhouse said he would rectify this by putting an observatory at the top of his chimney. Work commenced in 1871. In 1873, as a result of the feuding; the architect Isaac Booth decided he could no longer work for either man. This led to the appointment of Richard Swarbrick Dugdale, who redesigned the upper section of the building. The new design incorporated a corbelled and balustrade balcony, surmounted by a lantern dome and finial. The building was completed on the 9th September 1875. It is estimated that over 9,000 tonnes of materials were used. The total cost is thought to be in the region of £15,000. However, by the time the building was completed, it was clear that it would never be used as a chimney. The Washer Lane Dyeworks had been sold in 1874 to the works manager Mr Henry Mossman. The sale did not include the Tower. It is thought that Mossman saw the then uncompleted building to be a liability. This point of view is difficult to understand given the fact that Mossman was then prosecuted under the Smoke Abatement Act. Mossman proved that considerable efforts were made to abate the smoke nuisance by pulling down six existing small chimneys …and erecting a large chimney in their place! John Edward Wainhouse died on 26th July 1883 at the age of 66. He as buried in the family grave at Holy Trinity Churchyard, Halifax. The gravestone is located against the boundary wall on the south side of the Church. The Tower and three acres of surrounding land was sold by auction in 1887. The Tower changed hands several times until coming under the ownership of the Halifax Corporation in 1919. During the Second World War the Tower was used by the military authorities as an observation post. As a result of the reorganisation of Local Government in 1974, Wainhouse Tower became the property of Calderdale Council. Today the Tower is used as a viewing platform; open to the public on Bank Holidays and other select days through the year
  8. Jewella

    Halifax

    Jewella

    Jewella is an emporium of beautiful jewellery and accessories from leading brands in the UK. Think fashionable statement necklaces and stunning pie...
    Jewella is an emporium of beautiful jewellery and accessories from leading brands in the UK. Think fashionable statement necklaces and stunning pieces encrusted with semi-precious stones and Swarovski crystals. Add glamour to your wardrobe with contemporary and vintage inspired pieces.
  9. Dyer's Cottage, Pye Nest, Halifax

    Halifax

    Dyer's Cottage

    A beautiful, spacious one bedroom character cottage, with a garden and WiFi, in the well regarded area of Pye Nest, between Halifax and Sowerby Bri...
    A beautiful, spacious one bedroom character cottage, with a garden and WiFi, in the well regarded area of Pye Nest, between Halifax and Sowerby Bridge; offers short term business, holiday or visiting family lets. No longer wonder where to stay - experience the ultimate in luxury and comfort, with excellent access to transport, shopping, pubs and restaurants. The cottage, originally part of a 17th century farmhouse, is newly renovated and is a delightful mix of traditional features and contemporary living and offers the visitor a cosy, characterful alternative to a hotel yet provides the same standard of comfort. A well behaved dog (or possibly 2 tiny ones) is welcome too but not in the bedroom. We provide bowls, towels, toys, furniture throws and holiday name tags. However please do contact the owner before booking. Email; dyerscottage@outlook.com
  10. Halifax Music Heritage Trail

    Halifax

    Halifax Music Heritage Trail

    Halifax has a surprising and quite amazing music history. From Dusty Springfield, Rod Stewart, Iggy Pop to Joy Division, Pulp, The Cure, The Jackso...
    Halifax has a surprising and quite amazing music history. From Dusty Springfield, Rod Stewart, Iggy Pop to Joy Division, Pulp, The Cure, The Jacksons, the list of artists who have played the town is long and diverse. The Halifax Music Heritage Trail, created by Michael Ainsworth and Trevor Simpson, celebrates this important cultural history of our town.
  11. Gingerbread

    Halifax

    Gingerbread

    Gingerbread can create spaces in your home that are elegant, desirable and yet remain functional and practical. They have an eclectic range of prod...
    Gingerbread can create spaces in your home that are elegant, desirable and yet remain functional and practical. They have an eclectic range of products that enables them to serve all tastes and budgets, from the faded elegance of aged linens, antiques & vintage pieces to contemporary fabrics and wall coverings that are digitally printed and environmentally-friendly. Gingerbread have a broad network of suppliers and support several cottage industries. This includes a unique partnership with Ryburn Valley Furniture, who design and create beautiful, bespoke Kitchens, Bedrooms & furniture to compliment your home, lifestyle & taste. Gingerbread’s interior styling service is available to make the whole experience of changing and moving homes easy and enjoyable and to create a bespoke vision for you. The team offer an initial consultation either at The Piece Hall or in your home and can create your dream interior by offering a full project management service.
  12. Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax

    Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnific...
    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnificent 180ft tower and spire which is enriched with sculpture. Free guided tours of Halifax Town Hall can be arranged to help you learn more about its fascinating history. Please contact the Mayor's Office on 01422 393022.
  13. Creative Crystals

    Halifax

    Creative Crystals

    Creative Crystals began trading in The Piece Hall in 1993. Stocking a wide selection of gemstones, crystals, minerals and jewellery from around...
    Creative Crystals began trading in The Piece Hall in 1993. Stocking a wide selection of gemstones, crystals, minerals and jewellery from around the world, we also sell minerals in their natural state and also polished decorative items made from semi-precious gemstones, some of which are made into unique pieces of jewellery.
  14. Lightcliffe Tower, Old St Matthews Church - Resting Place of Ann Walker

    Halifax

    Lightcliffe Tower, Old St Matthews Church - Resting Place of Ann Walker

    Ann Walker’s grandfather, William, largely funded the Georgian Lightcliffe Old St Matthew Church, which was erected in 1775 and replaced a...

    Ann Walker’s grandfather, William, largely funded the Georgian Lightcliffe Old St Matthew Church, which was erected in 1775 and replaced an earlier, Tudor foundation.

    William also built Cliffe Hill just a short walk away, where Ann Walker lived. Ann and her family worshipped at St Matthew’s Church and had family pews.

    After becoming the companion and wife of Anne Lister of Shibden Hall, the couple had a green velvet-lined pew installed at St Matthew’s so they could worship together there.

    Ann died in February 1854 and was buried in the church, according to her memorial plaque “under the pulpit”. The exact location of this pulpit is the subject of debate, as the church was replaced in 1880 with the current church building.

    The old St Matthew’s church was used as a mortuary chapel, but it fell into decay after suffering serious damage from a storm in the 1960’s. Vandalism and theft followed and the church was demolished in the early 1970s.

    Fortunately the ‘Friends of Friendless Churches’ rescued the memorials from the walls of the church and they are now stored in Lightcliffe Tower, the only remaining part of the old St Matthew Church.

    A memorial stone has been placed on the spot where it is thought that Ann lies and the brass memorial plaque to her now hangs high inside the tower. The plaque is hard to decipher but reads:

    In memory of Ann Walker of Cliffe Hill who was born May 20th 1803 and died February 25th 1854

    and is buried underneath the pulpit in this church.

    And of her niece, Mary who died June 6th 1845 and is buried in this churchyard.

    And of her nephews George Sackville (Sutherland) who died in 1843 aged 12,

    John Walker who died in 1836 aged 1 year and are buried in Kirkmichael, Rosshire,

    the children of George MacKay and Elizabeth Sutherland

    Sadly there are no known images of Ann Walker. Most of what we know about her comes from Anne Lister's diaires and letters. Ann Walker is portrayed by Sophie Rundle in the BBC ONE/ HBO drma Gentleman Jack.

    You will find Lightcliffe Tower along Wakefield Road, in Lightcliffe, Halifax. The tower is located on your left (as you are driving out of Halifax) just before Till Carr Lane, opposite the Sun Country Inn, HX3 8TH.

  15. The Shears Inn B&B

    Halifax

    The Shears Inn B&B

    Shears Inn in Halifax, West Yorkshire, is a hidden gem for those seeking the quintessential English pub. Oozing genuine 'olde worlde' charm and app...
    Shears Inn in Halifax, West Yorkshire, is a hidden gem for those seeking the quintessential English pub. Oozing genuine 'olde worlde' charm and appeal, this is probably the oldest Inn in Halifax and it offers three en-suite bed & breakfast rooms. Shears Inn Paris Gates is somewhere you would love to visit, firstly the challenge of finding it, the first thrill, spotting it at the bottom of the cobbled road just after passing a large mill chimney, You would never expect to find an Inn in this unique location, The Shears Inn offers three en-suite rooms, two with King-sized beds and one with a Super-King. All of the bedrooms have their own en-suite bathroom, 32" flat screen TV and free WI-FI. All rooms refurbished to a high standard. There is daily housekeeping and staff are available around the clock.
  16. Halifax Gibbet

    Halifax

    Halifax Gibbet

    Imagine a market day in Halifax. Two thieves are being led from the gaol and in turn, forced to lie with their heads between two upright posts. Abo...
    Imagine a market day in Halifax. Two thieves are being led from the gaol and in turn, forced to lie with their heads between two upright posts. Above, a fearsome blade is glinting in the sunlight. A horse, yoked to a rope, wrenches out the security pin and the blade slices down..! The date was 30th April 1650 and Halifax Gibbet had claimed its last victim. The Halifax gibbet was an early guillotine. The Lord of the Manor possessed the authority to execute summarily by decapitation any thief who was caught with stolen goods to the value of 13½d or more, or who confessed to having stolen goods of at least that value. Decapitation was a fairly common method of execution in England, but Halifax was unusual in that it employed a guillotine-like machine that appears to have been unique in the country, and it continued to decapitate petty criminals until the mid-17th century. A 15 foot high replica of the Gibbet has been constructed on the original site at the bottom of Gibbet Street. To find the Gibbet; from Halifax town centre, take Pellon Lane, turning left onto Bedford Street North. The Gibbet is at the end of the street, to your left, on the junction with Gibbet Street. The Gibbet’s original blade has been preserved and is on display at Bankfield Museum, Halifax.

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