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  1. Mankinholes YHA

    Todmorden

    Mankinholes YHA

    Once the local manor house dating back to the late 16th century, this refurbished hostel on the edge of moorland is a charming place to stay. Th...
    Once the local manor house dating back to the late 16th century, this refurbished hostel on the edge of moorland is a charming place to stay. The Pennine Way and The Calderdale Way are close by and you’ll find an abundance of other footpaths, bridleways and packhorse trails to explore. Despite the quiet, rural location, YHA Mankinholes is within easy reach of other attractions should the weather prove inclement. Eureka!, the National Children’s Museum in Halifax, Shibden Estate, The Piece Hall, Bankfield Museum, Haworth, The Keighley & Worth Valley Steam Railway and Hollingworth Lake & Activity Centre are all nearby. YHA Mankinholes offers 8 bedrooms, each with a number of bunkbeds. Each bunkbed sleeps two people.
  2. Robin Hood Inn

    Cragg Vale

    Robin Hood Inn

    The old Robin Hood Inn has been in business since around 1800. We are a convivial Yorkshire village pub with welcoming open fires, hand-pumped ...
    The old Robin Hood Inn has been in business since around 1800. We are a convivial Yorkshire village pub with welcoming open fires, hand-pumped real ales, quality wines, speciality lagers and home made pub food, located on beautiful Cragg Vale, close to The Calderdale Way walking route.
  3. The Shepherd's Rest Inn

    Todmorden

    The Shepherd's Rest Inn

    A traditional country pub set high on the South Pennine Moors overlooking Todmorden, with plenty of fantastic home-cooked food in a friendly relaxe...
    A traditional country pub set high on the South Pennine Moors overlooking Todmorden, with plenty of fantastic home-cooked food in a friendly relaxed atmosphere and a great selection of cask ales, lagers, ciders or wines. Families are welcomed into the Gallery restaurant, with the children’s play area just outside the door. Anyone with dogs, or who just wants a few pints after work are wlecomed into the cosy bar area with roaring fires in winter, there is adequate space in here to eat too. And the child free Langfields is perfect for an evening with friends or an intimate dinner. The Stoodley Pike Monument, which can be seen on the hill opposite, was built to commemorate the Battle of Waterloo but fell down in 1854. The present Pike dates from 1856. If you go exploring take a torch to help climb the dark staircase on to the balcony. We are located approximately 400 metres off the route of The Calderdale Way along Lumbutts Road, so are ideally placed for you to stop, refresh and recharge with some great home-cooked food.
  4. Stoodley Pike Monument

    Todmorden

    Stoodley Pike Monument

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The...

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The monument was designed in 1854 by local architect James Green, and completed in 1856 at the end of the Crimean War.

    The monument replaced an earlier structure, commemorating the defeat of Napoleon and the surrender of Paris. It was completed in 1815, after the Battle of Waterloo, but collapsed in 1854 after decades of weathering and a lightning strike.

    You can only reach the Pike on foot, as there is no vehicular or bicycle access to the monument. Stoodley Pike is accessible by well-defined Right of Way footpaths. The Pennine Way also passes Stoodley Pike. There are many walking routes to the Pike from Todmorden, Hebden Bridge and Mytholmroyd. Walking guides to all these routes available from local Visitor Centres and the Heart of the Pennines online shop.

    Stoodley Pike Monument contains a spiral staircase of 39 steps, accessed from its north side. If you visit, please be aware that several of the internal steps are in darkness, so it’s useful to have a torch to light your way, as there are no windows. The entrance to the balcony is on the Monument’s west face, some 40 feet above ground level. The views are well worth the walk and the climb!

  5. The Yorkshire Gallery

    Halifax

    The Yorkshire Gallery

    The Yorkshire Gallery is a warm and inviting independent contemporary gallery. It's a family run business that is really passionate about Yorksh...
    The Yorkshire Gallery is a warm and inviting independent contemporary gallery. It's a family run business that is really passionate about Yorkshire and proud to showcase work by artists/designers & makers that have connections with our wonderful county. Supporting and nurturing established artists and those just graduating, The Yorkshire Gallery showcase their work in a carefully curated space with a regular programme of exhibitions that reflects their passion for fine art, contemporary jewellery and engaging craft.
  6. Wainhouse Tavern

    Halifax

    Wainhouse Tavern

    Your friendly local in the heart of Pye Nest!

    The Wainhouse Tavern was built in 1877 as a home for industrialist John Wainhouse, who cre...

    Your friendly local in the heart of Pye Nest!

    The Wainhouse Tavern was built in 1877 as a home for industrialist John Wainhouse, who created the nearby Wainhouse Tower.

    All our food is homemade from scratch, our vegetables and meat are from local vendors to ensure we have the freshest ingredients. We have vegetarian options and gluten free options available daily.

    Serving a wide range of cask ales, many from local breweries. Lagers include Kaltenberg, San Miguel and more on draught, Budweiser, Peroni and more in bottles. Ciders include Strongbow, Kingstone Press on draught, Magners and Rekorderlig in bottles. Alternatively why not try our selection of competitively priced house and premium wines.... or tackle our range of malt whiskies, gins and rums.

  7. Halifax Playhouse

    Halifax

    Halifax Playhouse

    Halifax Playhouse, the home of Halifax Thespians, and one of West Yorkshire's leading venues for live theatre. It's often said that you never kn...
    Halifax Playhouse, the home of Halifax Thespians, and one of West Yorkshire's leading venues for live theatre. It's often said that you never know what to expect when you step through the doors of Halifax Playhouse. As the home of Halifax Thespians, the Playhouse can surprise, delight, amuse and entertain, and that's before the interval. The enthusiasm of the actors, singers, dancers and musicians who perform at the Playhouse really does shine through, giving you a first class night out (or a matinee) every time. Relax in the cosy and welcoming surroundings of the Playhouse Bar. It is open from 7pm (6.45pm on Saturdays) to 11pm when there is a show on. You can order your interval drinks before the show to avoid queuing later. The Playhouse coffee lounge opens in the interval of most shows, serving fairtrade coffee or tea. At other times coffee is available from the bar.
  8. Gibson Mill, Hardcastle Crags

    Hebden Bridge

    Hardcastle Crags & Gibson Mill

    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the...
    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the country. Gibson Mill is situated within Hardcastle Crags woodland beside Hebden Water. The National Trust have put in some superb waymarked walking routes suitable for all abilities. Cross the river on stepping stones and spot birds, insects, amphibians and if you're lucky; deer! You'll find Hardcastle Crags offers a completely different experience throughout the year - from the icicles of midwinter to the carpet of bluebells in the spring. The early 19th century Gibson Mill is situated within the site. A tour of the mill tells the history of the valley and the mill over the past 200 years. The mill also has changing exhibitions throughout the year. Gibson Mill is 100% self-sufficient in energy, water and waste treatment. It has a hydro-electric system, solar photovoltaic panels and a log-burning stove fuelled by wood from the estate. You can also rest and recharge at the Weaving Shed Café, serving delicious ethical and locally-produced food and buy the perfect gift or memento in the shop located there. Built in around 1800,Gibson Mill was one of the first mills of the Industrial Revolution. The mill was driven by a water wheel and produced cotton cloth up until 1890. In the early 1900s, Gibson Mill began to be used as an ‘entertainment emporium’ for the local people. After the Second World War, the mill slipped into disuse, and was acquired by the National Trust in 1950. Hardcastle Crags is open all year round from dawn until dusk, admission to Hardcastle Crags and Gibson Mill are FREE. Dogs are welcome (including in the café and mill) if kept under close control. GETTING THERE You have three options to get to Hardcastle Crags: By car - there is parking at Midgehole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AA) and Clough Hole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AZ). A parking fee applies at both car parks, although parking is free for National Trust members By bus – the 906 runs from Hebden Bridge on weekends between May and October. It will take you to both the bottom and the top of the valley. Walking – there is a route from Hebden Bridge on good paths with a bit of road walking. It will take you about 45 minutes. Pick up a guide from Hebden Bridge Visitor Centre. See below for details of the wildlife you can discover at Hardcastle Crags.
  9. The Millers Bar

    Brighouse

    The Millers Bar

    Great people make great places and great times. The Millers Bar in Brighouse had been voted into the top 30 of the county’s pubs by the general ...
    Great people make great places and great times. The Millers Bar in Brighouse had been voted into the top 30 of the county’s pubs by the general public in the Welcome to Yorkshire competition for the last two years and made it a hat-trick in 2017, being voted as one of the Yorkshire public’s favourite pubs for the third year running. The Millers Bar is a family friendly community Pub where you can enjoy relaxation, celebration, social and networking events and general revelry. The pub is designed to feel like home, cosy, informal and dog friendly with eclectic shabby chic furniture and real fires to get comfy around. Our helpful and polite bar staff are trained to serve and advise you. Food is served daily in the bar and restaurant from 12 Noon to 8.30pm. Our food comes from local suppliers and represent the best of Yorkshire ingredients topped off with the flair of our experienced chef.
  10. eptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Heptonstall

    Heptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One...
    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One of the first octagonal chapels, it is one of the oldest Methodist churches in continuous use today. This unusual octagonal chapel is open every day. It’s tucked away at the bottom of a flight of steps off Northgate. Entry is free, with donations to the upkeep of the Chapel welcome. Please email Circuit Heritage Officer Mr. John Wilson regarding visits and other activities, at chme@calderdalemethodists.org.uk. Methodism in Heptonstall began with the firebrand Scot William Darney. He founded many societies on both sides of the Pennines as he travelled, preaching as he went. The Heptonstall “Darney Society” was visited by Charles and John Wesley in 1747. In these early days, Heptonstall had a preacher every sixth Sunday, with the travelling preachers receiving no stipend or allowance, eating where they could. John Wesley continued to visit Heptonstall and there were always immense crowds to hear him. The society was so successful it was decided to build a chapel. The octagon shape was then fashionable for Methodist preaching houses, as it avoided conflict with the established church. The building was finished in 1764. It was intended to hold 200 people, but by 1802 there were 337 members and over 1000 scholars. The solution was to knock down the far end of the chapel, lengthen the walls and rebuild it, preserving its octagonal shape. Heptonstall is located on The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route that circles the borough of Calderdale. Please call in to visit the Chapel if you're passing by.
  11. Dies used By the Cragg Vale Coiners

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Coiners

    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's a...
    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's activities were said to be so damaging that they threatened to wreck Britain's currency. David Hartley learnt his trade as an ironworker in Birmingham, before getting into trouble and moving back to Mytholmroyd to escape the authorities. Once returned to his home at Bell House farmhouse (which is now a bed & breakfast accommodation with educational facilities) David used ironworking as a cover to clip or file the edges from gold coins, milling the edges back so the change was all but unnoticeable, and making counterfeit coins from the shavings whilst returning the clipped coins into circulation. David’s activities soon spread to other farms, with families at nearby Hill Top Farm and Keelham Farm soon becoming involved; forming the beginnings of the gang of Cragg Vale Coiners. Local publicans also helped by placing the counterfeit coins into circulation. David Hartley seems to have been an enigmatic leader, becoming known as 'King David' Hartley and the gang’s numbers grew considerably until well over 30 individuals were involved. Rumours of the gang's activities reached the authorities, who sent an excise man named William Deighton to investigate. One of the coiners turned King’s Evidence and betrayed the gang, leading to Hartley's arrest at an Inn in Halifax on 14th October 1769. Hartley's brother Isaac offered £100 to anybody who would kill Deighton. It is alleged that the plotters planned Deighton's murder at an Inn in Mytholmroyd called Barbary's, which is now gone, but was located on the opposite side of the road to the present day Dusty Miller. On November 10th 1769 at Bull Close Lane near Halifax, Deighton was approached by two men, Matthew Normanton and Robert Thomas. Deighton was shot dead, his body also showing signs of having been stamped on. Just days later, the Government offered a reward of £100 for information leading to the arrest of the murderers and a pardon for anybody, bar the killers, who would turn King's Evidence. Over 30 people were subsequently arrested, including 'King David' Hartley, who was sentenced to death on April 6th 1770 and hanged at Tynburn, near York, on April 28th. His body is buried in the graveyard of the village of Heptonstall, above Hebden Bridge. Robert Thomas was acquitted of Deighton's murder, but was later hanged in 1774 for being a highwayman. Matthew Normanton initially fled the authorities, but was later caught and hanged in 1775. Isaac Hartley was never brought to trial due to a lack of evidence and died in 1815, aged 78. Heptonstall Museum has on display some of the original dies used by the Coiners to stamp their gold discs into coins, as well as panels telling more of their story.
  12. Onlineauthentic

    Halifax

    Onlineauthentic

    OnlineAuthentic specialise in memorabilia sales, event management, celebrity signings, guest speaker management, auctions, fundraising and charity ...
    OnlineAuthentic specialise in memorabilia sales, event management, celebrity signings, guest speaker management, auctions, fundraising and charity events. They guarantee authenticity of all memorabilia, proven by a unique certificate of authenticity with every item.
  13. The Sunken Garden at Manor Heath Park

    Halifax

    Manor Heath Park

    Open all year round, Manor Heath Park is a nineteen acre Green Flag Award and Yorkshire in Bloom Gold Award winning park, featuring

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    Open all year round, Manor Heath Park is a nineteen acre Green Flag Award and Yorkshire in Bloom Gold Award winning park, featuring

    • a woodland walk and wild flower area, planted with over thirty species of wild flowers and bulbs
    • a well-equipped children's play area for all abilities
    • a water park and sand pit (from April to October)
    • outdoor gym
    • plenty of spots for the perfect picnic
    • The Jungle Experience
    • The Walled Garden
    • The Flutterbites Cafe

    Entrance to the park is FREE. Entrance to the Jungle Experience is £1 per person, for everyone 3 years old and over.

    All year round opening times for The Jungle Experience and Walled Garden are:

    Opening time:10 am every day.

    Closing times: last entry 3.30pm, closed 3.45pm every day except Friday.. Friday closing: last entry 3pm and closed 3.15pm.

    Educational visits to Manor Heath for schools covering the national curriculum can be arranged by Phoning 01422 365631 or emailing parks@calderdale.gov.uk. Booking is essential.


  14. R1DE Spin Studio

    Brighouse

    R1DE Spin Studio

    R1DE is a high intensity indoor cycling studio, based on the first floor in ROKT where people come together to get fit, feel the beat and enjoy the...
    R1DE is a high intensity indoor cycling studio, based on the first floor in ROKT where people come together to get fit, feel the beat and enjoy the ride. High energy, but low impact, R1DE offers a fun, effective workout on a bike. Whatever level or ability, there is a R1DE to suit beginners through to serious road riders. Opening hours: Seven days a week, please refer customers to the timetable online Email: info@r1de.co.uk
  15. Far Barsey Farm Shop

    Barkisland

    Far Barsey Farm Shop

    Local Family Run Farm Shop producing and selling Top Quality Home Reared Beef. Succulent Lamb, Pork, Chicken & Game. Award Winning Sausages and an ...
    Local Family Run Farm Shop producing and selling Top Quality Home Reared Beef. Succulent Lamb, Pork, Chicken & Game. Award Winning Sausages and an Extensive BBQ Range. Fresh Fruit and Vegetables, Homemade Cakes, Pies and Pastries, Delicatessen & a wide range of cheeses, Ready Meals, Wines & Beers, Jams & Preserves, Ice Cream & Giftware. Everything from a simple tea to the Ultimate Dinner Party.
  16. Jerusalem Farm Camp Site

    Luddenden

    Jerusalem Farm Camp Site

    Please note that Jerusalem Farm campsite is now closed for the Winter and will reopen on Friday 10th April 2020.
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    Please note that Jerusalem Farm campsite is now closed for the Winter and will reopen on Friday 10th April 2020.

    Jerusalem Farm is a simple, informal campsite suitable for backpackers and families, located in a beautiful, quiet, secluded area adjoining a local nature reserve, stream, woodland and moors.

    We are a quiet family site offering 30 pitches. Camping is on a flat grassy area adjacent to the Luddenden Brook and Wade Wood.

    We are situated on The Calderdale Way and are only 6 miles from The Pennine Way.

    We have an Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Point: 1 x  7kW 32A  Type 2 Mennekes, ZeroNet.

    Midge repellant is essential during the summer months.

    Charges:

    £8 per night for adults

    £5 per night for children under 15 (Under 5's free)

    £1 per dog (maximum 2 per party)

    £3 gazebo per night (maximum 1 per party) (£1 discount for Passport to Leisure holders)

    Visit The Jerusalem Farm Facebook page

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