Plan your stay

Grid List

14 Item(s)

  1. Dies used By the Cragg Vale Coiners

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Coiners

    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's a...
    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's activities were said to be so damaging that they threatened to wreck Britain's currency. David Hartley learnt his trade as an ironworker in Birmingham, before getting into trouble and moving back to Mytholmroyd to escape the authorities. Once returned to his home at Bell House farmhouse (which is now a bed & breakfast accommodation with educational facilities) David used ironworking as a cover to clip or file the edges from gold coins, milling the edges back so the change was all but unnoticeable, and making counterfeit coins from the shavings whilst returning the clipped coins into circulation. David’s activities soon spread to other farms, with families at nearby Hill Top Farm and Keelham Farm soon becoming involved; forming the beginnings of the gang of Cragg Vale Coiners. Local publicans also helped by placing the counterfeit coins into circulation. David Hartley seems to have been an enigmatic leader, becoming known as 'King David' Hartley and the gang’s numbers grew considerably until well over 30 individuals were involved. Rumours of the gang's activities reached the authorities, who sent an excise man named William Deighton to investigate. One of the coiners turned King’s Evidence and betrayed the gang, leading to Hartley's arrest at an Inn in Halifax on 14th October 1769. Hartley's brother Isaac offered £100 to anybody who would kill Deighton. It is alleged that the plotters planned Deighton's murder at an Inn in Mytholmroyd called Barbary's, which is now gone, but was located on the opposite side of the road to the present day Dusty Miller. On November 10th 1769 at Bull Close Lane near Halifax, Deighton was approached by two men, Matthew Normanton and Robert Thomas. Deighton was shot dead, his body also showing signs of having been stamped on. Just days later, the Government offered a reward of £100 for information leading to the arrest of the murderers and a pardon for anybody, bar the killers, who would turn King's Evidence. Over 30 people were subsequently arrested, including 'King David' Hartley, who was sentenced to death on April 6th 1770 and hanged at Tynburn, near York, on April 28th. His body is buried in the graveyard of the village of Heptonstall, above Hebden Bridge. Robert Thomas was acquitted of Deighton's murder, but was later hanged in 1774 for being a highwayman. Matthew Normanton initially fled the authorities, but was later caught and hanged in 1775. Isaac Hartley was never brought to trial due to a lack of evidence and died in 1815, aged 78. Heptonstall Museum has on display some of the original dies used by the Coiners to stamp their gold discs into coins, as well as panels telling more of their story.
  2. Ted's House

    Mytholmroyd

    Ted's House

    Conveniently situated in the charming town of Mytholmroyd, Ted's House is spacious and welcoming, the former childhood home of the late Poet Laurea...
    Conveniently situated in the charming town of Mytholmroyd, Ted's House is spacious and welcoming, the former childhood home of the late Poet Laureate Ted Hughes. Ted Hughes lived here until the age of seven, with his brother and sister. Before his death in 1998, he said "My first seven years shaped everything". Camping trips with his elder brother in the rolling moors and surrounding countryside are said to have significantly influenced his poetry, making this the ideal home for budding writers or Hughes' fans to draw inspiration from the area. Beautifully furnished by an interior designer, the house has been fully renovated to incorporate a beautiful bathroom and en-suite, making it perfect for couples to share. The owner has thoughfully provided a desk and wireless broadband access in Ted's former second floor bedroom - the perfect spot to return to after exploring the area. Mytholmroyd is situated just a mile from the picturesque Hebden Bridge with bustling independent shops, quaint tea rooms, art galleries, pubs and a small cinema. The small cellar is suitable for the storage of bikes, boots etc. and one dog is welcome.
  3. Far Moorside Farm, Cragg Vale

    Mytholmroyd

    Far Moorside Farm B&B

    Far Moorside Farm is reached along a private track and visitors have ample parking. The visitors' entrance hall has room for outdoor and wet weathe...
    Far Moorside Farm is reached along a private track and visitors have ample parking. The visitors' entrance hall has room for outdoor and wet weather gear; there is a private cloakroom. Please no stiletto heels on the new oak floor. From the hall you walk in to the spacious guest lounge with large real fireplace, TV, books and games. The staircase is reached through the dining area; guest rooms are located on the upper floor. Please be aware, Far Moorside has livestock so we ask guests not to bring dogs. We have our own. We offer stabling and turnout for six horses and you can ride straight on to the moor. Cyclists may use cosy barns for secure cycle storage. Owing to our farm being on a steep hillside, wheelchair access is not possible as there are steps to all entrances. Bedroom 1 is a double room with an oversized double bed and a sofa bed for a child or special friend. There is the usual range of beverage making equipment, the small fridge on the landing holds fresh milk and whatever guests want to put in it. An ante room with drawers and cupboards leads to a newly furnished bathroom with a lovely rainforest shower and spacious bath. Bedroom 2 has twin beds, room cupboards, a nice view and the usual array of tea and coffee raw materials; milk in the landing fridge as for our double bedroom. The bathroom for the twin room only has a shower but there is a family size sauna for guests' use! Both rooms offer fantastic views over the Upper Calder Valley. Arrival times may be extended beyond the 2pm-8pm period subject to arrangement.
  4. eptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Heptonstall

    Heptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One...
    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One of the first octagonal chapels, it is one of the oldest Methodist churches in continuous use today. This unusual octagonal chapel is open every day. It’s tucked away at the bottom of a flight of steps off Northgate. Entry is free, with donations to the upkeep of the Chapel welcome. Please email Circuit Heritage Officer Mr. John Wilson regarding visits and other activities, at chme@calderdalemethodists.org.uk. Methodism in Heptonstall began with the firebrand Scot William Darney. He founded many societies on both sides of the Pennines as he travelled, preaching as he went. The Heptonstall “Darney Society” was visited by Charles and John Wesley in 1747. In these early days, Heptonstall had a preacher every sixth Sunday, with the travelling preachers receiving no stipend or allowance, eating where they could. John Wesley continued to visit Heptonstall and there were always immense crowds to hear him. The society was so successful it was decided to build a chapel. The octagon shape was then fashionable for Methodist preaching houses, as it avoided conflict with the established church. The building was finished in 1764. It was intended to hold 200 people, but by 1802 there were 337 members and over 1000 scholars. The solution was to knock down the far end of the chapel, lengthen the walls and rebuild it, preserving its octagonal shape. Heptonstall is located on The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route that circles the borough of Calderdale. Please call in to visit the Chapel if you're passing by.
  5. Stag Cottage

    Heptonstall

    Stag Cottage

    Stag Cottage (built c.1580) is a tiny, beautiful and historic Grade II Listed building hidden away in the ancient Pennine village of Heptonstall, j...
    Stag Cottage (built c.1580) is a tiny, beautiful and historic Grade II Listed building hidden away in the ancient Pennine village of Heptonstall, just a stone's throw from the Post Office and the two village pubs. The Cottage is reputed to be the oldest in the village, dating from the 16th Century. The cottage sleeps 3 adults (1 kingsize, 1 single) and there is also a fold up cot for infants. Gas central heating. Fully fitted kitchen with gas stove. Free parking within 50 yards of the cottage. A regular bus service runs between Heptonstall and Hebden Bridge. The old village dungeon or "lock up" situated on the lower ground floor, may be used for the storage of bicycles.
  6. Ruins of the Church of St Thomas a' Becket, Heptonstall

    Heptonstall

    Ruins of the Church of St Thomas a' Becket

    Uniquely, Heptonstall has two churches within one graveyard. At the centre of the village are the ruins of the Church of St Thomas a' Becket built ...
    Uniquely, Heptonstall has two churches within one graveyard. At the centre of the village are the ruins of the Church of St Thomas a' Becket built between 1256 and 1260. Later adaptations gave the Church two naves, two aisles and two chantry chapels as well as a tower. Following a great storm in 1847 the west face of the tower fell away. Some measure of repair took place and the church remained in use up to 1854 when the present church, St Thomas the Apostle, was completed at a cost of £7,000. The ruins of St Thomas a' Becket are carefully maintained and are open to the public. Open air services are occasionally conducted there.
  7. Ted Hughes

    Mytholmroyd

    Ted Hughes

    Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was born at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, on the 17th August 1930. He lived there unti...

    Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was born at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, on the 17th August 1930. He lived there until he was seven, when his family moved to Mexborough. During his childhood he spent many hours exploring the countryside around Mytholmroyd, and these experiences and the influences of the landscape on him were to inform much of his later poetry.

    One of the greatest poets of his generation, Hughes also wrote stories, plays, reviews and essays. He translated the work of, amongst others, Ovid, Racine, Aeschylus and Euripides. He wrote extensively for children, including the story The Iron Man, which was turned into the Disney blockbuster The Iron Giant. Hughes's interests in other art forms led to many collaborations, most famously with the artist Leonard Baskin.

    Although best known in the UK, Hughes was a writer of international standing. He won numerous awards throughout his career, including four for his final collection, Birthday Letters. Hughes became Poet Laureate in 1984 until his death on 28th October 1998.

  8. The White Lion, Heptonstall

    Heptonstall

    The White Lion, Heptonstall

    The White Lion is a traditional pub, without television, juke box, gaming machines or WiFi. We serve real ales, real ciders and have a vast coll...
    The White Lion is a traditional pub, without television, juke box, gaming machines or WiFi. We serve real ales, real ciders and have a vast collection of Gin and Whisky, along with great home made food including many vegetarian and vegan dishes. The Calderdale Way walking route passes through Heptonstall, right past the pub. The oldest part of the building is at the rear of the present layout and dates back to the early 14th Century, at which time it faced the opposite way onto the Pack Horse route from Hebden Bridge to Nelson and Burnley. This ran along the rear of the present building. In the early 15th Century the new road was constructed and the old building was extended and the present frontage constructed facing the new road. Many of the buildings along Towngate and Smithwell Lane were constructed around this time, including the Cloth Hall, which was originally a single story building. The pub was frequented by the Cragg Coiners during the late 16th Century. We have a display of dies and coins in our dining room, which is certainly worth a visit.
  9. Robin Hood Cottage

    Mytholmroyd

    Robin Hood Cottage

    Robin Hood cottage is a small 18th century farmer’s cottage with mullion windows, beams and a cosy real fire. It provides the perfect place for a r...
    Robin Hood cottage is a small 18th century farmer’s cottage with mullion windows, beams and a cosy real fire. It provides the perfect place for a relaxing break in the picturesque countryside of West Yorkshire. Close to the Pennine Way footpath and stunning moorland scenery, the cottage is a great place for walkers, cyclists or wildlife enthusiasts. It is a short drive from Hebden Bridge, ‘Bronte Country’ and the area where ‘Last Of The Summer Wine' is filmed. It is also a good centre from which to visit the Yorkshire Dales and North Yorkshire Moors. Available all year round - for three-day winter warmers or week-long holiday lets. All duvets, bed linen and towels are provided. The cottage is centrally heated by the solid fuel burning stove. Wood and coal are included in the price. Roadside parking is close at hand. Sorry, the cottage is non-smoking and does not allow pets.
  10. The-Cross-Inn-Heptonstall

    Heptonstall

    The Cross Inn

    Built in 1617 on the site of an even older hostelry, this historic Grade II listed pub offers a traditional but bright, smart and comfortable place...
    Built in 1617 on the site of an even older hostelry, this historic Grade II listed pub offers a traditional but bright, smart and comfortable place to relax. Home cooked food available: Tuesday to Sunday: 12pm - 3pm Friday to Sunday: 5pm - 7pm The Landlord's Quiz with free supper - Thursdays 8.30pm Live music most weekends. The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route that circles the borough, runs right past The Cross Inn, so call in for some food and drink whilst you're enjoying the route.
  11. Heptonstall Museum

    Heptonstall

    Heptonstall Museum

    Heptonstall Museum offers you the opportunity to expore the changing importance of Heptonstall and the surrounding area, from prehistoric times unt...
    Heptonstall Museum offers you the opportunity to expore the changing importance of Heptonstall and the surrounding area, from prehistoric times until recent day. Find out about the infamous Cragg Vale Coiners, who produced counterfeit currency and committed murder to conceal their illegal trade. Explore the temporary exhibition relating to local stories, objects and heroes. Discover the exploits of Heptonstall's Parliamentarian garrison during the English Civil War and uncover intriguing stories of the everyday lives of the people of Heptonstall and the Upper Calder Valley. Heptonstall Grammar School was established in 1642, the present building was rebuilt in 1771, where it continued to be used as a school until 1889. In 1898 it became the Yorkshire Penny Bank whose staff were careful to preserve some of the original features of the school: including a black oak desk at which pupils took their lessons which can still be found inside the Museum today. FREE Entry. Open March to October: Saturdays, Sundays and Bank Holidays 11:00 - 16:00. Closed November to February.
  12. The Barn at Whitehall Fold

    Heptonstall

    The Barn at Whitehall Fold

    Located in the village of Heptonstall, the cottage sleeps 2 adults and 2 children (plus an additional sofa bed for 2 adults for short stay) and has...
    Located in the village of Heptonstall, the cottage sleeps 2 adults and 2 children (plus an additional sofa bed for 2 adults for short stay) and has full gas central heating from a combi boiler and a multi-fuel burning stove (logs and kindling provided). It is a brand new conversion completed to the highest standards with a fully fitted kitchen and bathroom. Bicycle storage is available in an adjoining outhouse and there is free parking on site - a rarity in the centre of the village. For the non-drivers, a regular bus service runs between Heptonstall and Hebden Bridge train station. The barn has been sensitively converted in keeping with the Grade II listed status using original Yorkshire stone and has a lovely log burning stove and stone hearth. The owners will be on-hand in the adjoining house. Heptonstall is a beautiful hill top village situated in the heart of Calderdale, West Yorkshire, some 500 feet above the popular and bustling town of Hebden Bridge. The village has 2 pubs, a cafe, a village post office, a small museum and a social and bowling club. The surrounding countryside is breathtaking; ideal for walking and cycling, including the nearby National Trust owned Hardcastle Crags. There are literary links to both the Bronte family in nearby Haworth and to the late poet laureate, Ted Hughes and his wife Sylvia Plath, who is buried in the village church yard - as featured in the hit TV series Happy Valley. The unique and popular town of Hebden Bridge is just a short walk down the hill, offering dozens of independent shops, galleries, restaurants and cafes.
  13. Good Friday Pace Egg Plays

    Heptonstall

    Good Friday Heptonstall Pace Egg Plays 2020

    10th Apr 2020

    Heptonstall Pace Egg Play is a traditional Mumming Play performed in Heptonstall’s Weavers Square on Good Fridays, attracting hundreds of visitors ...
    Heptonstall Pace Egg Play is a traditional Mumming Play performed in Heptonstall’s Weavers Square on Good Fridays, attracting hundreds of visitors to the village. The Pace Egg play is not unique to Heptonstall but it is one of only a few still performed today. Good Friday, 10th April in Weavers Square . NB times are still TBC, but 2019's times were 11.15 am Heptonstall Pace Egg 12.30 pm Heptonstall Pace Egg 2.00 pm Heptonstall Pace Egg 3.00pm Midgley Pace Egg 4.00pm Heptonstall Pace Egg The Hillmillies will be dancing between the plays, The organisers reserve the right to change the times of, or cancel, any performances. In the play St George takes on contenders such as Bold Slasher, the Black Prince of Paradine and Hector. The costumes, in particular the strange headgear comprising a towering edifice garlanded with flowers, peculiar to the Calder Valley; are as much a part of the fun as the action. Violent sword fights predominate but, as ever, good triumphs over evil. Visitors are asked to not bring their cars into the village as parking is very limited. There are regular buses to Heptonstall from Hebden Bridge and visitors can walk up to Heptonstall via the Buttress, the steep cobbled pathway by Hebden Bridge Town Hall. (Please note this is a demanding walk!)
  14. Pennine Spring Music Festival

    Heptonstall

    Pennine Spring Music Festival 2020

    Starting 25th May 2020
    See all Dates

    25th - 30th May 2020 Set in the beautiful Yorkshire countryside that inspired the Bronte sisters and Ted Hughes, the Pennine Spring Music Festiv...
    25th - 30th May 2020 Set in the beautiful Yorkshire countryside that inspired the Bronte sisters and Ted Hughes, the Pennine Spring Music Festival brings together instrumentalists and singers from all over Britain for a week of convivial music-making and performing. For the first time in 2020, we are also hosting the Pennine Fringe’- two events that will take place in the village pubs. Thursday 28th May - ‘The gypsy in my soul’ 10pm in the White Lion Pub A fun mixture of light opera, klezmer and more Saturday 30th May - ‘Nostalgia’ 4pm at the Cross Inn Pub A performance of the best loved romantic songs . These events are hosted by David Owen Lewis and friends and admission to both events will be free with a retiring collection. Please see the Festival's website for full details of the 2020 programme.

Grid List

14 Item(s)

Sign up to be the first to hear all about the latest news and events

Trigger popup