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  1. Gibson Mill, Hardcastle Crags

    Hebden Bridge

    Hardcastle Crags & Gibson Mill

    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the...
    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the country. Gibson Mill is situated within Hardcastle Crags woodland beside Hebden Water. The National Trust have put in some superb waymarked walking routes suitable for all abilities. Cross the river on stepping stones and spot birds, insects, amphibians and if you're lucky; deer! You'll find Hardcastle Crags offers a completely different experience throughout the year - from the icicles of midwinter to the carpet of bluebells in the spring. The early 19th century Gibson Mill is situated within the site. A tour of the mill tells the history of the valley and the mill over the past 200 years. The mill also has changing exhibitions throughout the year. Gibson Mill is 100% self-sufficient in energy, water and waste treatment. It has a hydro-electric system, solar photovoltaic panels and a log-burning stove fuelled by wood from the estate. You can also rest and recharge at the Weaving Shed Café, serving delicious ethical and locally-produced food and buy the perfect gift or memento in the shop located there. Built in around 1800,Gibson Mill was one of the first mills of the Industrial Revolution. The mill was driven by a water wheel and produced cotton cloth up until 1890. In the early 1900s, Gibson Mill began to be used as an ‘entertainment emporium’ for the local people. After the Second World War, the mill slipped into disuse, and was acquired by the National Trust in 1950. Hardcastle Crags is open all year round from dawn until dusk, admission to Hardcastle Crags and Gibson Mill are FREE. Dogs are welcome (including in the café and mill) if kept under close control. GETTING THERE You have three options to get to Hardcastle Crags: By car - there is parking at Midgehole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AA) and Clough Hole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AZ). A parking fee applies at both car parks, although parking is free for National Trust members By bus – the 906 runs from Hebden Bridge on weekends between May and October. It will take you to both the bottom and the top of the valley. Walking – there is a route from Hebden Bridge on good paths with a bit of road walking. It will take you about 45 minutes. Pick up a guide from Hebden Bridge Visitor Centre. See below for details of the wildlife you can discover at Hardcastle Crags.
  2. Todmorden Town Hall

    Todmorden

    Todmorden Town Hall

    Todmorden Town Hall is a fantastic Grade 1 listed building. Visit take a tour, attend an open day or hire the space and be amazed by the architect...
    Todmorden Town Hall is a fantastic Grade 1 listed building. Visit take a tour, attend an open day or hire the space and be amazed by the architecture. The Grade 1 listed building is home to: • An impressive ballroom • Magistrate’s Court, now Todmorden Town Council Chamber • Grand staircase • Heritage Centre For a look inside please follow the hyperlink to the GillGraphics website below.
  3. Dies used By the Cragg Vale Coiners

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Coiners

    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's a...
    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's activities were said to be so damaging that they threatened to wreck Britain's currency. David Hartley learnt his trade as an ironworker in Birmingham, before getting into trouble and moving back to Mytholmroyd to escape the authorities. Once returned to his home at Bell House farmhouse (which is now a bed & breakfast accommodation with educational facilities) David used ironworking as a cover to clip or file the edges from gold coins, milling the edges back so the change was all but unnoticeable, and making counterfeit coins from the shavings whilst returning the clipped coins into circulation. David’s activities soon spread to other farms, with families at nearby Hill Top Farm and Keelham Farm soon becoming involved; forming the beginnings of the gang of Cragg Vale Coiners. Local publicans also helped by placing the counterfeit coins into circulation. David Hartley seems to have been an enigmatic leader, becoming known as 'King David' Hartley and the gang’s numbers grew considerably until well over 30 individuals were involved. Rumours of the gang's activities reached the authorities, who sent an excise man named William Deighton to investigate. One of the coiners turned King’s Evidence and betrayed the gang, leading to Hartley's arrest at an Inn in Halifax on 14th October 1769. Hartley's brother Isaac offered £100 to anybody who would kill Deighton. It is alleged that the plotters planned Deighton's murder at an Inn in Mytholmroyd called Barbary's, which is now gone, but was located on the opposite side of the road to the present day Dusty Miller. On November 10th 1769 at Bull Close Lane near Halifax, Deighton was approached by two men, Matthew Normanton and Robert Thomas. Deighton was shot dead, his body also showing signs of having been stamped on. Just days later, the Government offered a reward of £100 for information leading to the arrest of the murderers and a pardon for anybody, bar the killers, who would turn King's Evidence. Over 30 people were subsequently arrested, including 'King David' Hartley, who was sentenced to death on April 6th 1770 and hanged at Tynburn, near York, on April 28th. His body is buried in the graveyard of the village of Heptonstall, above Hebden Bridge. Robert Thomas was acquitted of Deighton's murder, but was later hanged in 1774 for being a highwayman. Matthew Normanton initially fled the authorities, but was later caught and hanged in 1775. Isaac Hartley was never brought to trial due to a lack of evidence and died in 1815, aged 78. Heptonstall Museum has on display some of the original dies used by the Coiners to stamp their gold discs into coins, as well as panels telling more of their story.
  4. Halifax Playhouse

    Halifax

    Halifax Playhouse

    Halifax Playhouse, the home of Halifax Thespians, and one of West Yorkshire's leading venues for live theatre. It's often said that you never kn...
    Halifax Playhouse, the home of Halifax Thespians, and one of West Yorkshire's leading venues for live theatre. It's often said that you never know what to expect when you step through the doors of Halifax Playhouse. As the home of Halifax Thespians, the Playhouse can surprise, delight, amuse and entertain, and that's before the interval. The enthusiasm of the actors, singers, dancers and musicians who perform at the Playhouse really does shine through, giving you a first class night out (or a matinee) every time. Relax in the cosy and welcoming surroundings of the Playhouse Bar. It is open from 7pm (6.45pm on Saturdays) to 11pm when there is a show on. You can order your interval drinks before the show to avoid queuing later. The Playhouse coffee lounge opens in the interval of most shows, serving fairtrade coffee or tea. At other times coffee is available from the bar.
  5. Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum

    Halifax

    Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum

    Representing over 300 years of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, since its raising in 1702, this museum tells the stories of the soldiers who serv...
    Representing over 300 years of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, since its raising in 1702, this museum tells the stories of the soldiers who served using their own words. The ‘Iron Duke’, Arthur Wellesley, was the Colonel of the 33rd which became, after his death, the only Regiment to be named after a person not of the Royal Blood. Displays include items relating to the Duke himself and to the rich and varied history of the regiment, including the campaigns of 33rd and 76th foot. The Duke of Wellington’s Regiment has a long association with the town of Halifax and its location within Bankfield Museum complements the wider history on display here. FREE Admission
  6. Shibden Hall & Estate

    Halifax

    Shibden Hall & Estate

    Shibden Hall is open 2nd March - 27th October 2019.

    Monday to Thursday 10am - 5pm and Saturday & Sund...

    Shibden Hall is open 2nd March - 27th October 2019.

    Monday to Thursday 10am - 5pm and Saturday & Sunday 11am - 5pm.

    NB The Hall is closed on Fridays.

    Welcome to the valley of the sheep - schep dene - the home of the Lister family for over 300 years. Shibden Hall was the home of the noted 19th century diarist Anne Lister (1791 - 1840). The Hall, dating originally from circa 1420, is a distinctive half-timbered building furnished in the styles of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, adapted and extended throughout the centuries by the families who lived here.

    Anne Lister is the focus of the new BBC drama series 'Gentleman Jack' written and directed by Sally Wainwright for Lookout Point Productions. The series will explore Anne's life and those who lived in the Hall and Estate. The series is currently being filmed will be aired on BBC and HBO in 2019. Suranne Jones plays the role of Anne Lister and Shibden Hall is being used as a filming location. 

    Shibden Hall is set in a 32 hectares of informal park and woodland, which have won the Green Heritage Award. Explore the beautifully restored historic grounds which offer cascades, pools, tunnels, terraced and fruit gardens and "Paisley Shawl" inspired Victorian bedding designs by Joshua Major.

    Enjoy the boating lake, ride on the miniature railway, play on the pitch and putt course or the new children's play area -suitable for all abilities. The grounds also offer footpaths, an orienteering course and a permanent dry stone walling exhibition - a fine example of this fascinating craft.

    Hidden within the depths of Shibden Park is a small wooded area known as Cunnery Wood. This Local Nature Reserve is on the footprint of Anne Lister's kitchen garden, fish pond, top up of the cascade and rabbit warren (hence the name Cunnery from Coney-rabbit). The area is rich in wildlife from stunning displays of bluebells under English oak, elm and birch to a multitude of songs from birds, healthy butterfly and moth populations and numerous small mammals throughout.

    The Shibden Mereside Cafe and visitor centre is the perfect place to relax on your visit, with displays and information about the history of Shibden Estate, its habitat, landscape and environment. Function rooms are also available for you to hold your conferences, meetings and events in style. Shibden Estate also hosts live entertainment, music, walks, guided tours, storytelling and craft events in the park.

    Craft fairs, exhibitions, workshops and working demonstrations take place regularly throughout the year.

    Click here to Watch a short video, 'Shibden: 500 Years of History.'and click here to watch a second short video about 'The Anne Lister Story', with Helena Whitbread (you can see the video in full at Shibden hall).

    There are frequent buses every 15 minutes or better from Monday to Saturday passing Shibden Hall, between Halifax and Bradford, Halifax and Todmorden/Burnley and Halifax and Brighouse. with other regular and less frequent services throughout the week. Up to date timetables are available from West Yorkshire METRO.

    Make your trip to Shibden Hall into a stay to remember at the award-winning Four Star Holdsworth House Hotel and Restaurant.

  7. Hali-Facts Trail front page

    Halifax

    Hali-Facts Heritage Discovery Trail

    This Heritage Discovery Trail has been designed for children and families, but will be enjoyed by people of all ages. It will take you on a walking...
    This Heritage Discovery Trail has been designed for children and families, but will be enjoyed by people of all ages. It will take you on a walking tour around Halifax town centre, asking you to use your detective skills of observation, thinking, note-taking and sketching as you go. You can complete the Discovery Trail in a way that suits you. It can be done in ‘bite-size’ chunks over several visits or if you are feeling brave and have a lot of energy, you can try it all in one go! Many of the tasks can be completed by looking at the outsides of the buildings but sometimes, you will be invited to pop indoors to have a search around. Please check the opening times for each building that allows this – details are on their websites which are listed throughout the booklet. As far as is reasonably practicable, each building on this Discovery Trail provides a standard of access for disabled people equal to that enjoyed by the rest of the public.
  8. IOU Theatre

    Halifax

    IOU Theatre

    IOU is a producing organisation with nearly 40 years’ experience making live shows and contemporary art installations that combine many art forms t...
    IOU is a producing organisation with nearly 40 years’ experience making live shows and contemporary art installations that combine many art forms together with new and innovative technology. All aspects of the work are originated by the company and devised for unusual indoor and outdoor locations as well as established touring venues and galleries. IOU’s work is created by teams drawn from an international pool of professional artists, makers, performers, poets, musicians and technicians who have a range of experience working with the company - from founder members, new collaborators to recent graduates. We support the development of independent artists’ creative practice and offer opportunities to emerging artists (regionally and nationally) across a range of disciplines to develop their ideas, creative and professional skills. We also deliver a learning and participation programme to the local community, schools and families.
  9. Bankfield Museum, Halifax

    Halifax

    Bankfield Museum

    A Museum since 1887, Bankfield tells the story of Halifax and Calderdale, using its rich and diverse collections. Set in the attractive surround...
    A Museum since 1887, Bankfield tells the story of Halifax and Calderdale, using its rich and diverse collections. Set in the attractive surroundings of Akroyd Park, at the centre of Akroydon model village conservation area, this Victorian mansion was the home of local mill owner, philanthropist and MP, Colonel Edward Akroyd. We are a short distance from the centre of Halifax, with free parking and close to public transport links. Bankfield’s exhibitions cover local history, costume, art, toys, military history, jewellery and textiles from around the world. Our collections contain objects from Ancient Egypt through to the 21st Century as we continue to collect and preserve items for future generations.
  10. The Birchcliffe Centre

    Hebden Bridge

    The Birchcliffe Centre

    The Birchcliffe Centre is owned by the charity Pennine Heritage, created as a result of efforts to save the magnificent Birchcliffe Baptist Chapel,...
    The Birchcliffe Centre is owned by the charity Pennine Heritage, created as a result of efforts to save the magnificent Birchcliffe Baptist Chapel, which now houses the Centre. The Birchcliffe Centre is now an expansive conference, exhibition and events venue. home to the Pennine Horizons Digital Archive, the Hebden Bridge Local History Society, the After Alice Project, and a number of valued tenants. The auditorium, mezzanine and yoga studio are all available for hire. All monies received go towards furthering the charitable aims of Pennine Heritage.
  11. Heptonstall Museum

    Heptonstall

    Heptonstall Museum

    Heptonstall Museum offers you the opportunity to expore the changing importance of Heptonstall and the surrounding area, from prehistoric times unt...
    Heptonstall Museum offers you the opportunity to expore the changing importance of Heptonstall and the surrounding area, from prehistoric times until recent day. Find out about the infamous Cragg Vale Coiners, who produced counterfeit currency and committed murder to conceal their illegal trade. Explore the temporary exhibition relating to local stories, objects and heroes. Discover the exploits of Heptonstall's Parliamentarian garrison during the English Civil War and uncover intriguing stories of the everyday lives of the people of Heptonstall and the Upper Calder Valley. Heptonstall Grammar School was established in 1642, the present building was rebuilt in 1771, where it continued to be used as a school until 1889. In 1898 it became the Yorkshire Penny Bank whose staff were careful to preserve some of the original features of the school: including a black oak desk at which pupils took their lessons which can still be found inside the Museum today. FREE Entry. Open March to October: Saturdays, Sundays and Bank Holidays 11:00 - 16:00. Closed November to February.
  12. Stoodley Pike Monument

    Todmorden

    Stoodley Pike Monument

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The...

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The monument was designed in 1854 by local architect James Green, and completed in 1856 at the end of the Crimean War.

    The monument replaced an earlier structure, commemorating the defeat of Napoleon and the surrender of Paris. It was completed in 1815, after the Battle of Waterloo, but collapsed in 1854 after decades of weathering and a lightning strike.

    You can only reach the Pike on foot, as there is no vehicular or bicycle access to the monument. Stoodley Pike is accessible by well-defined Right of Way footpaths. The Pennine Way also passes Stoodley Pike. There are many walking routes to the Pike from Todmorden, Hebden Bridge and Mytholmroyd. Walking guides to all these routes available from local Visitor Centres and the Heart of the Pennines online shop.

    Stoodley Pike Monument contains a spiral staircase of 39 steps, accessed from its north side. If you visit, please be aware that several of the internal steps are in darkness, so it’s useful to have a torch to light your way, as there are no windows. The entrance to the balcony is on the Monument’s west face, some 40 feet above ground level. The views are well worth the walk and the climb!

  13. The Pennine Way

    Todmorden

    The Pennine Way

    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of England and offers 268 miles of the ...
    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of England and offers 268 miles of the finest upland walking in England. A once in a lifetime experience. The Pennine Way enters Calderdale at Blackstone Edge, passing Stoodley Pike, dropping down into the valley at Callis, climbing back up to Colden and over the moors to Widdop. Walkers often say this stretch of over 20 miles is one of the best on the whole route. The Trail is very well way-marked and there are some great views from the route (especially from the iconic Stoodley Pike). If you want to detour into Hebden Bridge on your way, you can use the Hebden Bridge Loop path developed in 2015.
  14. Hebden Bridge Town Hall

    Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge Town Hall

    The Town Hall, Hebden Bridge is at the centre of local civic and community life in our Pennine Yorkshire town. We are one of the first towns in Bri...
    The Town Hall, Hebden Bridge is at the centre of local civic and community life in our Pennine Yorkshire town. We are one of the first towns in Britain where the Town Hall is community-owned and managed. Hebden Bridge Community Association Ltd, a member-controlled charitable trust, took over the building from Calderdale Council in April 2010.
  15. Hebden Bridge Little Theatre

    Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge Little Theatre

    Our 120 seat auditorium gives the theatre a wonderfully intimate atmosphere and the Waterside Bar and patio area help to make a visit to The Little...
    Our 120 seat auditorium gives the theatre a wonderfully intimate atmosphere and the Waterside Bar and patio area help to make a visit to The Little Theatre a thoroughly enjoyable experience. The Art Deco styled bar is open before, during and after the performance for the benefit of theatre patrons. Tea, coffee and drinks are available and bar drinks can be preordered. In good weather, drinks can be enjoyed on the canal-side patio. We can accommodate wheelchair users. Please let us know your requirements when you book so that we can ensure you have an enjoyable visit to our theatre.
  16. Halifax Central Library & Archive

    Halifax

    Halifax Central Library & Archive

    Located on the Square Church site next to the Piece Hall, the new Halifax Central Library & Archive blends with the remains of the church into an i...
    Located on the Square Church site next to the Piece Hall, the new Halifax Central Library & Archive blends with the remains of the church into an iconic external design and striking internal layout. Steps lead up to the Library and to the new fourth gateway of the Piece Hall and access is also be available via a lift, taking people from Square Road to the Library and Archive entrance. The building has an internal lift to all floors. As well as the Piece Hall, the new Library and Archive will also have Square Chapel and the Industrial Museum as neighbours – all combining to create a highly interesting and welcoming destination for residents and visitors. Central Library and Archives services are available six days a week: Monday 9.30am to 6.30pm Tuesday 9.30am to 6.30pm Wednesday 9.30am to 12.30pm Thursday 9.30am to 6.30pm Friday 9.30am to 6.30pm Saturday 9.30am to 4.00pm Sunday CLOSED

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