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  1. Bronte Boats, Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge

    Bronte Boats Canal Cruising

    Enjoy a day out on the beautiful Rochdale Canal, where the Pennine scenery and wildlife is spectacular. The Eleanor Rose is a luxurious 57ft cr...
    Enjoy a day out on the beautiful Rochdale Canal, where the Pennine scenery and wildlife is spectacular. The Eleanor Rose is a luxurious 57ft cruiser stern boat. She has 4 berths consisting of a fixed double and a kitchen/dinette. She has a full size kitchen with gas cooker, full size fridge, shower room and a very comfortable living area. For more details, price and availability, please contact us on 01706 815103 or visit our website for more information. The boats coerm with cutlery, plates etc. Tea & coffee is also provided.
  2. The Walled Garden at Manor Heath Park

    Halifax

    The Walled Garden at Manor Heath Park

    Open all year round, Manor Heath Park's Walled garden is part of this nineteen acre Green Flag Award and Yorkshire in Bloom Gold Award winning p...

    Open all year round, Manor Heath Park's Walled garden is part of this nineteen acre Green Flag Award and Yorkshire in Bloom Gold Award winning park.

    The Walled Garden was once used to grow flowers, fruit and vegetables for the former Manor Heath Mansion (you can read about the history of Manor Heath Park and the Mansion here) and is today used to demonstrate different types of gardening techniques of topical interest and bedding plant trials for Calderdale's parks.

    There are several sections in the walled garden:

    The Container Garden demonstrates the different ways of displaying plants in pots and hanging baskets.

    The Alpine Mint Walk. Enjoy the fragrance of the Corsican Mint planted between the paving stones. Bees and insects love the small blue flowers during the summer.

    The Rock Garden is made from local sandstone and planted with specialist alpines and bulbs.

    Herbaceous Borders using traditional plants for a magnificent summer flowering display.

    Prairie Planting. A bed specially designed and planted with grasses and some herbaceous perennials for very low maintenance i.e. no staking and only trimming back in spring. The coloured grasses and seed heads last right through the autumn and into winter.

    The Necklace Garden boasts tradtional plants and old-fashioned roses growing in a formal setting.

    The Winter Garden features plants of winter interest including flowers, stems, foliage and berries; to illustrate how gardens can still be attractive in winter.

    The Mediterranean Garden shows how plants normally found in the Med can be grown in Calderdale, with plenty of ideas for plants to grow in domestic gardens for the water conscious gardener. The gravel garden shows plants that will survive in hot, dry  places.

    Exhibition English Garden This professional design gives colour and texture throughout the growing season with many unusual plants and bulbs.

    Demonstration Beds. Watch out in summer for trials of new varieties of bedding plants and bedding schemes. If successful, some will be put into practice in flower beds across Calderdale. The Dahlias and Chrysanthemums are grown in the summer by volunteer growers who grow to show standards. We are very fortunate to have them helping us out and we thank them for the time they spend here.

    Rose Walk and Plummery. Enjoy the shade of the willow tunnel and rose walk; see the craftsmanship in the curved dry stone walls built from recycled stone. The Victoria Plum Trees were donated by members of the public. 

    Educational and school visits covering all stages of the national curriculaum can be arranged. Prior booking is essential, please phone Manor Heath on 01422 365631 or email parks@calderdale.gov.uk for more details. 

    When visiting the Walled Garden, you can also visit  The Jungle Experience and refresh with a cuppa and cake at The Flutterbites Cafe.

    Entrance to the Walled Garden and Mnaor Heath Park is FREE. 

    All year round opening times for the Walled Garden are:

    Opening time:10 am every day.

    Closing times: last entry 3.30pm, closed 3.45pm every day except Friday.

    Friday closing: last entry 3pm and closed 3.15pm.

    Educational visits to Manor Heath for schools covering the national curriculum can be arranged by Phoning 01422 365631 or emailing parks@calderdale.gov.uk. Booking is essential.

  3. Gibson Mill, Hardcastle Crags

    Hebden Bridge

    Hardcastle Crags & Gibson Mill

    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the...
    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the country. Gibson Mill is situated within Hardcastle Crags woodland beside Hebden Water. The National Trust have put in some superb waymarked walking routes suitable for all abilities. Cross the river on stepping stones and spot birds, insects, amphibians and if you're lucky; deer! You'll find Hardcastle Crags offers a completely different experience throughout the year - from the icicles of midwinter to the carpet of bluebells in the spring. The early 19th century Gibson Mill is situated within the site. A tour of the mill tells the history of the valley and the mill over the past 200 years. The mill also has changing exhibitions throughout the year. Gibson Mill is 100% self-sufficient in energy, water and waste treatment. It has a hydro-electric system, solar photovoltaic panels and a log-burning stove fuelled by wood from the estate. You can also rest and recharge at the Weaving Shed Café, serving delicious ethical and locally-produced food and buy the perfect gift or memento in the shop located there. Built in around 1800,Gibson Mill was one of the first mills of the Industrial Revolution. The mill was driven by a water wheel and produced cotton cloth up until 1890. In the early 1900s, Gibson Mill began to be used as an ‘entertainment emporium’ for the local people. After the Second World War, the mill slipped into disuse, and was acquired by the National Trust in 1950. Hardcastle Crags is open all year round from dawn until dusk, admission to Hardcastle Crags and Gibson Mill are FREE. Dogs are welcome (including in the café and mill) if kept under close control. GETTING THERE You have three options to get to Hardcastle Crags: By car - there is parking at Midgehole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AA) and Clough Hole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AZ). A parking fee applies at both car parks, although parking is free for National Trust members By bus – the 906 runs from Hebden Bridge on weekends between May and October. It will take you to both the bottom and the top of the valley. Walking – there is a route from Hebden Bridge on good paths with a bit of road walking. It will take you about 45 minutes. Pick up a guide from Hebden Bridge Visitor Centre. See below for details of the wildlife you can discover at Hardcastle Crags.
  4. Brown Paper Packages

    Halifax

    Brown Paper Packages

    Brown Paper Packages is an inviting shop stocking a wide range of gifts and crafts for the home focusing on local and national artisans. Home in...
    Brown Paper Packages is an inviting shop stocking a wide range of gifts and crafts for the home focusing on local and national artisans. Home interior accessories include cushions, candles and throws and locally made crafted items of fused glass, turned wood, memo boards and lampshapes. There's also a beautiful selection of handicraft items for home crafts, including ribbons, buttons and lace.
  5. Halifax Railway Station

    Halifax

    Halifax Railway Station

    The Caldervale line runs through the area with stations at Halifax, Brighouse, Sowerby Bridge, Mytholmroyd, Hebden Bridge, Walsden and Todmorden. ...
    The Caldervale line runs through the area with stations at Halifax, Brighouse, Sowerby Bridge, Mytholmroyd, Hebden Bridge, Walsden and Todmorden. Trains run from Blackpool North to York via Hebden Bridge and Halifax and from Leeds via Bradford to Manchester Victoria via all stations. It is also possible to travel to Leeds via Dewsbury from Mytholmroyd and Sowerby Bridge. A direct train service operated by Grand Central runs from London to Halifax and Brighouse three times a day.
  6. Rokt Climbing Gym

    Brighouse

    ROKT Climbing Gym

    Adrenalin pumping, heart stopping, fear inducing! The unique Rokt Climbing Gym offers indoor climbing at its best and the highest outdoor climbi...

    Adrenalin pumping, heart stopping, fear inducing! The unique Rokt Climbing Gym offers indoor climbing at its best and the highest outdoor climbing wall in the UK: the ROKTFACE!

    Whether you're an experienced climber, you're a little rusty, or you've never climbed before - old or young are welcome to use our facilities.

    Bring the little ones… The Kids Attics is a great space for your kids to play and climb in safety. There are small climbing wall, mini boulders, a ball pool and seating. So why not bring the little ones with you next time the old ones are on a session or off climbing. We have tea, coffee & snacks available from reception.

    Climbers now have an Olympic-class bouldering and training arena to thrive in after a new £100,000 facility opened its doors. Stretching across the top two floors, the Northlight at ROKT has been created in Rokt's colossal loft. It features “next-level bouldering”, with 1/4 km2 of curved and acutely angled bouldering walls, slabs, barrels and overhangs using the latest holds and coatings.

    Whether you’ve never climbed anything more than a fence or you compete in national competitions, there's something for you at ROKT!

    We're located only a hundred metres from the route of The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route that circles the whole borough. Drop in and see us if you're passing by.

    Click here to watch a short video about Rokt Climbing Gym from The Yorkshire Post.

  7. The Pennine Way

    Todmorden

    The Pennine Way

    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of ...

    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of England and offers 268 miles of the finest upland walking in England. A once in a lifetime experience.

    The Pennine Way enters Calderdale at Blackstone Edge, passing Stoodley Pike, dropping down into the valley at Callis, climbing back up to Colden and over the moors to Widdop. Walkers often say this stretch of over 20 miles is one of the best on the whole route. The Trail is very well way-marked and there are some great views from the route (especially from the iconic Stoodley Pike).

    If you want to detour into Hebden Bridge on your way, you can use the Hebden Bridge Loop developed in 2015.

    For more information about walking in Calderdale, please visit our Walking page.

  8. Orangebox Young People's Centre

    Halifax

    The Orange Box Young People's Centre

    Young people from across the borough can access a climbing wall, a skate park on the roof, music and recording studio, Youthworks for more individu...
    Young people from across the borough can access a climbing wall, a skate park on the roof, music and recording studio, Youthworks for more individual support and access to ICT with state of the art equipment. Project Challenge, a youth work charity is based there, along with the Youth Justice Service who have moved from Threeways and now have the right interview facilities to work with their young people. The Gateway club for children with disabilities meets there every week. Do encourage young people in the borough to make use of this great facility; there is a full programme in place
  9. Wainhouse Tower, Halifax photo by Alastair Wallace

    Halifax

    Wainhouse Tower

    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The ...
    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The structure was never actually used as a working chimney and as such, is regarded by many as one of Britain's finest follies. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Wainhouse Tower was open to the public on the Bank Holidays, for those brave enough to tackle the 403 steps to the viewing gallery at the top, the stunning views make it well worth the climb. We hope that it will be possible to reopen the Tower to visitors in 2021 and will add any dates the Tower may be open to the public here when and if they are confirmed. A Brief History of Wainhouse Tower Born in 1817 John Edward Wainhouse inherited his Uncle’s Dyeworks on Washer Lane, Halifax in 1856. The Dyeworks were typical of the day, causing considerable pollution because of smoke emissions. Halifax was badly affected by smog. For weeks on end the smoke laden atmosphere blanketed the town, reducing sunlight and contaminating the landscape with soot and sulphur trioxide. This national problem caused the Government to introduce a Smoke Abatement Act. Wainhouse developed the idea of building a chimney 350 metres up the hillside from the Dyeworks, connected to it by an underground tunnel. Sir Henry Edwards, A wealthy neighbour of John Edward Wainhouse, made complaints about the smoke nuisance caused by the Dyeworks, leading to a feud between the two men. Mr Isaac Booth (who was also Sir Henry’s architect) was asked by Wainhouse to design and build the mill chimney. The design incorporated an internal staircase that led to four balcony features. This exacerbated the deepening feud between Wainhouse and Sir Henry. Sir Henry, an extrovert and boastful man, claimed that his private estate at Pye Nest could not be viewed from any house o the hills. Wainhouse said he would rectify this by putting an observatory at the top of his chimney. Work commenced in 1871. In 1873, as a result of the feuding; the architect Isaac Booth decided he could no longer work for either man. This led to the appointment of Richard Swarbrick Dugdale, who redesigned the upper section of the building. The new design incorporated a corbelled and balustrade balcony, surmounted by a lantern dome and finial. The building was completed on the 9th September 1875. It is estimated that over 9,000 tonnes of materials were used. The total cost is thought to be in the region of £15,000. However, by the time the building was completed, it was clear that it would never be used as a chimney. The Washer Lane Dyeworks had been sold in 1874 to the works manager Mr Henry Mossman. The sale did not include the Tower. It is thought that Mossman saw the then uncompleted building to be a liability. This point of view is difficult to understand given the fact that Mossman was then prosecuted under the Smoke Abatement Act. Mossman proved that considerable efforts were made to abate the smoke nuisance by pulling down six existing small chimneys …and erecting a large chimney in their place! John Edward Wainhouse died on 26th July 1883 at the age of 66. He as buried in the family grave at Holy Trinity Churchyard, Halifax. The gravestone is located against the boundary wall on the south side of the Church. The Tower and three acres of surrounding land was sold by auction in 1887. The Tower changed hands several times until coming under the ownership of the Halifax Corporation in 1919. During the Second World War the Tower was used by the military authorities as an observation post. As a result of the reorganisation of Local Government in 1974, Wainhouse Tower became the property of Calderdale Council. Today the Tower is used as a viewing platform; open to the public on Bank Holidays and other select days through the year
  10. St John's Cottage

    Halifax

    St John's Cottage

    Sleep in style at this beautifully furnished, one bedroom residence split over three floors. Close to all the amenities you could wish for, this se...
    Sleep in style at this beautifully furnished, one bedroom residence split over three floors. Close to all the amenities you could wish for, this serviced property is ideal for couples, commuters, friends or single travellers looking for accommodation in a convenient location. At a much lower rate than a hotel, this property allows you to save your money for the many things to do in West Yorkshire. As you open the front door of the cottage, a warm and inviting living room greets you with a traditional cast iron fireplace providing a grand feature piece. Lit by luxurious glass hanging chandeliers, the room contains soft comfortable furnishings including a two-seater sofa with plump cushions, a shag pile rug and fluffy homely textures. With a large, smart TV, Freesat, Radio, CD & DVD player and unlimited Wi-Fi, it’s easy to keep yourself and guests entertained every evening. Entrance through a wooden cottage door takes you to the lower ground floor where there is a large kitchen with dark slate floors and plenty of storage. Complete with a large, belfast sink and modern appliances including a Kenwood range cooker, hob, washer/dryer, fridge/freezer and microwave; budding chefs will feel right at home in this glorious kitchen. A table for two awaits, whether you want to take advantage of the fully equipped facilities or order food directly to your door for an even easier dining experience. To the first floor is the master bedroom, which is filled with decorative touches that give this property so much charm and character. Another original cast iron fireplace gives the room a romantic feel, alongside the crushed velvet bedframe and embellished cushions and throws. A comfy mattress means your bed is ready to leap into! Adjoining this fabulous bedroom is an en-suite bathroom with a large corner bathtub, shower, sink and toilet.
  11. Cycle Calderdale

    Across Calderdale

    Cycle Calderdale

    The Calderdale Cycle Hub has been set up by cycling groups and organisations who wish to promote all things cycling in the Calderdale area. On t...
    The Calderdale Cycle Hub has been set up by cycling groups and organisations who wish to promote all things cycling in the Calderdale area. On the website you will find the latest information on cycling events in the area and downloadable trails and maps.
  12. Coffee Cali - Halifax

    Halifax

    Coffee Cali - Halifax

    A Yorkshire based, family run coffee chain. The Halifax branch is located in a timber framed building, with red coloured timbers faithful to the or...
    A Yorkshire based, family run coffee chain. The Halifax branch is located in a timber framed building, with red coloured timbers faithful to the original colour scheme.
  13. Moon-Bean-Cafe-&-Deli

    Sowerby Bridge

    Moon Bean Cafe & Delicatessen

    We have many vegetarian, vegan and GF options
    We have many vegetarian, vegan and GF options
  14. Lister Lane Cemetery

    Halifax

    Lister Lane Cemetery

    The Halifax General Cemetery, Lister Lane, was opened in 1841. Today, the Cemetery has Grade II listed status and has many interesting monuments, p...
    The Halifax General Cemetery, Lister Lane, was opened in 1841. Today, the Cemetery has Grade II listed status and has many interesting monuments, particularly the gothic spires and obelisks along the main pathway. The Cemetery has been recognised as a Significant Cemetery in Europe, one of only 13 in the UK, putting it alongside such famous cemeteries as Highgate in London. Lister Lane Cemetery covers three acres of land, laid out around a now derelict neo-classical chapel and a raised terrace with views across Halifax to Beacon Hill. The Cemetery is open to the public on Wednesdays from 10am - 3.30pm and most Sundays (weather permitting) from 10am - 12pm when the Friends of the Cemetery are working there.
  15. Le Munch Bunch

    Halifax

    Le Munch Bunch

    We are an Artisan sandwich shop in Halifax offering a wide range of tasty food and drinks, made fresh with quality ingredients. Our food and dri...
    We are an Artisan sandwich shop in Halifax offering a wide range of tasty food and drinks, made fresh with quality ingredients. Our food and drink is made with care to be delicious, hearty and full of goodness. We have a varied menu with changing specials and seasonal delicacies, including: oven-baked jacket potatoes with your choice of topping self-serve crisp and colourful salad bar gluten-free cakes and bread traditional sandwiches, panini, filled ciabatta rolls, wraps, bagels and even foot long sandwiches, Turkish flatbreads, plus a selection of hot or cold fillings homemade soups, stews and chilli freshly ground, barista-style coffee fresh fruit smoothies daily specials and meal offers Email us at : info@lemunchbunch.co.uk
  16. The Trading Rooms

    Halifax

    The Trading Rooms

    The family-friendly Trading Rooms restaurant, with its own bakery, looks out over the spectacular Piece Hall Courtyard and is open from breakfast t...
    The family-friendly Trading Rooms restaurant, with its own bakery, looks out over the spectacular Piece Hall Courtyard and is open from breakfast to dinner with imaginative menu changes through the day. The restaurant has an interesting, contemporary feel, while keeping one foot firmly in its heritage. All dishes are freshly made using the highest quality, locally-sourced produce, providing great tasting food. The open plan kitchen has its own charcoal grill and the basement kitchen provides delicious bread and cakes through The Bakery The artisan loaves produced and sold in The Bakery are used in the restaurant. Opening Times: Monday-Wednesday: 8am-6pm Thursday: 8am-9pm Friday-Saturday: 8am-11pm Sunday: 9am-5pm

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