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  1. Al's-Emporium

    Halifax

    Al's Emporium

    West Yorkshire family-run business, Al’s Emporium, sells antique, retro & vintage style furniture and collectables. They also support local artists...
    West Yorkshire family-run business, Al’s Emporium, sells antique, retro & vintage style furniture and collectables. They also support local artists and “wannabe Lord Sugars” by renting out glass display cabinets, showcasing handmade crafts, collectables, antiques, militaria, art and the weird & wonderful. There is always an eclectic mix of different items at Al’s Emporium to suit all pockets and tastes. Al’s Emporium has moved to The Piece Hall from a high street shop in the market town of Todmorden to concentrate on promoting their smaller items of vintage & antique furniture and collectables. Al’s Emporium gained its name from a long standing family joke, at the expense of its owner, Alan Sargent, part of the husband and wife team who own the family business. It was the nickname given to Alan’s storage unit which family and friends referred to as “Al’s Emporium” because of the amount of items stored in it. Alan and Simone are working towards Al’s Emporium becoming a “must-go-to” shop at The Piece Hall where customers will always receive a first class service and a warm Yorkshire welcome.
  2. Hebden Bridge Hostel

    Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge Hostel

    "A very special place… wonderful hosts... a jewel in the Pennines” Hebden Bridge Hostel (aka Mama Weirdigans) is located in a former concert hal...
    "A very special place… wonderful hosts... a jewel in the Pennines” Hebden Bridge Hostel (aka Mama Weirdigans) is located in a former concert hall adjacent to a Grade II listed Baptist Chapel. The hostel provides friendly, comfortable accommodation in four-bed dorms, a 6 -bed bunk room and in private rooms for 2 to 4 people. Every room has its own toilet, shower and wash basin and a light breakfast is provided. Nestled into woodland and yet only a short walk from the town centre, river and canal; the hostel makes a good base for hiking, sight-seeing, shopping or experiencing Hebden's vibrant music and arts scene. Handy for the Pennine way, Calderdale Way and Hebden - Haworth walks.
  3. Dean Clough, photo by Bruce Fitzgerald

    Halifax

    Dean Clough

    Dean Clough is a vibrant 22-acre mixed-use mill complex, stretching half a mile in length, on the edge of Halif...

    Dean Clough is a vibrant 22-acre mixed-use mill complex, stretching half a mile in length, on the edge of Halifax town centre. Once the home of Crossley Carpets, the world’s largest carpet manufacturer, it’s now a thriving community which combines arts and culture, leisure facilities, restaurants, bars, cafes, shops, event spaces, offices and a hotel.

    The site boasts an abundance of arts and culture with six galleries, a subterranean theatre (the Viaduct Theatre), two resident theatre companies (Northern Broadsides and IOU), a permanent art collection with over 300 original works on display, a dedicated arts mill and studios which are home to 25 artists and numerous art organisations.

    There is a fabulous array of local independent food and drink establishments, catering for a range of tastes with four restaurants, a gaming-themed bar and diner, a real ale pub, a coffee roastery and two cafes.

    In addition to a Jack Wills outlet store, the Prestige Flowers Gift Shop and the Design Shop, there are beauty salons, hairdressers, gyms and a karate dojo for those who like a workout!

    At the heart of the site is The Arches, a spectacularly stylish industrial venue, perfect for incredibly individual weddings and exclusive events. With a highly-experienced events team, The Arches is a much sought after venue for charity balls, proms, private parties and corporate events. The space is very versatile with formal dinners seating up to 300 people, with the added benefit of a Travelodge hotel on site for overnight stays.

    Across the year there are a variety of events which take place all across Dean Clough, whether in the restaurants, specific events spaces, the art galleries or in the artists’ studios. Recent events have included drive-in movies, art exhibitions, live music, life drawing, a bierkeller, lunch with Prue Leith and lots more. See the What’s On page on our website for current and future events.

    For families there is the Dean Clough Trail. This free trail takes approximately 1 hour to complete and the clues lead across the Dean Clough site (both inside and out). Those following the trail will get to see the huge Dean Clough Lego model and will be tested to see if they can walk along the old railway tracks, amongst many things. The trail leaflets are available from Main Reception in D Mill. 

    Visitors are welcome seven days a week and the public mills are open from 9am to 5pm (from 10am on a Sunday). Parking charges apply during the week (but not at weekends and after 6pm during the week). Otherwise, the site is 'free entry'.

    More information about Dean Clough can be found on the website, on social media or by calling Dean Clough reception on 01422 250250.

  4. Jitterbug Jean, Piece Hall, Halifax, Calderdale

    Halifax

    Jitterbug Jean

    Jitterbug Jean shows off the quirky styles of vintage Rockabilly. Offering a range of clothing from classic swing dresses, floral prints and th...
    Jitterbug Jean shows off the quirky styles of vintage Rockabilly. Offering a range of clothing from classic swing dresses, floral prints and the eye popping Irregular Choice shoes that will complete your outfit. Brands inlcude Lindy Bop, Lady Vintage London, Banned, Hell Bunny and Irregular Choice shoes. Opening Hours: Monday - Saturday 10am-6pm Sunday 11am-5pm
  5. Bowers Mill Hotel

    Halifax

    Bowers Mill Hotel

    COMING SOON in 2021. Bowers Mill is more than an unforgettable aparthotel experience, it’s eleven! Each and every one of our luxuriously appoin...
    COMING SOON in 2021. Bowers Mill is more than an unforgettable aparthotel experience, it’s eleven! Each and every one of our luxuriously appointed rooms has its own very special theme, so you can take something different away, no matter how many times you come to visit. Built in the 18th century as a water powered fulling mill, Bowers Mill became both a corn mill and a woollen mill, before brothers, Joseph and Samuel Taylor, started manufacturing textiles in 1882. Situated between Barkisland and Stainland in West Yorkshire, Bowers Mill is perfectly located for exploring Calderdale and beyond. Leeds and Manchester may be within easy access via the M62 motorway, but you’ll feel a world away. Go walking. Do business. Bring the family. Make us the base for your wedding guests. Or simply relax and soak in our panoramic views of the beautiful Ryburn valley countryside and charming onsite lake. At first glance our aparthotel building takes you back to a time when gentlemen had cloth caps and ladies wore shawls – and both of those garments were made in the Bowers Mill. But then you step inside and the cutting-edge design and the contemporary vibe brings you hurtling right back to the here and now. Email enquiries: Katie.duce@bowersmillhotel.com
  6. Calderdale Industrial Museum, Halifax

    Halifax

    Calderdale Industrial Museum

    Calderdale Industrial Museum is now open on Thursdays during the school summer holidays in addition to the regular Saturday openings!

    The visits are slightly different on a Thursday to a Saturday - visitors are taken on a guided tour around the Museum and you’ll have the opportunity to see the volunteers at work in the Museum. You will also be able to see how work is progressing on the new “Fleece to Piece” display on the Museum’s top floor.

    The Museum houses a collection of industrial machinery and artifacts over four floors. Some of the machines are the only surviving examples in the country and have been placed in settings to give a close representation to the time when they were fully operational in the not too distant past.

    Down in the basement, the oil engine ‘Sadie’ provides motive power for part of an extensive collection of locally-manufactured machine tools, including lathes, drills and planers. You can take in the experience of nineteenth century Mytholm Coal Mine, learn about stone extraction and the exploitation of clay in the fireclay industries.

    The Power Gallery on the ground floor illustrates the story of power generation, from the water wheel to the internal combustion engine, by way of steam and electricity. The availability of power, initially from the numerous well-fed streams throughout Calderdale, was key to the growth of local industry.

    The first floor displays products that were made in Calderdale. World-famous names such as Mackintosh’s Toffees and Crossley’s carpets were everyday brands originating in Halifax.

    The top floor is still to be renovated and will be opened progressively over the next few years. The objective is to develop and present the story of how worsted cloth is manufactured from sheep’s wool.

    The Museum is operated by the Calderdale Industrial Museum Association (CIMA). a registered charity and dedicated group of enthusiastic volunteers.

    A great opportunity to witness the rise of the Industrial Revolution in the Calder Valley!

    Adults: £5 Concessions (senior citizens & students): £4 Accompanied Children aged up to 16: FREE

    Keep up to date with our Facebook page

  7. Ted Hughes

    Mytholmroyd

    Ted Hughes

    Edward James Hughes (1930-1998) was born at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, on the 17th Augus...

    Edward James Hughes (1930-1998) was born at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, on the 17th August 1930. He lived there until he was seven, when his family moved to Mexborough. During his childhood he spent many hours exploring the countryside around Mytholmroyd, and these experiences and the influences of the landscape on him were to inform much of his later poetry.

    One of the greatest poets of his generation, Hughes also wrote stories, plays, reviews and essays. He translated the work of, amongst others, Ovid, Racine, Aeschylus and Euripides. He wrote extensively for children, including the story The Iron Man, which was turned into the Disney blockbuster The Iron Giant. Hughes's interests in other art forms led to many collaborations, most famously with the artist Leonard Baskin.

    Although best known in the UK, Hughes was a writer of international standing. He won numerous awards throughout his career, including four for his final collection, Birthday Letters. Hughes became Poet Laureate in 1984 until his death on 28th October 1998.

    You can explore Ted's Yorkshire with the Discovering Ted Hughes's Yorkshire project; a series of route maps that take you on an encounter with the Yorkshire landscapes that formed and inspired Ted Hughes; Mytholmroyd and the Upper Calder Valley, Mexborough and the lower valleys of the Don and Dearne and Patrington in East Yorkshire. Find out more about the project here

    Ted’s birthplace at #1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd is available as a holiday let - the ideal place to stay for budding writers or for Ted’s fans to draw inspiration from the area.

  8. Jewella

    Halifax

    Jewella

    Jewella is an emporium of beautiful jewellery and accessories from leading brands in the UK. Think fashionable statement necklaces and stunning pie...
    Jewella is an emporium of beautiful jewellery and accessories from leading brands in the UK. Think fashionable statement necklaces and stunning pieces encrusted with semi-precious stones and Swarovski crystals. Add glamour to your wardrobe with contemporary and vintage inspired pieces.
  9. Joseph-Chance-Fashion-Piece-Hall

    Halifax

    Joseph Chance

    Joseph Chance have an exclusive collection of items for men, including a selection of scarves, ties, cufflinks, leather goods, hip flasks and belts...
    Joseph Chance have an exclusive collection of items for men, including a selection of scarves, ties, cufflinks, leather goods, hip flasks and belts that have been selected for their craftsmanship. Many items are made locally, including leather belts from Hebden Bridge, handprinted pocket squares and hand enameled cufflinks.
  10. Robertshaw's Farm Shop

    Halifax

    Robertshaw's Farm Shop

    Hello and welcome to Robertshaw’s Farm Shop! We are a family owned business based in Thornton, led by owner James Robertshaw. The Robertshaw...
    Hello and welcome to Robertshaw’s Farm Shop! We are a family owned business based in Thornton, led by owner James Robertshaw. The Robertshaw’s story begins in 1929, when James’s grandfather Harry opened his butchers’ shop in Halifax. James father Andrew Robertshaw would always be at the butchers shop helping his dad out and, in the mid 60’s, he began selling potatoes and vegetables at the side of the road (where our farm shop stands now). In 1974 Andrew Robertshaw opened The Farm shop as a standalone business. James was born and raised at The Farm Shop, working and helping customers from a young age. In 1987, a butchery was added to the shop, and the rest is history. We’re third generation farmers and butchers. The shop is situated on our working sheep farm and we produce our own prime lambs. We rear over 200 breeding ewes and produce just over 350 lambs a year. The lambs we raise on the farm are sold in the shop by our team of 30 butchers who have over 200 years of experience between them, meaning nothing goes to waste, and our customers benefit from fresh, quality meat. We also have great relationships with local farmers, and buy the best quality meat in Yorkshire auction marts. Owner James visits at least three auctions a week, often buying prize winning beasts. We are proactive in using renewable forms of energy available to us and minimising our impact on the environment. We have our own wind turbines on the farm, and a recycling scheme in place for every single item of waste from the farm. We bale cardboard and plastic for recycling and all our fruit and veg is fed back to the animals, meaning nothing goes into landfill. This years we’ll be looking into improving our packaging. Over the next couple of years we are planning to put in a café, extend our Animal Croft, bring more homemade products to our ranges, and lots more… We hope to see you in the shop soon. Opening Times: Shop Monday-Saturday 8am-8pm Sunday 9am-6pm Takeaway Monday-Saturday 7am-6pm Sunday 9am-6pm
  11. Wainhouse Tower, Halifax photo by Alastair Wallace

    Halifax

    Wainhouse Tower

    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The ...
    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The structure was never actually used as a working chimney and as such, is regarded by many as one of Britain's finest follies. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Wainhouse Tower was open to the public on the Bank Holidays, for those brave enough to tackle the 403 steps to the viewing gallery at the top, the stunning views make it well worth the climb. We hope that it will be possible to reopen the Tower to visitors in 2021 and will add any dates the Tower may be open to the public here when and if they are confirmed. A Brief History of Wainhouse Tower Born in 1817 John Edward Wainhouse inherited his Uncle’s Dyeworks on Washer Lane, Halifax in 1856. The Dyeworks were typical of the day, causing considerable pollution because of smoke emissions. Halifax was badly affected by smog. For weeks on end the smoke laden atmosphere blanketed the town, reducing sunlight and contaminating the landscape with soot and sulphur trioxide. This national problem caused the Government to introduce a Smoke Abatement Act. Wainhouse developed the idea of building a chimney 350 metres up the hillside from the Dyeworks, connected to it by an underground tunnel. Sir Henry Edwards, A wealthy neighbour of John Edward Wainhouse, made complaints about the smoke nuisance caused by the Dyeworks, leading to a feud between the two men. Mr Isaac Booth (who was also Sir Henry’s architect) was asked by Wainhouse to design and build the mill chimney. The design incorporated an internal staircase that led to four balcony features. This exacerbated the deepening feud between Wainhouse and Sir Henry. Sir Henry, an extrovert and boastful man, claimed that his private estate at Pye Nest could not be viewed from any house o the hills. Wainhouse said he would rectify this by putting an observatory at the top of his chimney. Work commenced in 1871. In 1873, as a result of the feuding; the architect Isaac Booth decided he could no longer work for either man. This led to the appointment of Richard Swarbrick Dugdale, who redesigned the upper section of the building. The new design incorporated a corbelled and balustrade balcony, surmounted by a lantern dome and finial. The building was completed on the 9th September 1875. It is estimated that over 9,000 tonnes of materials were used. The total cost is thought to be in the region of £15,000. However, by the time the building was completed, it was clear that it would never be used as a chimney. The Washer Lane Dyeworks had been sold in 1874 to the works manager Mr Henry Mossman. The sale did not include the Tower. It is thought that Mossman saw the then uncompleted building to be a liability. This point of view is difficult to understand given the fact that Mossman was then prosecuted under the Smoke Abatement Act. Mossman proved that considerable efforts were made to abate the smoke nuisance by pulling down six existing small chimneys …and erecting a large chimney in their place! John Edward Wainhouse died on 26th July 1883 at the age of 66. He as buried in the family grave at Holy Trinity Churchyard, Halifax. The gravestone is located against the boundary wall on the south side of the Church. The Tower and three acres of surrounding land was sold by auction in 1887. The Tower changed hands several times until coming under the ownership of the Halifax Corporation in 1919. During the Second World War the Tower was used by the military authorities as an observation post. As a result of the reorganisation of Local Government in 1974, Wainhouse Tower became the property of Calderdale Council. Today the Tower is used as a viewing platform; open to the public on Bank Holidays and other select days through the year
  12. Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum

    Halifax

    Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum

    Representing over 300 years of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, since its raising in 1702, this museum ...

    Representing over 300 years of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, since its raising in 1702, this museum tells the stories of the soldiers who served using their own words.

    The ‘Iron Duke’, Arthur Wellesley, was the Colonel of the 33rd which became, after his death, the only Regiment to be named after a person not of the Royal Blood.

    Displays include items relating to the Duke himself and to the rich and varied history of the regiment, including the campaigns of 33rd and 76th foot.

    The Duke of Wellington’s Regiment has a long association with the town of Halifax and its location within Bankfield Museum complements the wider history on display here.

    FREE Admission

  13. True North Restaurant - Interior

    Halifax

    True North Restaurant

    True North Restaurant offers an exciting range of Menus & Special Events in a relaxed and stylish setting. From leisurely Breakfasts to casual ...
    True North Restaurant offers an exciting range of Menus & Special Events in a relaxed and stylish setting. From leisurely Breakfasts to casual Lunches and exceptional Fine Dining, you can enjoy both a warm northern welcome and great food in the heart of historic Dean Clough. The restaurant is headed by multi-award winning and highly respected Executive Chef Mark York. Breakfast/Brunch: Monday-Friday 7.30am-11.30am, Saturday & Sunday 8.30am-11.30am Lunch: Daily from Midday until 3pm, Special Sunday Menu A La Carte: Friday & Saturday from 6pm Pre-Theatre Menu: Available before every Viaduct Theatre performance
  14. Holdsworth House Hotel & Restaurant, Halifax

    Halifax

    Holdsworth House Hotel and Restaurant

    Stay at one of West Yorkshire’s top hotels. Holdsworth House is a 17th Century Jacobean manor hou...

    Stay at one of West Yorkshire’s top hotels. Holdsworth House is a 17th Century Jacobean manor house located three miles North of Halifax, with an award-winning restaurant overlooking the garden and 36 bedrooms housed in the award-wining extension adjoining the house.

    The Restaurant's three adjoining, beautifully furnished rooms (The Stone Room, The Panelled Room and the Mullioned Room) overlook the gardens. Each offers a unique atmosphere, a lovely original fireplace and stone mullioned windows to the outside world.

    Our motto is fresh and local. We buy produce from Yorkshire suppliers and prepare all meals fresh. We want our food to speak for itself; great flavours, fresh ingredients all made with passion.

    Children are welcome at Holdsworth House. We have a special children’s menu available and a selection of rooms that can accommodate one extra bed or a cot/crib. There are also a number of interconnecting rooms for families with older children.

    We also have a ground floor Accessible Room.

    Holdsworth House has seen its share of celebrity guests over the last 50 years whilst in the caring hands of the Pearson family. Now the Jacobean manor is also becoming well known for its role as a TV set. In recent times the team has welcomed film crews from all over the UK, including the BAFTA-winning crew from Last Tango in Halifax, screened on the BBC. Holdsworth House was lucky to be featured in the final three episodes of series two, when Caroline and Kate escaped for a romantic break at ‘a luxury hotel’. The manor was also the setting for Celia’s hen party and for the series finale wedding of Alan and Celia.

    We are located less than a hundred metres from the route of The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route which circles the borough.

    Culture Break:

    Visit Yorkshire and discover a wealth of heritage, culture and TV film locations, all while staying at Holdsworth House. We are happy to advise on locations of attractions and how any entry tickets required can be obtained.

    • £30 each towards evening dinner

    • Overnight stay in a double room, based on two adults sharing

    • Full Yorkshire breakfast

    Visit our website for the lowest available rates or call 01422 240024

    Terms and conditions: The Culture Break includes a dinner allowance in the restaurant of £30 per person per night (food only, excludes beverages). A limited number of rooms may be allocated to the offer, once this allocation has been sold you may be offered an alternative rate. Package price is reduced from our standard tariff. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other discount, offer or promotion. All extras to be settled on departure.  Main picture courtesy of Kyte Photography. Standard booking terms and conditions apply.

     

  15. Hali-Facts Trail front page

    Halifax

    Hali-Facts Heritage Discovery Trail

    This Heritage Discovery Trail has been designed for children and families, but will be enjoyed by people of all...

    This Heritage Discovery Trail has been designed for children and families, but will be enjoyed by people of all ages. It will take you on a walking tour around Halifax town centre, asking you to use your detective skills of observation, thinking, note-taking and sketching as you go.

    You can complete the Discovery Trail in a way that suits you. It can be done in ‘bite-size’ chunks over several visits or if you are feeling brave and have a lot of energy, you can try it all in one go!

    Many of the tasks can be completed by looking at the outsides of the buildings but sometimes, you will be invited to pop indoors to have a search around. Please check the opening times for each building that allows this – details are on their websites which are listed throughout the booklet.

    As far as is reasonably practicable, each building on this Discovery Trail provides a standard of access for disabled people equal to that enjoyed by the rest of the public.

    You can download a PDF of the Hali-Facts Trail to follow on your device or to print off here.

  16. Creative Crystals

    Halifax

    Creative Crystals

    Creative Crystals began trading in The Piece Hall in 1993. Stocking a wide selection of gemstones, crystals, minerals and jewellery from around...
    Creative Crystals began trading in The Piece Hall in 1993. Stocking a wide selection of gemstones, crystals, minerals and jewellery from around the world, we also sell minerals in their natural state and also polished decorative items made from semi-precious gemstones, some of which are made into unique pieces of jewellery.

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