Plan your stay

Grid List

1-16 of 164

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. ...
  5. 11
  1. Happydays Cycles

    Sowerby Bridge

    Happydays Cycles

    Welcome to Happydays Cycles, home to the Bike Shop & Cycle Café in Sowerby Bridge along with various projects to get people out and about. Happy...
    Welcome to Happydays Cycles, home to the Bike Shop & Cycle Café in Sowerby Bridge along with various projects to get people out and about. Happydays has a Bike Library where you can hire a bicycle from half a day to a week. You can also donate your old or unused bikes to the Library, so others can benefit from them. Happy Days Cycles is a social enterprise business, our main outlet is the shop and café in Sowerby Bridge. All profits go towards funding our work amongst the homeless in West Yorkshire. We are committed to journey with people to develop a love for cycling and enable them as individuals to reach independence. We value partnerships with churches, individuals, volunteers, local government and other organisations to promote integration into the wider community. We would love to welcome you to our café. Pop in to try scrumptious locally sourced cakes, fresh coffee or a delicious lunch! Happydays Café also hosts local groups such as 'Knit N Natter' and exciting community events for all ages.
  2. Old Cragg Hall Barn, Cragg Vale.

    Hebden Bridge

    Old Cragg Hall Barn

    A fabulous barn conversion now available as 5 Star self-catering holiday accommodation in an elevated position in Cragg Vale, an area of oustanding...
    A fabulous barn conversion now available as 5 Star self-catering holiday accommodation in an elevated position in Cragg Vale, an area of oustanding natural beauty near Hebden Bridge in West Yorkshire. The surrounding countryside is ideal for exploring by foot; The Calderdale Way 50-mile walking route passes close by and there are many places of interest to be found within easy reach including the picturesque village of Haworth, once home to the famous Bronte sisters. Hebden Bridge itself has a rich industrial history and rapidly developed during the industrial revolution as mill owners made use of the valley sides to house their expanding workforce, giving the town its distinctive look. The town has now left its industrial past behind and is home to a unique range of shops, fine restaurants and traditional pubs. Old Cragg Hall Barn comprises of a large entrance hallway, master bedroom with king size four poster bed and en-suite shower room and two further bedrooms that can be configured as twin or super king size rooms. There is also a house bathroom with bath/shower. The large open plan living space is situated on the first floor, with a full glazed wall making the most of the fabulous views across Cragg Vale valley. This floor contains a well equipped kitchen, dining area and stylish and elegant living area with wood burning stove, ideal for those cosy evenings in. Outside there is a large private patio area with tables, chairs and a barbecue with parking available for several cars. Facilities include a flat screen HD TV, Blu ray DVD/CD player, Freesat HD, wifi Internet, separate TV/DVD in the master bedroom and a small library of books and DVDs. The kitchen has a fridge and freezer, dishwasher, electric double oven and induction hob, and there is a washer/dryer in the understairs cupboard. Prices include all bed linen, towels, fuel, complimentary toiletries and cleaning materials.
  3. The Fleece Countryside Inn

    Barkisland

    The Fleece Countryside Inn

    The Fleece Countryside Inn is a stunning pub, restaurant, hotel and wedding venue in Barkisland, Calderdale, offering splendid views over the Rybur...
    The Fleece Countryside Inn is a stunning pub, restaurant, hotel and wedding venue in Barkisland, Calderdale, offering splendid views over the Ryburn Valley. We are located just a short distance from the route of The Calderdale Way, the 50-mile walking route which circles the whole borough of Calderdale. Our modern Yorkshire style of cooking sees every dish made from fresh within our kitchen. Time and care has been given to every plate of food brought to your table, no matter how large or small. A past winner of Yorkshire's Favourite Pub Award at Welcome to Yorkshire's White Rose Awards , the Fleece Countryside Inn is a must-visit!
  4. ROKTFACE

    Brighouse

    ROKTFACE

    UK’s highest man-made outdoor climbing wall right here at ROKT. Higher than both the Tower of London and the Angel of the North, the towering RO...
    UK’s highest man-made outdoor climbing wall right here at ROKT. Higher than both the Tower of London and the Angel of the North, the towering ROKTFACE wall at ROKT climbing centre in Brighouse, West Yorkshire, will see people climb routes up to 36m. The cost to climb ROKTFACE for competent rope climbers will be £15 for up to 1 hour 30 minutes and that price includes full entry to climb inside ROKT Climbing Centre. For beginners/novice climbers, you will need an instructed session to climb ROKTFACE. These can be pre-booked and cost £30 for one person, £50 for two people, £60 for three people or £70 for four. Basically, the more people the cheaper it is. Group bookings (schools/team building/stag/hen/Scouts/Guides etc) taken too. The climbing wall is being created on one of the faces of a sky-scraping disused grain silos, which sits alongside the Calder and Hebble Navigation and close to the route of The Calderdale Way. Around 2,500 bolts are being drilled to create up to 21 unique routes. The £75,000 project is being led by ROKT climbing in partnership with Calderdale Council to help raise the profile and participation of healthy activity as well as tourism for the area. It will give daredevils views of up to around 20 miles across Yorkshire – the UK’s biggest county. The routes have been set by respected climbers and range from 28m to 36m high. Email - climbing@rokt.co.uk
  5. Stoodley Pike Monument

    Todmorden

    Stoodley Pike Monument

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The...

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The monument was designed in 1854 by local architect James Green, and completed in 1856 at the end of the Crimean War.

    The monument replaced an earlier structure, commemorating the defeat of Napoleon and the surrender of Paris. It was completed in 1815, after the Battle of Waterloo, but collapsed in 1854 after decades of weathering and a lightning strike.

    You can only reach the Pike on foot, as there is no vehicular or bicycle access to the monument. Stoodley Pike is accessible by well-defined Right of Way footpaths. The Pennine Way also passes Stoodley Pike. There are many walking routes to the Pike from Todmorden, Hebden Bridge and Mytholmroyd. Walking guides to all these routes available from local Visitor Centres and the Heart of the Pennines online shop.

    Stoodley Pike Monument contains a spiral staircase of 39 steps, accessed from its north side. If you visit, please be aware that several of the internal steps are in darkness, so it’s useful to have a torch to light your way, as there are no windows. The entrance to the balcony is on the Monument’s west face, some 40 feet above ground level. The views are well worth the walk and the climb!

  6. The Yorkshire Gallery

    Halifax

    The Yorkshire Gallery

    The Yorkshire Gallery is a warm and inviting independent contemporary gallery. It's a family run business that is really passionate about Yorksh...
    The Yorkshire Gallery is a warm and inviting independent contemporary gallery. It's a family run business that is really passionate about Yorkshire and proud to showcase work by artists/designers & makers that have connections with our wonderful county. Supporting and nurturing established artists and those just graduating, The Yorkshire Gallery showcase their work in a carefully curated space with a regular programme of exhibitions that reflects their passion for fine art, contemporary jewellery and engaging craft.
  7. Wainhouse Tavern

    Halifax

    Wainhouse Tavern

    Your friendly local in the heart of Pye Nest!

    The Wainhouse Tavern was built in 1877 as a home for industrialist John Wainhouse, who cre...

    Your friendly local in the heart of Pye Nest!

    The Wainhouse Tavern was built in 1877 as a home for industrialist John Wainhouse, who created the nearby Wainhouse Tower.

    All our food is homemade from scratch, our vegetables and meat are from local vendors to ensure we have the freshest ingredients. We have vegetarian options and gluten free options available daily.

    Serving a wide range of cask ales, many from local breweries. Lagers include Kaltenberg, San Miguel and more on draught, Budweiser, Peroni and more in bottles. Ciders include Strongbow, Kingstone Press on draught, Magners and Rekorderlig in bottles. Alternatively why not try our selection of competitively priced house and premium wines.... or tackle our range of malt whiskies, gins and rums.

  8. Deli Indulge

    Halifax

    Deli Indulge

    A great place to eat and meet, very welcoming with very reasonable prices. Come and give us a try - you won't be disappointed.
    A great place to eat and meet, very welcoming with very reasonable prices. Come and give us a try - you won't be disappointed.
  9. The Coffee Station, Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge

    The Coffee Station

    'The Coffee Station” the cafe at Hebden Bridge railway station, is open from 6am to 2pm Monday to Friday, and for slightly shorter hours on Saturda...
    'The Coffee Station” the cafe at Hebden Bridge railway station, is open from 6am to 2pm Monday to Friday, and for slightly shorter hours on Saturdays. It serves hot and cold drinks, light lunches, all day hot snacks, home-made sandwiches and cakes, and also newspapers and greeting cards. Service is warm, friendly and efficient, and prices are very reasonable – a cup of tea is only 90 pence, a filter coffee £1. The cafe is the first ever winner of a prestigious national award; from Railfuture – the national rail passenger organisation that campaigns for better and more trains and a bigger and better railway. Station cafe customers across Britain were invited to vote on Railfuture’s website for their favourite independent station cafe. “The Coffee Station” beat other popular cafes from across the country and received over 500 votes from customers, over three times as many as the second place cafe (in Portsmouth, Hampshire).
  10. Stanley's Kitchen

    Ripponden

    Stanley's Kitchen

    Stanley’s Kitchen is a small, newly opened, family run tea-room in the heart of the lovely village of Ripponden, West Yorkshire. As you walk throu...
    Stanley’s Kitchen is a small, newly opened, family run tea-room in the heart of the lovely village of Ripponden, West Yorkshire. As you walk through the door, you will sense a hint of nostalgia in its décor with tea served in pretty china tea cups and our scrumptious afternoon teas are served on delicate china cake stands. Our aim at Stanley’s Kitchen is to prepare and serve fresh food, in a clean, friendly, welcoming environment, to our valued customers. We always use, where we can, locally sourced produce and make our own delicious cakes on the premises, using only the best ingredients.
  11. Sheridan's Tea Room, Halifax

    Halifax

    Sheridan's Tea Room

    Sheridan's Tea Room offers you delicious Cream and Afternoon Teas in a traditional surroundings with friendly service. Vegetarian options are av...
    Sheridan's Tea Room offers you delicious Cream and Afternoon Teas in a traditional surroundings with friendly service. Vegetarian options are available. We do not accept cards, so cash payments only, please.
  12. Rokt Climbing Gym

    Brighouse

    ROKT Climbing Gym

    Adrenalin pumping, heart stopping, fear inducing! The unique Rokt Climbing Gym offers indoor climbing at its best and the highest outdoor climbi...

    Adrenalin pumping, heart stopping, fear inducing! The unique Rokt Climbing Gym offers indoor climbing at its best and the highest outdoor climbing wall in the UK: the ROKTFACE!

    Whether you're an experienced climber, you're a little rusty, or you've never climbed before - old or young are welcome to use our facilities.

    Bring the little ones… The Kids Attics is a great space for your kids to play and climb in safety. There are small climbing wall, mini boulders, a ball pool and seating. So why not bring the little ones with you next time the old ones are on a session or off climbing. We have tea, coffee & snacks available from reception.

    Climbers now have an Olympic-class bouldering and training arena to thrive in after a new £100,000 facility opened its doors. Stretching across the top two floors, the Northlight at ROKT has been created in Rokt's colossal loft. It features “next-level bouldering”, with 1/4 km2 of curved and acutely angled bouldering walls, slabs, barrels and overhangs using the latest holds and coatings.

    Whether you’ve never climbed anything more than a fence or you compete in national competitions, there's something for you at ROKT!

    We're located only a hundred metres from the route of The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route that circles the whole borough. Drop in and see us if you're passing by.

    Click here to watch a short video about Rokt Climbing Gym from The Yorkshire Post.

  13. The New Delight Inn

    Hebden Bridge

    The New Delight Inn

    Situated in a peaceful and idyllic location, The New Delight provides a child friendly atmosphere and a fantastic range of freshly cooked food for ...
    Situated in a peaceful and idyllic location, The New Delight provides a child friendly atmosphere and a fantastic range of freshly cooked food for all of the family to enjoy. We are based in the village of Colden, situated on the picturesque moors backing Hebden Bridge and Todmorden close to The Calderdale Way. A perfect rest stop for dog walkers, hikers, cyclists or anyone in need of a refreshment. We are also connected to the very local Bridestones Brewery ensuring a wide range of ever changing ales to please every palette. We are dog, walker and cyclist friendly.
  14. eptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Heptonstall

    Heptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One...
    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One of the first octagonal chapels, it is one of the oldest Methodist churches in continuous use today. This unusual octagonal chapel is open every day. It’s tucked away at the bottom of a flight of steps off Northgate. Entry is free, with donations to the upkeep of the Chapel welcome. Please email Circuit Heritage Officer Mr. John Wilson regarding visits and other activities, at chme@calderdalemethodists.org.uk. Methodism in Heptonstall began with the firebrand Scot William Darney. He founded many societies on both sides of the Pennines as he travelled, preaching as he went. The Heptonstall “Darney Society” was visited by Charles and John Wesley in 1747. In these early days, Heptonstall had a preacher every sixth Sunday, with the travelling preachers receiving no stipend or allowance, eating where they could. John Wesley continued to visit Heptonstall and there were always immense crowds to hear him. The society was so successful it was decided to build a chapel. The octagon shape was then fashionable for Methodist preaching houses, as it avoided conflict with the established church. The building was finished in 1764. It was intended to hold 200 people, but by 1802 there were 337 members and over 1000 scholars. The solution was to knock down the far end of the chapel, lengthen the walls and rebuild it, preserving its octagonal shape. Heptonstall is located on The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route that circles the borough of Calderdale. Please call in to visit the Chapel if you're passing by.
  15. Dies used By the Cragg Vale Coiners

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Coiners

    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's a...
    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's activities were said to be so damaging that they threatened to wreck Britain's currency. David Hartley learnt his trade as an ironworker in Birmingham, before getting into trouble and moving back to Mytholmroyd to escape the authorities. Once returned to his home at Bell House farmhouse (which is now a bed & breakfast accommodation with educational facilities) David used ironworking as a cover to clip or file the edges from gold coins, milling the edges back so the change was all but unnoticeable, and making counterfeit coins from the shavings whilst returning the clipped coins into circulation. David’s activities soon spread to other farms, with families at nearby Hill Top Farm and Keelham Farm soon becoming involved; forming the beginnings of the gang of Cragg Vale Coiners. Local publicans also helped by placing the counterfeit coins into circulation. David Hartley seems to have been an enigmatic leader, becoming known as 'King David' Hartley and the gang’s numbers grew considerably until well over 30 individuals were involved. Rumours of the gang's activities reached the authorities, who sent an excise man named William Deighton to investigate. One of the coiners turned King’s Evidence and betrayed the gang, leading to Hartley's arrest at an Inn in Halifax on 14th October 1769. Hartley's brother Isaac offered £100 to anybody who would kill Deighton. It is alleged that the plotters planned Deighton's murder at an Inn in Mytholmroyd called Barbary's, which is now gone, but was located on the opposite side of the road to the present day Dusty Miller. On November 10th 1769 at Bull Close Lane near Halifax, Deighton was approached by two men, Matthew Normanton and Robert Thomas. Deighton was shot dead, his body also showing signs of having been stamped on. Just days later, the Government offered a reward of £100 for information leading to the arrest of the murderers and a pardon for anybody, bar the killers, who would turn King's Evidence. Over 30 people were subsequently arrested, including 'King David' Hartley, who was sentenced to death on April 6th 1770 and hanged at Tynburn, near York, on April 28th. His body is buried in the graveyard of the village of Heptonstall, above Hebden Bridge. Robert Thomas was acquitted of Deighton's murder, but was later hanged in 1774 for being a highwayman. Matthew Normanton initially fled the authorities, but was later caught and hanged in 1775. Isaac Hartley was never brought to trial due to a lack of evidence and died in 1815, aged 78. Heptonstall Museum has on display some of the original dies used by the Coiners to stamp their gold discs into coins, as well as panels telling more of their story.
  16. Onlineauthentic

    Halifax

    Onlineauthentic

    OnlineAuthentic specialise in memorabilia sales, event management, celebrity signings, guest speaker management, auctions, fundraising and charity ...
    OnlineAuthentic specialise in memorabilia sales, event management, celebrity signings, guest speaker management, auctions, fundraising and charity events. They guarantee authenticity of all memorabilia, proven by a unique certificate of authenticity with every item.

Grid List

1-16 of 164

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. ...
  5. 11