Plan your stay

Grid List

1-16 of 149

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. ...
  5. 10
  1. Newbank Garden Centre

    Greetland

    Newbank Garden Centre

    Forty years experience in the plant world have given us a great awareness of our customers' needs. We try to supply everything that the gardener c...
    Forty years experience in the plant world have given us a great awareness of our customers' needs. We try to supply everything that the gardener could need throughout the year and believe our prices are second to none. The Willow Tree Cafe serves stunning home cooked food and cakes 7 days a week, with outdoor table available. Beautiful food in beautiful surroundings.
  2. The Moorcock Inn

    Sowerby Bridge

    The Moorcock Inn

    The Moorcock Inn is at the foot of 250 acres of productive moorland, providing plenty of plants, berries, mushrooms and game. Our 2-acre plot is be...
    The Moorcock Inn is at the foot of 250 acres of productive moorland, providing plenty of plants, berries, mushrooms and game. Our 2-acre plot is being developed to provide an organic kitchen garden, providing the foundations of our pub & restaurant menus- with the best of Yorkshire produce supplying the rest. Both the pub and restaurant menus are written with the seasons and cooked over fire. ​Our wine list focuses on natural wines from small producers. We offer a continually changing selection by the glass and carafe- featuring both classic and more quirky styles. Alongside our draught beers, we also have a local and world bottled selection, particularly featuring traditional Belgian styles- some of which are rare, vintage and aged. The Pub Is a cosy, traditional freehouse, with oak beams and wood-burning stoves. It offers a menu of seasonal plates cooked over charcoal, along with house-made charcuterie and aged cheeses- accompanied by great drinks. It's the perfect place to stop by for a quick pint and a snack, or to settle in by the fire for dinner and wine. In addition to our wine and beer selections, there is a spirits list based on Yorkshire distilleries, and a seasonal cocktail list. Our pub menu can also be enjoyed outdoors, with blankets and warming fires, and a view of the sunset over the Ryburn Valley. The Calderdale Way walking route passes by us, just over 200 metres away, The restaurant offers a daily set menu consisting of multiple courses, served in a relaxed, farmhouse-like atmosphere. Some courses are served as individual plates, at other times, several dishes are served together. While the pub menu focuses on tasty snacks and small plates that are great to have alongside drinks, the restaurant menu highlights traditional homesteading techniques, cooking over fire, preservation techniques and the sourcing of local, seasonal and wild ingredients. It's the place where we strictly use the produce around us and the ingredients we are most proud of.
  3. Cherry Tree Farm

    Halifax

    Cherry Tree Farm

    Cherry Tree Farm is a quiet, family friendly site with fabulous views only two minutes away from the local village. We are situated 5 minutes fr...
    Cherry Tree Farm is a quiet, family friendly site with fabulous views only two minutes away from the local village. We are situated 5 minutes from Junction 24 of the M62 motorway. Our village (2mins away) has butchers, bakers, takeaways, launderette, calor gas, etc. There is free fishing nearby (trout)and many beautiful walks. There are good quality pubs and restaurants locally and we have a bus stop at the farm entrance with buses direct to Huddersfield and Halifax. Touring & Camping: 20 pitches, 40 bedspaces
  4. Hebden Bridge Little Theatre

    Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge Little Theatre

    Our 120 seat auditorium gives the theatre a wonderfully intimate atmosphere and the Waterside Bar and patio area help to make a visit to The Little...
    Our 120 seat auditorium gives the theatre a wonderfully intimate atmosphere and the Waterside Bar and patio area help to make a visit to The Little Theatre a thoroughly enjoyable experience. The Art Deco styled bar is open before, during and after the performance for the benefit of theatre patrons. Tea, coffee and drinks are available and bar drinks can be preordered. In good weather, drinks can be enjoyed on the canal-side patio. We can accommodate wheelchair users. Please let us know your requirements when you book so that we can ensure you have an enjoyable visit to our theatre.
  5. Dock Pudding

    Mytholmroyd

    Dock Pudding

    Dock Pudding is a dish that, as far as we know, is only found here in Calderdale. It's made from dock leaves (from a sweet variety called Polygo...

    Dock Pudding is a dish that, as far as we know, is only found here in Calderdale. It's made from dock leaves (from a sweet variety called Polygonum Bistorta or more recently Persicaria Bistorta not the more common cow dock leaves), nettles, oatmeal, onions, butter and seasoning. Resembling spinach, the pudding is fried together with bacon and eggs and served as part of a traditional English breakfast.

    See below for a traditional and alternate Dock Pudding recipe!

  6. Innovation at Hebden Bridge Mill

    Hebden Bridge

    Innovation at Hebden Bridge Mill

    Welcome to Hebden Bridge mill, a building which has stood at the centre of this town, even before there was a town! The Mill is home to Innovation ...
    Welcome to Hebden Bridge mill, a building which has stood at the centre of this town, even before there was a town! The Mill is home to Innovation Shop & Cafe-Bar. We invite you to visit us, to enjoy the wonderful ambience of this historic building. This principle of environmental sustainability characterises our entire business, with a wide range ethically sourced goods available in our shop, wholesome locally sourced food in the café and all our energy generated on site from fully renewable sources.
  7. Fleur & Flora Boutique

    Hebden Bridge

    Fleur & Flora Boutique

    Fleur and Flora is a boutique situated on Market Street, Hebden Bridge that offers a range of ladieswear and homeware. It is a modern and chic shop...
    Fleur and Flora is a boutique situated on Market Street, Hebden Bridge that offers a range of ladieswear and homeware. It is a modern and chic shop, without the hefty price tag.
  8. The Alma Inn

    Sowerby Bridge

    The Alma Inn

    The Alma Inn has five en-suite guest bedrooms which have been refurbished to a high standard and offer sweeping views across the Ryburn Valley. Our...
    The Alma Inn has five en-suite guest bedrooms which have been refurbished to a high standard and offer sweeping views across the Ryburn Valley. Our idyllic location is the perfect base from which to explore the local area, with The Calderdale Way walking route offering 50 miles of footpaths and bridleways across the unspoilt West Yorkshire countryside. The rooms are split into 3 doubles with comfortable king-size beds, 1 twin with 2 single beds, and 1 family room, which features a double bed as well as a quirky and semi-private cabin-style single bed, perfect for families.. All rooms are equipped with tea and coffee making facilities and colour TV. Cots can be supplied on request.
  9. The White Lion, Heptonstall

    Heptonstall

    The White Lion, Heptonstall

    The White Lion is a traditional pub, without television, juke box, gaming machines or WiFi. We serve real ales, real ciders and have a vast coll...
    The White Lion is a traditional pub, without television, juke box, gaming machines or WiFi. We serve real ales, real ciders and have a vast collection of Gin and Whisky, along with great home made food including many vegetarian and vegan dishes. The Calderdale Way walking route passes through Heptonstall, right past the pub. The oldest part of the building is at the rear of the present layout and dates back to the early 14th Century, at which time it faced the opposite way onto the Pack Horse route from Hebden Bridge to Nelson and Burnley. This ran along the rear of the present building. In the early 15th Century the new road was constructed and the old building was extended and the present frontage constructed facing the new road. Many of the buildings along Towngate and Smithwell Lane were constructed around this time, including the Cloth Hall, which was originally a single story building. The pub was frequented by the Cragg Coiners during the late 16th Century. We have a display of dies and coins in our dining room, which is certainly worth a visit.
  10. Smithy House

    Halifax

    Smithy House

    A small campsite that accepts just five caravans or motorhomes - ideal for getting away from it all. Camping & Caravanning Club members only.
    A small campsite that accepts just five caravans or motorhomes - ideal for getting away from it all. Camping & Caravanning Club members only.
  11. Wainhouse Tower, Halifax photo by Alastair Wallace

    Halifax

    Wainhouse Tower

    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The ...
    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The structure was never actually used as a working chimney and as such, is regarded by many as one of Britain's finest follies. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Wainhouse Tower was open to the public on the Bank Holidays, for those brave enough to tackle the 403 steps to the viewing gallery at the top, the stunning views make it well worth the climb. We hope that it will be possible to reopen the Tower to visitors in 2021 and will add any dates the Tower may be open to the public here when and if they are confirmed. A Brief History of Wainhouse Tower Born in 1817 John Edward Wainhouse inherited his Uncle’s Dyeworks on Washer Lane, Halifax in 1856. The Dyeworks were typical of the day, causing considerable pollution because of smoke emissions. Halifax was badly affected by smog. For weeks on end the smoke laden atmosphere blanketed the town, reducing sunlight and contaminating the landscape with soot and sulphur trioxide. This national problem caused the Government to introduce a Smoke Abatement Act. Wainhouse developed the idea of building a chimney 350 metres up the hillside from the Dyeworks, connected to it by an underground tunnel. Sir Henry Edwards, A wealthy neighbour of John Edward Wainhouse, made complaints about the smoke nuisance caused by the Dyeworks, leading to a feud between the two men. Mr Isaac Booth (who was also Sir Henry’s architect) was asked by Wainhouse to design and build the mill chimney. The design incorporated an internal staircase that led to four balcony features. This exacerbated the deepening feud between Wainhouse and Sir Henry. Sir Henry, an extrovert and boastful man, claimed that his private estate at Pye Nest could not be viewed from any house o the hills. Wainhouse said he would rectify this by putting an observatory at the top of his chimney. Work commenced in 1871. In 1873, as a result of the feuding; the architect Isaac Booth decided he could no longer work for either man. This led to the appointment of Richard Swarbrick Dugdale, who redesigned the upper section of the building. The new design incorporated a corbelled and balustrade balcony, surmounted by a lantern dome and finial. The building was completed on the 9th September 1875. It is estimated that over 9,000 tonnes of materials were used. The total cost is thought to be in the region of £15,000. However, by the time the building was completed, it was clear that it would never be used as a chimney. The Washer Lane Dyeworks had been sold in 1874 to the works manager Mr Henry Mossman. The sale did not include the Tower. It is thought that Mossman saw the then uncompleted building to be a liability. This point of view is difficult to understand given the fact that Mossman was then prosecuted under the Smoke Abatement Act. Mossman proved that considerable efforts were made to abate the smoke nuisance by pulling down six existing small chimneys …and erecting a large chimney in their place! John Edward Wainhouse died on 26th July 1883 at the age of 66. He as buried in the family grave at Holy Trinity Churchyard, Halifax. The gravestone is located against the boundary wall on the south side of the Church. The Tower and three acres of surrounding land was sold by auction in 1887. The Tower changed hands several times until coming under the ownership of the Halifax Corporation in 1919. During the Second World War the Tower was used by the military authorities as an observation post. As a result of the reorganisation of Local Government in 1974, Wainhouse Tower became the property of Calderdale Council. Today the Tower is used as a viewing platform; open to the public on Bank Holidays and other select days through the year
  12. IOU Theatre

    Halifax

    IOU Theatre

    IOU is a producing organisation with nearly 40 years’ experience making live shows and contemporary art installations that combine many art forms t...
    IOU is a producing organisation with nearly 40 years’ experience making live shows and contemporary art installations that combine many art forms together with new and innovative technology. All aspects of the work are originated by the company and devised for unusual indoor and outdoor locations as well as established touring venues and galleries. IOU’s work is created by teams drawn from an international pool of professional artists, makers, performers, poets, musicians and technicians who have a range of experience working with the company - from founder members, new collaborators to recent graduates. We support the development of independent artists’ creative practice and offer opportunities to emerging artists (regionally and nationally) across a range of disciplines to develop their ideas, creative and professional skills. We also deliver a learning and participation programme to the local community, schools and families.
  13. Halifax Borough Market

    Halifax

    Halifax Borough Market

    This splendid Grade II* listed Victorian market hall was voted the best in Britain in 2008. Come and enjoy the hustle, bustle and traditional splen...
    This splendid Grade II* listed Victorian market hall was voted the best in Britain in 2008. Come and enjoy the hustle, bustle and traditional splendour of a thriving retail market with a warm and friendly atmosphere. The impressive and historic Halifax Borough Market was built between 1891 and 1896 and was officially opened by the Duke and Duchess of York (later King George V and Queen Mary). As a first time visitor to this award-winning market, you could be forgiven for thinking that you had stumbled on to the set of a period TV drama. Decor and atmosphere combine to create a shopping experience that just can't be matched by mundane and soulless out-of-town supermarkets. Alongside the outstanding traditional family butchers and fruit and vegetable stalls which have passed down through generations, are the new stall holders tempting our taste buds with a bounty of exotic produce from the continent. Nor will the markets's fishmongers disappoint. You can treat your inner child with toffees, fudge, boiled sweets, cakes and brandy snaps. Sandwiches, pies, olives and chorizo can be found alongside haberdashers, vibrant flower shops, perfumers, leather goods, books, underwear, CDs, DVDs, hardware, fancy dress and more! With several cafes and coffee shops where you can stop for cuppa and a butty (go on, have cake too) you can easily refuel to carry on shopping. From the exotic to the native, extravagant to inexpensive, the quality of produce on offer remains unsurpassed. The traditional splendour of Halifax Borough Market offers a real destination shopping experience. Open Monday to Saturday 9am - 5pm.
  14. The Workshop, Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge

    The Workshop

    The Workshop offers a wide variety of jewellery making classes and courses in the heart of beautiful Hebden Bridge, suitable for everyone from abso...
    The Workshop offers a wide variety of jewellery making classes and courses in the heart of beautiful Hebden Bridge, suitable for everyone from absolute beginners to those who already have some jewellery making experience. All our classes and courses are run by our expert professional jeweller Robert Dutson, who can guide you step by step through making your own beautiful jewellery. The classes we offer range from short 3 hour courses in which you can make a silver ring, silver necklace or bangle, to 6 week jewellery making courses and even a full day class in which couples can make their own wedding rings. For more class details and current timetables, please visit our website or contact us directly via email at info@theworkshophebden.co.uk
  15. Hebden Bridge Holiday Cottages

    Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge Holiday Cottages

    Hebden Bridge Holiday Cottages offer two fabulous self catering cottages for you to enjoy a happy holiday or fun filled relaxing short break. O...
    Hebden Bridge Holiday Cottages offer two fabulous self catering cottages for you to enjoy a happy holiday or fun filled relaxing short break. Original features include stone mullion windows, stone window sills and large wooden beams in both cottages. We have kept these original features but have brought both cottages into the 21st century with free wireless broadband connectivity, Smart TVs - 32in flat-screens with Freeview, USB port and blue tooth sound bar. For your health and pleasure we have installed a Far Infra Red Sauna in White Rose Cottage and a Hot Tub at Red Rose Cottage. The Calderdale Way passes right by our cottages, making them a great base from which to explore this 50 mile walking route. We have an Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Point: 1 x 7kW 32A Type 2 Mennekes, ZeroNet.
  16. Cat i' th' Well

    Halifax

    Cat i' th' Well

    A fabulous country pub in a wonderful location with fine views, just a few hundred metres away from The Calderdale Way walking route. Enjoy an ...
    A fabulous country pub in a wonderful location with fine views, just a few hundred metres away from The Calderdale Way walking route. Enjoy an open fire, comfortable seating , friendly people, great beer and really good food. Legend says that the white rock behind this pub was a hiding place for Robin Hood's loot and that the rock must be painted annually, or the pub will fail. One landlord, who painted it pink, went out of business the following year!

Grid List

1-16 of 149

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. ...
  5. 10

Sign up to be the first to hear all about the latest news and events

Trigger popup