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  1. Ted Hughes

    Mytholmroyd

    Ted Hughes

    Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was born at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, on the 17th August 1930. He lived there unti...

    Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was born at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, on the 17th August 1930. He lived there until he was seven, when his family moved to Mexborough. During his childhood he spent many hours exploring the countryside around Mytholmroyd, and these experiences and the influences of the landscape on him were to inform much of his later poetry.

    One of the greatest poets of his generation, Hughes also wrote stories, plays, reviews and essays. He translated the work of, amongst others, Ovid, Racine, Aeschylus and Euripides. He wrote extensively for children, including the story The Iron Man, which was turned into the Disney blockbuster The Iron Giant. Hughes's interests in other art forms led to many collaborations, most famously with the artist Leonard Baskin.

    Although best known in the UK, Hughes was a writer of international standing. He won numerous awards throughout his career, including four for his final collection, Birthday Letters. Hughes became Poet Laureate in 1984 until his death on 28th October 1998.

  2. Group Travel in Calderdale: Coach Parking & Drop Off Points

    Across Calderdale

    Group Travel in Calderdale: Coach Parking & Drop Off Points

    Whatever your group’s size and whenever you choose to visit, once you’ve discovered what Calderdale has to offer you’ll find r...

    Whatever your group’s size and whenever you choose to visit, once you’ve discovered what Calderdale has to offer you’ll find reasons to visit again and again.

    A Warm Welcome

    Encounter miles of stunning countryside, bustling market towns where independent shops outnumber the national chains, magnificent gardens and parkland, fantastic locally sourced food and drink, two past winners of Yorkshire’s Favourite Pub, some of the finest examples of architecture anywhere in the country, festivals, theatres, agricultural shows, music, exhibitions, antiques, galleries and a rich mix of annual events.

    Calderdale is the southernmost of the Yorkshire Dales and covers part of the South Pennines area of beautiful river valleys, moorland and hill country. Calderdale is not as well-known as its Northern neighbours as it does not fall within the boundaries of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. Yet Calderdale has a tremendous amount to offer visitors, time after time.

    Ideally located off major routes, getting here couldn't be easier - your group will be able to arrive relaxed and raring to go. Visit our Getting to Calderdale page and discover how simple it can be to come and pay us a visit.

    Once you're here, you'll quickly realise there's a lot more to Calderdale than you can discover in a single day. There are plenty of hotels suitable for groups that will serve as an ideal base for you to explore our magnificently modest area.

    Calderdale also has three friendly visitor information centres that are just a phone call away and who can help to provide you with additional information and inside tips to make your trip a real success, whatever your tastes and budget.

    Calderdale offers great value for money and a warm Yorkshire welcome. We look forward to seeing you soon!

    Coach Parking & Drop Off Points

    Here's some handy information on set down points and parking for coaches:

    Halifax

    Set Down Points:

    Cobbled lay by (adjacent to 'The Woolshops Shopping Centre' car park, on your left) on Square Road, Halifax, HX1 1QG. 

    Coach Parking:

    • Pre-booked coach parking is available in the Eureka! car parks. All coach parking must be booked in advance directly with Eureka! and is subject to availability.. Eureka! Contact: 01422 330069
    • Pre-booked coach parking for a maximum of two coaches is available at The  Shay Stadium, Halifax HX3 0AQ in the South Stand Car Park. All coach parking must be booked in advance.  £25.00 for a full day – weekdays only, (cash only).  No reduction for part days. The Shay Stadium 01422 264750

    Hebden Bridge

    Set Down Points: Lay by on New Road, HX7 8AF (adjacent to Hebden Bridge Marina).

    Coach Parking: There is a signposted car park in the nearby village of Heptonstall on Valley View Road. (Use the Heptonstall turning circle just outside Hebden Bridge to double back up towards Heptonstall.) The lay-by opposite the Heptonstall turning circle also sometimes has space to park, but the amount of space available there varies daily.

    Parking is available for up to two coaches in a lay-by at the marina on New Road by Hebden Bridge Visitor Centre for up to three hours. Postcode HX7 8AF

    There is a signposted car park in nearby Heptonstall, on Valley View Road. Postcode HX7 7LB.

    There is also a lay-by opposite the Heptonstall turning circle on King Street (A646). There is sometimes space to park here, although the amount of space available varies daily. Postcode HX7 6LX.

    Todmorden

    Set Down Point: Stand A, Todmorden Bus Station, Burnley Road, OL14 5DJ. Please use Stand A, which is located on the main road, for both drop off and pick up.

    Coach Parking: Todmorden Bus Station, Burnley Road, OL14 5DJ. After dropping off at Stand A, coaches can drive onto the bus station proper and park in one of two lay-bys at the station designated as 'bus lay over'. For more information please ring Metro on 0113 2517330.

  3. Dies used By the Cragg Vale Coiners

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Coiners

    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's a...
    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's activities were said to be so damaging that they threatened to wreck Britain's currency. David Hartley learnt his trade as an ironworker in Birmingham, before getting into trouble and moving back to Mytholmroyd to escape the authorities. Once returned to his home at Bell House farmhouse (which is now a bed & breakfast accommodation with educational facilities) David used ironworking as a cover to clip or file the edges from gold coins, milling the edges back so the change was all but unnoticeable, and making counterfeit coins from the shavings whilst returning the clipped coins into circulation. David’s activities soon spread to other farms, with families at nearby Hill Top Farm and Keelham Farm soon becoming involved; forming the beginnings of the gang of Cragg Vale Coiners. Local publicans also helped by placing the counterfeit coins into circulation. David Hartley seems to have been an enigmatic leader, becoming known as 'King David' Hartley and the gang’s numbers grew considerably until well over 30 individuals were involved. Rumours of the gang's activities reached the authorities, who sent an excise man named William Deighton to investigate. One of the coiners turned King’s Evidence and betrayed the gang, leading to Hartley's arrest at an Inn in Halifax on 14th October 1769. Hartley's brother Isaac offered £100 to anybody who would kill Deighton. It is alleged that the plotters planned Deighton's murder at an Inn in Mytholmroyd called Barbary's, which is now gone, but was located on the opposite side of the road to the present day Dusty Miller. On November 10th 1769 at Bull Close Lane near Halifax, Deighton was approached by two men, Matthew Normanton and Robert Thomas. Deighton was shot dead, his body also showing signs of having been stamped on. Just days later, the Government offered a reward of £100 for information leading to the arrest of the murderers and a pardon for anybody, bar the killers, who would turn King's Evidence. Over 30 people were subsequently arrested, including 'King David' Hartley, who was sentenced to death on April 6th 1770 and hanged at Tynburn, near York, on April 28th. His body is buried in the graveyard of the village of Heptonstall, above Hebden Bridge. Robert Thomas was acquitted of Deighton's murder, but was later hanged in 1774 for being a highwayman. Matthew Normanton initially fled the authorities, but was later caught and hanged in 1775. Isaac Hartley was never brought to trial due to a lack of evidence and died in 1815, aged 78. Heptonstall Museum has on display some of the original dies used by the Coiners to stamp their gold discs into coins, as well as panels telling more of their story.
  4. Walking in Calderdale

    Across Calderdale

    Walking in Calderdale

    The stunning landscapes of Calderdale offer walks that are suitable for all ages and abilities. There’s n...

    The stunning landscapes of Calderdale offer walks that are suitable for all ages and abilities. There’s no better way to immerse yourself and discover more about this beautiful area than on foot.

    Read our Walking in Calderdale blog post for information aboiut guided walks, E Trails, walking guides, easy & family walking and ideas for great walking routes to follow, such as The Calderdale Way, the Pennine Way & Hebden Bridge Loop, Todmorden Centenary Way and great walks at Hardcastle Crags, Ogden Water and more!

  5. Far Barsey Farm Shop

    Barkisland

    Far Barsey Farm Shop

    Local Family Run Farm Shop producing and selling Top Quality Home Reared Beef. Succulent Lamb, Pork, Chicken & Game. Award Winning Sausages and an ...
    Local Family Run Farm Shop producing and selling Top Quality Home Reared Beef. Succulent Lamb, Pork, Chicken & Game. Award Winning Sausages and an Extensive BBQ Range. Fresh Fruit and Vegetables, Homemade Cakes, Pies and Pastries, Delicatessen & a wide range of cheeses, Ready Meals, Wines & Beers, Jams & Preserves, Ice Cream & Giftware. Everything from a simple tea to the Ultimate Dinner Party.

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