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  1. The Robin Hood Inn, Peckett Well

    Hebden Bridge

    The Robin Hood Inn, Peckett Well

    Experience a warm and friendly atmosphere at the Robin Hood Inn. Set in stunning countryside, in the small hill top village of Pecket Well, Hebden ...
    Experience a warm and friendly atmosphere at the Robin Hood Inn. Set in stunning countryside, in the small hill top village of Pecket Well, Hebden Bridge. Enjoy a meal or bar snack in the relaxing bar area; if the weather is fine and warm our lovely fenced beer garden which is ideal for small children and well behaved dogs on a lead or by our log-burning stoves for those cosy winter evenings Our menu has a wide choice of food to choose from, including daily specials and a large range of desserts. Children and well-behaved dogs on a lead are welcome.
  2. Stoodley Pike Monument

    Todmorden

    Stoodley Pike Monument

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The...

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The monument was designed in 1854 by local architect James Green, and completed in 1856 at the end of the Crimean War.

    The monument replaced an earlier structure, commemorating the defeat of Napoleon and the surrender of Paris. It was completed in 1815, after the Battle of Waterloo, but collapsed in 1854 after decades of weathering and a lightning strike.

    You can only reach the Pike on foot, as there is no vehicular or bicycle access to the monument. Stoodley Pike is accessible by well-defined Right of Way footpaths. The Pennine Way also passes Stoodley Pike. There are many walking routes to the Pike from Todmorden, Hebden Bridge and Mytholmroyd. Walking guides to all these routes available from local Visitor Centres and the Heart of the Pennines online shop.

    Stoodley Pike Monument contains a spiral staircase of 39 steps, accessed from its north side. If you visit, please be aware that several of the internal steps are in darkness, so it’s useful to have a torch to light your way, as there are no windows. The entrance to the balcony is on the Monument’s west face, some 40 feet above ground level. The views are well worth the walk and the climb!

  3. Jitterbug Jean, Piece Hall, Halifax, Calderdale

    Halifax

    Jitterbug Jean

    Jitterbug Jean shows off the quirky styles of vintage Rockabilly. Offering a range of clothing from classic swing dresses, floral prints and th...
    Jitterbug Jean shows off the quirky styles of vintage Rockabilly. Offering a range of clothing from classic swing dresses, floral prints and the eye popping Irregular Choice shoes that will complete your outfit. Brands inlcude Lindy Bop, Lady Vintage London, Banned, Hell Bunny and Irregular Choice shoes. Opening Hours: Monday - Saturday 10am-6pm Sunday 11am-5pm
  4. Al's-Emporium

    Halifax

    Al's Emporium

    West Yorkshire family-run business, Al’s Emporium, sells antique, retro & vintage style furniture and collectables. They also support local artists...
    West Yorkshire family-run business, Al’s Emporium, sells antique, retro & vintage style furniture and collectables. They also support local artists and “wannabe Lord Sugars” by renting out glass display cabinets, showcasing handmade crafts, collectables, antiques, militaria, art and the weird & wonderful. There is always an eclectic mix of different items at Al’s Emporium to suit all pockets and tastes. Al’s Emporium has moved to The Piece Hall from a high street shop in the market town of Todmorden to concentrate on promoting their smaller items of vintage & antique furniture and collectables. Al’s Emporium gained its name from a long standing family joke, at the expense of its owner, Alan Sargent, part of the husband and wife team who own the family business. It was the nickname given to Alan’s storage unit which family and friends referred to as “Al’s Emporium” because of the amount of items stored in it. Alan and Simone are working towards Al’s Emporium becoming a “must-go-to” shop at The Piece Hall where customers will always receive a first class service and a warm Yorkshire welcome.
  5. The Walled Garden at Manor Heath Park

    Halifax

    The Walled Garden at Manor Heath Park

    Open all year round, Manor Heath Park's Walled garden is part of this nineteen acre Green Flag Award and Yorkshire in Bloom Gold Award winning p...

    Open all year round, Manor Heath Park's Walled garden is part of this nineteen acre Green Flag Award and Yorkshire in Bloom Gold Award winning park.

    The Walled Garden was once used to grow flowers, fruit and vegetables for the former Manor Heath Mansion (you can read about the history of Manor Heath Park and the Mansion here) and is today used to demonstrate different types of gardening techniques of topical interest and bedding plant trials for Calderdale's parks.

    There are several sections in the walled garden:

    The Container Garden demonstrates the different ways of displaying plants in pots and hanging baskets.

    The Alpine Mint Walk. Enjoy the fragrance of the Corsican Mint planted between the paving stones. Bees and insects love the small blue flowers during the summer.

    The Rock Garden is made from local sandstone and planted with specialist alpines and bulbs.

    Herbaceous Borders using traditional plants for a magnificent summer flowering display.

    Prairie Planting. A bed specially designed and planted with grasses and some herbaceous perennials for very low maintenance i.e. no staking and only trimming back in spring. The coloured grasses and seed heads last right through the autumn and into winter.

    The Necklace Garden boasts tradtional plants and old-fashioned roses growing in a formal setting.

    The Winter Garden features plants of winter interest including flowers, stems, foliage and berries; to illustrate how gardens can still be attractive in winter.

    The Mediterranean Garden shows how plants normally found in the Med can be grown in Calderdale, with plenty of ideas for plants to grow in domestic gardens for the water conscious gardener. The gravel garden shows plants that will survive in hot, dry  places.

    Exhibition English Garden This professional design gives colour and texture throughout the growing season with many unusual plants and bulbs.

    Demonstration Beds. Watch out in summer for trials of new varieties of bedding plants and bedding schemes. If successful, some will be put into practice in flower beds across Calderdale. The Dahlias and Chrysanthemums are grown in the summer by volunteer growers who grow to show standards. We are very fortunate to have them helping us out and we thank them for the time they spend here.

    Rose Walk and Plummery. Enjoy the shade of the willow tunnel and rose walk; see the craftsmanship in the curved dry stone walls built from recycled stone. The Victoria Plum Trees were donated by members of the public. 

    Educational and school visits covering all stages of the national curriculaum can be arranged. Prior booking is essential, please phone Manor Heath on 01422 365631 or email parks@calderdale.gov.uk for more details. 

    When visiting the Walled Garden, you can also visit  The Jungle Experience and refresh with a cuppa and cake at The Flutterbites Cafe.

    Entrance to the Walled Garden and Mnaor Heath Park is FREE. 

    All year round opening times for the Walled Garden are:

    Opening time:10 am every day.

    Closing times: last entry 3.30pm, closed 3.45pm every day except Friday.

    Friday closing: last entry 3pm and closed 3.15pm.

    Educational visits to Manor Heath for schools covering the national curriculum can be arranged by Phoning 01422 365631 or emailing parks@calderdale.gov.uk. Booking is essential.

  6. Gibson Mill, Hardcastle Crags

    Hebden Bridge

    Hardcastle Crags & Gibson Mill

    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the...
    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the country. Gibson Mill is situated within Hardcastle Crags woodland beside Hebden Water. The National Trust have put in some superb waymarked walking routes suitable for all abilities. Cross the river on stepping stones and spot birds, insects, amphibians and if you're lucky; deer! You'll find Hardcastle Crags offers a completely different experience throughout the year - from the icicles of midwinter to the carpet of bluebells in the spring. The early 19th century Gibson Mill is situated within the site. A tour of the mill tells the history of the valley and the mill over the past 200 years. The mill also has changing exhibitions throughout the year. Gibson Mill is 100% self-sufficient in energy, water and waste treatment. It has a hydro-electric system, solar photovoltaic panels and a log-burning stove fuelled by wood from the estate. You can also rest and recharge at the Weaving Shed Café, serving delicious ethical and locally-produced food and buy the perfect gift or memento in the shop located there. Built in around 1800,Gibson Mill was one of the first mills of the Industrial Revolution. The mill was driven by a water wheel and produced cotton cloth up until 1890. In the early 1900s, Gibson Mill began to be used as an ‘entertainment emporium’ for the local people. After the Second World War, the mill slipped into disuse, and was acquired by the National Trust in 1950. Hardcastle Crags is open all year round from dawn until dusk, admission to Hardcastle Crags and Gibson Mill are FREE. Dogs are welcome (including in the café and mill) if kept under close control. GETTING THERE You have three options to get to Hardcastle Crags: By car - there is parking at Midgehole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AA) and Clough Hole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AZ). A parking fee applies at both car parks, although parking is free for National Trust members By bus – the 906 runs from Hebden Bridge on weekends between May and October. It will take you to both the bottom and the top of the valley. Walking – there is a route from Hebden Bridge on good paths with a bit of road walking. It will take you about 45 minutes. Pick up a guide from Hebden Bridge Visitor Centre. See below for details of the wildlife you can discover at Hardcastle Crags.
  7. Hebden Bridge Equestrian Centre

    Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge Equestrian Centre

    Hebden Bridge Equestrian Centre is situated on the scenic moors of Wadsworth above Hebden Bridge in West Yorkshire. The 50-mile Calderdale Way walk...
    Hebden Bridge Equestrian Centre is situated on the scenic moors of Wadsworth above Hebden Bridge in West Yorkshire. The 50-mile Calderdale Way walking route passes right by our centre. Our Riding School offers horse riding hacks in which you can take in fantastic views - in just 15 minutes you can feel like you are on the top of the world! Visit us for the best in Yorkshire riding.
  8. Jeremy's at the Boathouse

    Brighouse

    Jeremy's at the Boathouse

    We are an exciting and unique bar and kitchen in the heart of Brighouse situated on the lovely canal basin opposite Sainsburys. We incorporate the ...
    We are an exciting and unique bar and kitchen in the heart of Brighouse situated on the lovely canal basin opposite Sainsburys. We incorporate the history of the old boathouse at Victoria works with innovation and passion to create this modern yet historical bar still full of original features. We aim to satisfy everyone’s needs, whether you fancy a mid-shop coffee, relaxing wine, sophisticated cocktail or a pint of real ale we are the place to be. To add to our unique offering we have made all of our wines available by the glass. We serve a range of food in an informal and relaxed environment. Anything from a lunchtime sandwich to a full three course meal is available all home cooked and using fresh ingredients locally sourced. For something a little different why not try our tapas and look out for our special deals. At the weekend Jeremy’s becomes a great live music venue showcasing the best local bands and beyond. We have live music every Friday and Saturday from 9pm and chilled out acoustic sounds every Sunday from 4pm.
  9. eptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Heptonstall

    Heptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One...
    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One of the first octagonal chapels, it is one of the oldest Methodist churches in continuous use today. This unusual octagonal chapel is open every day. It’s tucked away at the bottom of a flight of steps off Northgate. Entry is free, with donations to the upkeep of the Chapel welcome. Please email Circuit Heritage Officer Mr. John Wilson regarding visits and other activities, at chme@calderdalemethodists.org.uk. Methodism in Heptonstall began with the firebrand Scot William Darney. He founded many societies on both sides of the Pennines as he travelled, preaching as he went. The Heptonstall “Darney Society” was visited by Charles and John Wesley in 1747. In these early days, Heptonstall had a preacher every sixth Sunday, with the travelling preachers receiving no stipend or allowance, eating where they could. John Wesley continued to visit Heptonstall and there were always immense crowds to hear him. The society was so successful it was decided to build a chapel. The octagon shape was then fashionable for Methodist preaching houses, as it avoided conflict with the established church. The building was finished in 1764. It was intended to hold 200 people, but by 1802 there were 337 members and over 1000 scholars. The solution was to knock down the far end of the chapel, lengthen the walls and rebuild it, preserving its octagonal shape. Heptonstall is located on The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route that circles the borough of Calderdale. Please call in to visit the Chapel if you're passing by.
  10. Dies used By the Cragg Vale Coiners

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Coiners

    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's a...
    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's activities were said to be so damaging that they threatened to wreck Britain's currency. David Hartley learnt his trade as an ironworker in Birmingham, before getting into trouble and moving back to Mytholmroyd to escape the authorities. Once returned to his home at Bell House farmhouse (which is now a bed & breakfast accommodation with educational facilities) David used ironworking as a cover to clip or file the edges from gold coins, milling the edges back so the change was all but unnoticeable, and making counterfeit coins from the shavings whilst returning the clipped coins into circulation. David’s activities soon spread to other farms, with families at nearby Hill Top Farm and Keelham Farm soon becoming involved; forming the beginnings of the gang of Cragg Vale Coiners. Local publicans also helped by placing the counterfeit coins into circulation. David Hartley seems to have been an enigmatic leader, becoming known as 'King David' Hartley and the gang’s numbers grew considerably until well over 30 individuals were involved. Rumours of the gang's activities reached the authorities, who sent an excise man named William Deighton to investigate. One of the coiners turned King’s Evidence and betrayed the gang, leading to Hartley's arrest at an Inn in Halifax on 14th October 1769. Hartley's brother Isaac offered £100 to anybody who would kill Deighton. It is alleged that the plotters planned Deighton's murder at an Inn in Mytholmroyd called Barbary's, which is now gone, but was located on the opposite side of the road to the present day Dusty Miller. On November 10th 1769 at Bull Close Lane near Halifax, Deighton was approached by two men, Matthew Normanton and Robert Thomas. Deighton was shot dead, his body also showing signs of having been stamped on. Just days later, the Government offered a reward of £100 for information leading to the arrest of the murderers and a pardon for anybody, bar the killers, who would turn King's Evidence. Over 30 people were subsequently arrested, including 'King David' Hartley, who was sentenced to death on April 6th 1770 and hanged at Tynburn, near York, on April 28th. His body is buried in the graveyard of the village of Heptonstall, above Hebden Bridge. Robert Thomas was acquitted of Deighton's murder, but was later hanged in 1774 for being a highwayman. Matthew Normanton initially fled the authorities, but was later caught and hanged in 1775. Isaac Hartley was never brought to trial due to a lack of evidence and died in 1815, aged 78. Heptonstall Museum has on display some of the original dies used by the Coiners to stamp their gold discs into coins, as well as panels telling more of their story.
  11. Jewella

    Halifax

    Jewella

    Jewella is an emporium of beautiful jewellery and accessories from leading brands in the UK. Think fashionable statement necklaces and stunning pie...
    Jewella is an emporium of beautiful jewellery and accessories from leading brands in the UK. Think fashionable statement necklaces and stunning pieces encrusted with semi-precious stones and Swarovski crystals. Add glamour to your wardrobe with contemporary and vintage inspired pieces.
  12. Calder Homes Park, Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge

    Calder Holmes Park

    Calder Holmes Park is a green open space, close to Hebden Bridge town centre. The park has an outdoor gym, a skateboard park childrens’ pl...

    Calder Holmes Park is a green open space, close to Hebden Bridge town centre. The park has an outdoor gym, a skateboard park childrens’ playground and is home to Park Life Cafe.

    There are some short flat tarmac paths to walk on and you can combine this with walking on the adjacent canal towpath and watch the narrowboats slip by.

    The park hosts a variety of events throughout the year such as the Hebden Bridge Handmade Parade.

  13. Jerusalem Farm Camp Site

    Luddenden

    Jerusalem Farm Camp Site

    Please note that Jerusalem Farm campsite is now closed for the Winter and will reopen on Friday 10th April 2020.
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    Please note that Jerusalem Farm campsite is now closed for the Winter and will reopen on Friday 10th April 2020.

    Jerusalem Farm is a simple, informal campsite suitable for backpackers and families, located in a beautiful, quiet, secluded area adjoining a local nature reserve, stream, woodland and moors.

    We are a quiet family site offering 30 pitches. Camping is on a flat grassy area adjacent to the Luddenden Brook and Wade Wood.

    We are situated on The Calderdale Way and are only 6 miles from The Pennine Way.

    We have an Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Point: 1 x  7kW 32A  Type 2 Mennekes, ZeroNet.

    Midge repellant is essential during the summer months.

    Charges:

    £8 per night for adults

    £5 per night for children under 15 (Under 5's free)

    £1 per dog (maximum 2 per party)

    £3 gazebo per night (maximum 1 per party) (£1 discount for Passport to Leisure holders)

    Visit The Jerusalem Farm Facebook page

  14. The Hare & Hounds Inn

    Hebden Bridge

    The Hare & Hounds Inn

    Known locally as the Lane Ends, the inn has been serving fine ales for over 150 years. We offer stunning views, open fires, Timothy Taylor Ales and...
    Known locally as the Lane Ends, the inn has been serving fine ales for over 150 years. We offer stunning views, open fires, Timothy Taylor Ales and great value home made meals. We serve home cooked food everyday of the week; our aim is to serve good pub grub at a price that you like. This is just a sample of our dishes that we have to offer, our menu changes regularly, and we always cater for vegetarians and vegans. The Inn sits 900 feet above sea level on the edge of The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route which circles the borough, offering panoramic views.
  15. The Moorcock Inn

    Sowerby Bridge

    The Moorcock Inn

    The Moorcock Inn is at the foot of 250 acres of productive moorland, providing plenty of plants, berries, mushrooms and game. Our 2-acre plot is be...
    The Moorcock Inn is at the foot of 250 acres of productive moorland, providing plenty of plants, berries, mushrooms and game. Our 2-acre plot is being developed to provide an organic kitchen garden, providing the foundations of our pub & restaurant menus- with the best of Yorkshire produce supplying the rest. Both the pub and restaurant menus are written with the seasons and cooked over fire. ​Our wine list focuses on natural wines from small producers. We offer a continually changing selection by the glass and carafe- featuring both classic and more quirky styles. Alongside our draught beers, we also have a local and world bottled selection, particularly featuring traditional Belgian styles- some of which are rare, vintage and aged. The Pub Is a cosy, traditional freehouse, with oak beams and wood-burning stoves. It offers a menu of seasonal plates cooked over charcoal, along with house-made charcuterie and aged cheeses- accompanied by great drinks. It's the perfect place to stop by for a quick pint and a snack, or to settle in by the fire for dinner and wine. In addition to our wine and beer selections, there is a spirits list based on Yorkshire distilleries, and a seasonal cocktail list. Our pub menu can also be enjoyed outdoors, with blankets and warming fires, and a view of the sunset over the Ryburn Valley. The Calderdale Way walking route passes by us, just over 200 metres away, The restaurant offers a daily set menu consisting of multiple courses, served in a relaxed, farmhouse-like atmosphere. Some courses are served as individual plates, at other times, several dishes are served together. While the pub menu focuses on tasty snacks and small plates that are great to have alongside drinks, the restaurant menu highlights traditional homesteading techniques, cooking over fire, preservation techniques and the sourcing of local, seasonal and wild ingredients. It's the place where we strictly use the produce around us and the ingredients we are most proud of.
  16. The Piece Hall Photo by Paul White Photography

    Halifax

    The Piece Hall

    The Piece Hall is unique. A Grade I listed Georgian masterpiece and the oldest remaining cloth hall in Britain.

    Following a multi-millio...

    The Piece Hall is unique. A Grade I listed Georgian masterpiece and the oldest remaining cloth hall in Britain.

    Following a multi-million pound transformation project, Britain's magnificent and last surviving cloth hall is ready to welcome visitors again.

    The Grade I listed structure has stood at the heart of Halifax since 1779 and has now re-opened as a world class cultural, heritage and leisure destination.

    The huge open-air courtyard is surrounded by a mix of independent bars, restaurants, cafes, galleries and shops. The stories of Georgian Halifax are told in the specially created exhibition spaces, while the central courtyard plays host to a year-round events programme of music, dance, film and spectacle for up to 7,500 people at a time.

    Click here to watch a short video about the reopening of The Piece Hall

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