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  1. Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax

    Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnific...
    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnificent 180ft tower and spire which is enriched with sculpture. Free guided tours of Halifax Town Hall can be arranged to help you learn more about its fascinating history. Please contact the Mayor's Office on 01422 393022.
  2. Lister Lane Cemetery

    Halifax

    Lister Lane Cemetery

    The Halifax General Cemetery, Lister Lane, was opened in 1841. Today, the Cemetery has Grade II listed status and has many interesting monuments, p...
    The Halifax General Cemetery, Lister Lane, was opened in 1841. Today, the Cemetery has Grade II listed status and has many interesting monuments, particularly the gothic spires and obelisks along the main pathway. The Cemetery has been recognised as a Significant Cemetery in Europe, one of only 13 in the UK, putting it alongside such famous cemeteries as Highgate in London. Lister Lane Cemetery covers three acres of land, laid out around a now derelict neo-classical chapel and a raised terrace with views across Halifax to Beacon Hill. The Cemetery is open to the public on Wednesdays from 10am - 3.30pm and most Sundays (weather permitting) from 10am - 12pm when the Friends of the Cemetery are working there.
  3. Wainhouse Tower, Halifax

    Halifax

    Wainhouse Tower

    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The ...
    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The structure was never actually used as a working chimney and as such, is regarded by many as one of Britain's finest follies. The Tower is open to the public on Bank Holidays (please see below for the 2018 dates) and is available for Private Ascents. For those brave enough to tackle the 403 steps to the viewing gallery at the top, the stunning views make it well worth the climb. Click on the hyperlink below for video photo take using a drone of the awesome views from the top of the tower! The tower is open on bank holidays, between 11am to 4pm (last ascent 3.30pm) on the following dates: Easter Monday April 22nd May Day Monday May 6th Spring Bank Monday May 27th August Bank Monday August 26th Adult £3 Children & Adult Passport to Leisure Holders (PPL) £2.50 Child PPL £2 Family ticket ( 2 Adult & 2 Children ) £10 Private ascent for 1.5 hrs Maximum 50 people £150 (£125 + vat) for a week day viewing £210 (£175+vat) for a Saturday viewing £300 (£250 + vat) for a Sunday viewing
  4. The Birchcliffe Centre

    Hebden Bridge

    The Birchcliffe Centre

    The Birchcliffe Centre is owned by the charity Pennine Heritage, created as a result of efforts to save the magnificent Birchcliffe Baptist Chapel,...
    The Birchcliffe Centre is owned by the charity Pennine Heritage, created as a result of efforts to save the magnificent Birchcliffe Baptist Chapel, which now houses the Centre. The Birchcliffe Centre is now an expansive conference, exhibition and events venue. home to the Pennine Horizons Digital Archive, the Hebden Bridge Local History Society, the After Alice Project, and a number of valued tenants. The auditorium, mezzanine and yoga studio are all available for hire. All monies received go towards furthering the charitable aims of Pennine Heritage.
  5. Electric Bowl, Halifax

    Halifax

    Electric Bowl

    Electric Bowl provides 10 pin bowling at its best. Featuring electronic scoring and automated bumper system, with bowling ramps available for junio...
    Electric Bowl provides 10 pin bowling at its best. Featuring electronic scoring and automated bumper system, with bowling ramps available for juniors and anybody who needs them.Try some Glow in the Dark Bowling on Friday and Saturday nights. The fun doesn’t stop when the bowling ends. Pool, air hockey and amusement machines keep the whole family entertained. There's also 18 full sized Snooker tables, 8 American Pool tables, 10 Race Car Simulators and 2 amazing Golf and Sports Simulators. Three bars and kitchens serve food and drink all day. Something for everyone and all under one roof!
  6. Halifax Music Heritage Trail

    Halifax

    Halifax Music Heritage Trail

    Halifax has a surprising and quite amazing music history. From Dusty Springfield, Rod Stewart, Iggy Pop to Joy Division, Pulp, The Cure, The Jackso...
    Halifax has a surprising and quite amazing music history. From Dusty Springfield, Rod Stewart, Iggy Pop to Joy Division, Pulp, The Cure, The Jacksons, the list of artists who have played the town is long and diverse. The Halifax Music Heritage Trail, created by Michael Ainsworth and Trevor Simpson, celebrates this important cultural history of our town.
  7. Smith Art Gallery, Brighouse

    Brighouse

    Smith Art Gallery & Brighouse Library

    This purpose built Art Gallery and public library, known as ‘The Rydings’, is surrounded by a beautiful park and gardens. The front gallery host...
    This purpose built Art Gallery and public library, known as ‘The Rydings’, is surrounded by a beautiful park and gardens. The front gallery hosts an exhibition of oil paintings, based on People and Places, including works by Atkinson Grimshaw, Marcus Stone and Thomas Sydney Cooper. The rear gallery hosts changing displays, covering a wide variety of themes from local artists to touring exhibitions, including photography, mixed media and sculpture, ensuring there is always something new and different to enjoy. The gallery was built by Alderman William Smith and donated, along with his collection of artwork, to the people of Brighouse in 1907. The Smith Art Gallery provides a pleasant atmosphere to meet your friends, interact with beautiful paintings and do the family gallery hunt/trail. There is also an exciting programme of temporary exhibitions in a range of media from paintings to photography and textiles, providing a wonderful experience each time you visit.
  8. Mount Zion Methodist Heritage Chapel

    Halifax

    Mount Zion Methodist Heritage Chapel

    A historic site rich in Methodist history, Mount Zion Methodist Heritage Chapel offers you the chance to explore a beautiful heritage building a...

    A historic site rich in Methodist history, Mount Zion Methodist Heritage Chapel offers you the chance to explore a beautiful heritage building and enjoy a cream tea in the summer months!

    Mount Zion has a unique part in the history of Methodism, with John Wesley staying in the cottage (in the room now known as The Prophet's Chamber) adjoining the Chapel, when he was travelling between preaching appointments in the 1700's.

    Mount Zion is home to the world-renowned Horace Hird Methodist Pottery Collection - come and see the many interesting pieces that comprise our collection.

    The Chapel is open to the public between April and September every Tuesday 2pm-4pm. Light refreshments in the form of a cuppa and biscuits are available for a small donation. On the Tuesdays in June, July and August Yorkshire Cream Teas are also available, with homemade scones baked fresh that day, homemade jam (which is sometimes also available for sale), butter and freshly whipped cream. The cream teas come with unlimited tea or coffee (speciality teas and cordials are also available) for only £4 per person. Free Wi-Fi is available during your visit.

    Guided tours can be arranged on request outside of our usual April-September opening times. We also hold various artistic exhibitions, occasional musical concerts and open days throughout the year, with musical accompaniment, occasional local historical and Methodist history talks and refreshments. Please see our website and Facebook page for details. Please email Circuit Heritage Officer Mr. John Wilson regarding visits and other activities such as weddings, at  chme@calderdalemethodists.org.uk.

    Parking is limited on Per Lane, so if you visit us by car, please park safely and considerately on the roadside. There is a regular 504 bus service to Denholme from Halifax, that goes along the A629,  allowing you to get off at the bus stop at the top of Per Lane. Mount Zion Chapel is only a 200 metre walk along Per Lane from the A629 Keighley Road.

    Please take care when using the flagged path approaching the Chapel. The flags are uneven and can be slippery when wet.

  9. Bankfield Museum, Halifax

    Halifax

    Bankfield Museum

    A Museum since 1887, Bankfield tells the story of Halifax and Calderdale, using its rich and diverse collections. Set in the attractive surround...
    A Museum since 1887, Bankfield tells the story of Halifax and Calderdale, using its rich and diverse collections. Set in the attractive surroundings of Akroyd Park, at the centre of Akroydon model village conservation area, this Victorian mansion was the home of local mill owner, philanthropist and MP, Colonel Edward Akroyd. We are a short distance from the centre of Halifax, with free parking and close to public transport links. Bankfield’s exhibitions cover local history, costume, art, toys, military history, jewellery and textiles from around the world. Our collections contain objects from Ancient Egypt through to the 21st Century as we continue to collect and preserve items for future generations.
  10. Stoodley Pike Monument

    Todmorden

    Stoodley Pike Monument

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The...

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The monument was designed in 1854 by local architect James Green, and completed in 1856 at the end of the Crimean War.

    The monument replaced an earlier structure, commemorating the defeat of Napoleon and the surrender of Paris. It was completed in 1815, after the Battle of Waterloo, but collapsed in 1854 after decades of weathering and a lightning strike.

    You can only reach the Pike on foot, as there is no vehicular or bicycle access to the monument. Stoodley Pike is accessible by well-defined Right of Way footpaths. The Pennine Way also passes Stoodley Pike. There are many walking routes to the Pike from Todmorden, Hebden Bridge and Mytholmroyd. Walking guides to all these routes available from local Visitor Centres and the Heart of the Pennines online shop.

    Stoodley Pike Monument contains a spiral staircase of 39 steps, accessed from its north side. If you visit, please be aware that several of the internal steps are in darkness, so it’s useful to have a torch to light your way, as there are no windows. The entrance to the balcony is on the Monument’s west face, some 40 feet above ground level. The views are well worth the walk and the climb!

  11. eptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Heptonstall

    Heptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One...
    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One of the first octagonal chapels, it is one of the oldest Methodist churches in continuous use today. This unusual octagonal chapel is open every day. It’s tucked away at the bottom of a flight of steps off Northgate. Entry is free, with donations to the upkeep of the Chapel welcome. Please email Circuit Heritage Officer Mr. John Wilson regarding visits and other activities, at chme@calderdalemethodists.org.uk. Methodism in Heptonstall began with the firebrand Scot William Darney. He founded many societies on both sides of the Pennines as he travelled, preaching as he went. The Heptonstall “Darney Society” was visited by Charles and John Wesley in 1747. In these early days, Heptonstall had a preacher every sixth Sunday, with the travelling preachers receiving no stipend or allowance, eating where they could. John Wesley continued to visit Heptonstall and there were always immense crowds to hear him. The society was so successful it was decided to build a chapel. The octagon shape was then fashionable for Methodist preaching houses, as it avoided conflict with the established church. The building was finished in 1764. It was intended to hold 200 people, but by 1802 there were 337 members and over 1000 scholars. The solution was to knock down the far end of the chapel, lengthen the walls and rebuild it, preserving its octagonal shape. Heptonstall is located on The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route that circles the borough of Calderdale. Please call in to visit the Chapel if you're passing by.
  12. Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum

    Halifax

    Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum

    Representing over 300 years of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, since its raising in 1702, this museum tells the stories of the soldiers who serv...
    Representing over 300 years of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, since its raising in 1702, this museum tells the stories of the soldiers who served using their own words. The ‘Iron Duke’, Arthur Wellesley, was the Colonel of the 33rd which became, after his death, the only Regiment to be named after a person not of the Royal Blood. Displays include items relating to the Duke himself and to the rich and varied history of the regiment, including the campaigns of 33rd and 76th foot. The Duke of Wellington’s Regiment has a long association with the town of Halifax and its location within Bankfield Museum complements the wider history on display here. FREE Admission
  13. The Piece Hall Photo by Paul White Photography

    Halifax

    The Piece Hall

    The Piece Hall is unique. A Grade I listed Georgian masterpiece and the oldest remaining cloth hall in Britain.

    Following a multi-millio...

    The Piece Hall is unique. A Grade I listed Georgian masterpiece and the oldest remaining cloth hall in Britain.

    Following a multi-million pound transformation project, Britain's magnificent and last surviving cloth hall is ready to welcome visitors again.

    The Grade I listed structure has stood at the heart of Halifax since 1779 and has now re-opened as a world class cultural, heritage and leisure destination.

    The huge open-air courtyard is surrounded by a mix of independent bars, restaurants, cafes, galleries and shops. The stories of Georgian Halifax are told in the specially created exhibition spaces, while the central courtyard plays host to a year-round events programme of music, dance, film and spectacle for up to 7,500 people at a time.

    Click here to watch a short video about the reopening of The Piece Hall

  14. Gibson Mill, Hardcastle Crags

    Hebden Bridge

    Hardcastle Crags & Gibson Mill

    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the...
    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the country. Gibson Mill is situated within Hardcastle Crags woodland beside Hebden Water. The National Trust have put in some superb waymarked walking routes suitable for all abilities. Cross the river on stepping stones and spot birds, insects, amphibians and if you're lucky; deer! You'll find Hardcastle Crags offers a completely different experience throughout the year - from the icicles of midwinter to the carpet of bluebells in the spring. The early 19th century Gibson Mill is situated within the site. A tour of the mill tells the history of the valley and the mill over the past 200 years. The mill also has changing exhibitions throughout the year. Gibson Mill is 100% self-sufficient in energy, water and waste treatment. It has a hydro-electric system, solar photovoltaic panels and a log-burning stove fuelled by wood from the estate. You can also rest and recharge at the Weaving Shed Café, serving delicious ethical and locally-produced food and buy the perfect gift or memento in the shop located there. Built in around 1800,Gibson Mill was one of the first mills of the Industrial Revolution. The mill was driven by a water wheel and produced cotton cloth up until 1890. In the early 1900s, Gibson Mill began to be used as an ‘entertainment emporium’ for the local people. After the Second World War, the mill slipped into disuse, and was acquired by the National Trust in 1950. Hardcastle Crags is open all year round from dawn until dusk, admission to Hardcastle Crags and Gibson Mill are FREE. Dogs are welcome (including in the café and mill) if kept under close control. GETTING THERE You have three options to get to Hardcastle Crags: By car - there is parking at Midgehole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AA) and Clough Hole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AZ). A parking fee applies at both car parks, although parking is free for National Trust members By bus – the 906 runs from Hebden Bridge on weekends between May and October. It will take you to both the bottom and the top of the valley. Walking – there is a route from Hebden Bridge on good paths with a bit of road walking. It will take you about 45 minutes. Pick up a guide from Hebden Bridge Visitor Centre. See below for details of the wildlife you can discover at Hardcastle Crags.
  15. Ruins of the Church of St Thomas a' Becket, Heptonstall

    Heptonstall

    Ruins of the Church of St Thomas a' Becket

    Uniquely, Heptonstall has two churches within one graveyard. At the centre of the village are the ruins of the Church of St Thomas a' Becket built ...
    Uniquely, Heptonstall has two churches within one graveyard. At the centre of the village are the ruins of the Church of St Thomas a' Becket built between 1256 and 1260. Later adaptations gave the Church two naves, two aisles and two chantry chapels as well as a tower. Following a great storm in 1847 the west face of the tower fell away. Some measure of repair took place and the church remained in use up to 1854 when the present church, St Thomas the Apostle, was completed at a cost of £7,000. The ruins of St Thomas a' Becket are carefully maintained and are open to the public. Open air services are occasionally conducted there.
  16. Gordon Rigg Garden Centre

    Todmorden

    Gordon Rigg Garden Centre

    Gordon Rigg Garden Centre, Todmorden, is one of the largest Garden Centres in the North West, enjoying over 60,000sq. ft. of retail space and was v...
    Gordon Rigg Garden Centre, Todmorden, is one of the largest Garden Centres in the North West, enjoying over 60,000sq. ft. of retail space and was voted best Garden Centre in the North, 2nd best in the UK by Which? Magazine! You'll be amazed at the variety and choice of products at both of our Garden Centres from our huge range of indoor and outdoor plants, garden furniture and wild bird care to garden tools, pet care, floristry, gifts, plus much, much more!

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