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  1. Wainhouse Tower, Halifax

    Halifax

    Wainhouse Tower

    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The ...
    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The structure was never actually used as a working chimney and as such, is regarded by many as one of Britain's finest follies. The Tower is open to the public on Bank Holidays (please see below for the 2018 dates) and is available for Private Ascents. For those brave enough to tackle the 403 steps to the viewing gallery at the top, the stunning views make it well worth the climb. Click on the hyperlink below for video photo take using a drone of the awesome views from the top of the tower! The tower is open on bank holidays, between 11am to 4pm (last ascent 3.30pm) on the following dates: Easter Monday April 22nd May Day Monday May 6th Spring Bank Monday May 27th August Bank Monday August 26th Adult £3 Children & Adult Passport to Leisure Holders (PPL) £2.50 Child PPL £2 Family ticket ( 2 Adult & 2 Children ) £10 Private ascent for 1.5 hrs Maximum 50 people £150 (£125 + vat) for a week day viewing £210 (£175+vat) for a Saturday viewing £300 (£250 + vat) for a Sunday viewing
  2. Lister Lane Cemetery

    Halifax

    Lister Lane Cemetery

    The Halifax General Cemetery, Lister Lane, was opened in 1841. Today, the Cemetery has Grade II listed status and has many interesting monuments, p...
    The Halifax General Cemetery, Lister Lane, was opened in 1841. Today, the Cemetery has Grade II listed status and has many interesting monuments, particularly the gothic spires and obelisks along the main pathway. The Cemetery has been recognised as a Significant Cemetery in Europe, one of only 13 in the UK, putting it alongside such famous cemeteries as Highgate in London. Lister Lane Cemetery covers three acres of land, laid out around a now derelict neo-classical chapel and a raised terrace with views across Halifax to Beacon Hill. The Cemetery is open to the public on Wednesdays from 10am - 3.30pm and most Sundays (weather permitting) from 10am - 12pm when the Friends of the Cemetery are working there.
  3. Shibden Hall & Estate

    Halifax

    Shibden Hall & Estate

    Shibden Hall is open until 24th December 2019. Monday to Thursday 10am - 5pm and Saturday & Sunday 11am - 5pm....

    Shibden Hall is open until 24th December 2019. Monday to Thursday 10am - 5pm and Saturday & Sunday 11am - 5pm.

    PLEASE NOTE: Shibden Hall will be closed from the 7th to the 15th November 2019 for essential building works. There will also be reduced access to some rooms on Tuesday 5th and Wednesday 6th November.

    Welcome to the valley of the sheep - schep dene - the home of the Lister family for over 300 years. Shibden Hall was the home of the noted 19th century diarist Anne Lister (1791 - 1840). The Hall, dating originally from circa 1420, is a distinctive half-timbered building furnished in the styles of the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, adapted and extended throughout the centuries by the families who lived here.

    Anne Lister is the focus of the new BBC drama series 'Gentleman Jack' written and directed by Sally Wainwright for Lookout Point Productions. The series will explore Anne's life and those who lived in the Hall and Estate. The series is currently being filmed will be aired on BBC and HBO in 2019. Suranne Jones plays the role of Anne Lister and Shibden Hall is being used as a filming location. 

    Shibden Hall is set in a 32 hectares of informal park and woodland, which have won the Green Heritage Award. Explore the beautifully restored historic grounds which offer cascades, pools, tunnels, terraced and fruit gardens and "Paisley Shawl" inspired Victorian bedding designs by Joshua Major.

    Enjoy the boating lake, ride on the miniature railway, play on the pitch and putt course or the new children's play area -suitable for all abilities. The grounds also offer footpaths, an orienteering course and a permanent dry stone walling exhibition - a fine example of this fascinating craft.

    Hidden within the depths of Shibden Park is a small wooded area known as Cunnery Wood. This Local Nature Reserve is on the footprint of Anne Lister's kitchen garden, fish pond, top up of the cascade and rabbit warren (hence the name Cunnery from Coney-rabbit). The area is rich in wildlife from stunning displays of bluebells under English oak, elm and birch to a multitude of songs from birds, healthy butterfly and moth populations and numerous small mammals throughout.

    The Shibden Mereside Cafe and visitor centre is the perfect place to relax on your visit, with displays and information about the history of Shibden Estate, its habitat, landscape and environment. Function rooms are also available for you to hold your conferences, meetings and events in style. Shibden Estate also hosts live entertainment, music, walks, guided tours, storytelling and craft events in the park.

    Craft fairs, exhibitions, workshops and working demonstrations take place regularly throughout the year.

    Click here to Watch a short video, 'Shibden: 500 Years of History.'and click here to watch a second short video about 'The Anne Lister Story', with Helena Whitbread (you can see the video in full at Shibden hall).

    There are frequent buses every 15 minutes or better from Monday to Saturday passing Shibden Hall, between Halifax and Bradford, Halifax and Todmorden/Burnley and Halifax and Brighouse. with other regular and less frequent services throughout the week. Up to date timetables are available from West Yorkshire METRO.

    Make your trip to Shibden Hall into a stay to remember at the award-winning Four Star Holdsworth House Hotel and Restaurant.

    Admission:

    Adult £8.00, Concession £5.00 (Children 5 - 16 years / Senior Citizens /Passport to Leisure), Family ticket (2 adults and 2 children): £21.00.

  4. Ted Hughes

    Mytholmroyd

    Ted Hughes

    Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was born at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, on the 17th August 1930. He lived there unti...

    Ted Hughes (1930-1998) was born at 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, on the 17th August 1930. He lived there until he was seven, when his family moved to Mexborough. During his childhood he spent many hours exploring the countryside around Mytholmroyd, and these experiences and the influences of the landscape on him were to inform much of his later poetry.

    One of the greatest poets of his generation, Hughes also wrote stories, plays, reviews and essays. He translated the work of, amongst others, Ovid, Racine, Aeschylus and Euripides. He wrote extensively for children, including the story The Iron Man, which was turned into the Disney blockbuster The Iron Giant. Hughes's interests in other art forms led to many collaborations, most famously with the artist Leonard Baskin.

    Although best known in the UK, Hughes was a writer of international standing. He won numerous awards throughout his career, including four for his final collection, Birthday Letters. Hughes became Poet Laureate in 1984 until his death on 28th October 1998.

  5. Heptonstall Museum

    Heptonstall

    Heptonstall Museum

    Heptonstall Museum offers you the opportunity to expore the changing importance of Heptonstall and the surrounding area, from prehistoric times unt...
    Heptonstall Museum offers you the opportunity to expore the changing importance of Heptonstall and the surrounding area, from prehistoric times until recent day. Find out about the infamous Cragg Vale Coiners, who produced counterfeit currency and committed murder to conceal their illegal trade. Explore the temporary exhibition relating to local stories, objects and heroes. Discover the exploits of Heptonstall's Parliamentarian garrison during the English Civil War and uncover intriguing stories of the everyday lives of the people of Heptonstall and the Upper Calder Valley. Heptonstall Grammar School was established in 1642, the present building was rebuilt in 1771, where it continued to be used as a school until 1889. In 1898 it became the Yorkshire Penny Bank whose staff were careful to preserve some of the original features of the school: including a black oak desk at which pupils took their lessons which can still be found inside the Museum today. FREE Entry. Open March to October: Saturdays, Sundays and Bank Holidays 11:00 - 16:00. Closed November to February.
  6. Victoria Theatre, Halifax

    Halifax

    Victoria Theatre

    Situated in the heart of the bustling Halifax Town Centre, this thriving theatre prides itself on an exciting and varied programme of live events. ...
    Situated in the heart of the bustling Halifax Town Centre, this thriving theatre prides itself on an exciting and varied programme of live events. From no-holds-barred rock 'n' roll, chart-topping pop and sumptuous ballet, to cutting-edge comedy, fantastic family shows, annual pantomime and unmissable drama - there's entertainment for everyone to enjoy. Whether you're looking for an unforgettable rollercoaster of emotions, uncontrollable laughter and maybe to shed a tear; to lose yourself in the greatest rock and pop concerts; to marvel at true talent and sensational skills; or simply to spend an evening of relaxation and entertainment with family and friends - it's all happening at the Victoria Theatre! With a choice of 1,512 seats over three levels: Stalls, Circle and Balcony, no obstructive pillars and raked seating on every level, the Victoria Theatre has the size and magnificence for a sensational theatre experience for everyone.
  7. Halifax Minster

    Halifax

    Halifax Minster

    Located in the heart of Halifax, Halifax Minster is a handsome 15th Century Grade 1 listed Parish Church; a site of major historical importance, a ...
    Located in the heart of Halifax, Halifax Minster is a handsome 15th Century Grade 1 listed Parish Church; a site of major historical importance, a place of worship, prayer, of civic engagement, education and culture; with a year-round programme of events for you to enjoy. The church of St John the Baptist Halifax was given its Minster status in 2009 in recognition of its important role in the civic life of the town and borough. Visit Halifax Minster to enjoy a tour of the beautiful and historic interior of the building, the beautiful stained glass and painted wooden ceiling panels. Look out for the mice carved into the Thompson chairs in the Wellington Chapel! Children can enjoy Halifax Minster too. When you arrive with the kids you have free use of a backpack containing a short guide around the Minster, an eye-spy guide to the 16 stained-glass windows, paper, pencils and crayons to make drawings of all the interesting things you'll find and a torch to help you find them! Enjoy organ recitals on Thursdays at 1pm from March to end of October. Lunch (£4) is available from 12.15pm. There are also regular performances by the Minster Choir, our Summer festival in June & July and other events throughout the year. Entrance to Halifax Minster is FREE, with donations welcome to help us maintain and preserve this beautiful building for future generations to enjoy.
  8. Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum

    Halifax

    Duke of Wellington's Regiment Museum

    Representing over 300 years of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, since its raising in 1702, this museum tells the stories of the soldiers who serv...
    Representing over 300 years of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, since its raising in 1702, this museum tells the stories of the soldiers who served using their own words. The ‘Iron Duke’, Arthur Wellesley, was the Colonel of the 33rd which became, after his death, the only Regiment to be named after a person not of the Royal Blood. Displays include items relating to the Duke himself and to the rich and varied history of the regiment, including the campaigns of 33rd and 76th foot. The Duke of Wellington’s Regiment has a long association with the town of Halifax and its location within Bankfield Museum complements the wider history on display here. FREE Admission
  9. Dean Clough, photo by Bruce Fitzgerald

    Halifax

    Dean Clough

    Eat, drink, shop, pamper yourself with health & beauty treatments and enjoy art at Dean Clough! These converted mills, formerly the largest car...
    Eat, drink, shop, pamper yourself with health & beauty treatments and enjoy art at Dean Clough! These converted mills, formerly the largest carpet manufacturing factory in the world, are now home to about 150 businesses and arts venues. These include the Crossley Gallery, I.O.U and the Viaduct Theatre; bars and restaurants such as Eds Urban Eats. The Loom Lounge, Engine Room Cafe & Kitchen, Mill Bar & Kitchen, Babar Khan Restaurant & Buffet, Stod Fold and Riccis Tapas and Cicchetti. You can also shop at Jack Wills, The Design Shop, Pam's Shop and The Loom Lounge Roastery. Don't forget to see the (ever growing) Lego model of Dean Clough - it's awesome!
  10. Bankfield Museum, Halifax

    Halifax

    Bankfield Museum

    A Museum since 1887, Bankfield tells the story of Halifax and Calderdale, using its rich and diverse collections. Set in the attractive surround...
    A Museum since 1887, Bankfield tells the story of Halifax and Calderdale, using its rich and diverse collections. Set in the attractive surroundings of Akroyd Park, at the centre of Akroydon model village conservation area, this Victorian mansion was the home of local mill owner, philanthropist and MP, Colonel Edward Akroyd. We are a short distance from the centre of Halifax, with free parking and close to public transport links. Bankfield’s exhibitions cover local history, costume, art, toys, military history, jewellery and textiles from around the world. Our collections contain objects from Ancient Egypt through to the 21st Century as we continue to collect and preserve items for future generations.
  11. Dies used By the Cragg Vale Coiners

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Coiners

    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's a...
    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’. This gang's activities were said to be so damaging that they threatened to wreck Britain's currency. David Hartley learnt his trade as an ironworker in Birmingham, before getting into trouble and moving back to Mytholmroyd to escape the authorities. Once returned to his home at Bell House farmhouse (which is now a bed & breakfast accommodation with educational facilities) David used ironworking as a cover to clip or file the edges from gold coins, milling the edges back so the change was all but unnoticeable, and making counterfeit coins from the shavings whilst returning the clipped coins into circulation. David’s activities soon spread to other farms, with families at nearby Hill Top Farm and Keelham Farm soon becoming involved; forming the beginnings of the gang of Cragg Vale Coiners. Local publicans also helped by placing the counterfeit coins into circulation. David Hartley seems to have been an enigmatic leader, becoming known as 'King David' Hartley and the gang’s numbers grew considerably until well over 30 individuals were involved. Rumours of the gang's activities reached the authorities, who sent an excise man named William Deighton to investigate. One of the coiners turned King’s Evidence and betrayed the gang, leading to Hartley's arrest at an Inn in Halifax on 14th October 1769. Hartley's brother Isaac offered £100 to anybody who would kill Deighton. It is alleged that the plotters planned Deighton's murder at an Inn in Mytholmroyd called Barbary's, which is now gone, but was located on the opposite side of the road to the present day Dusty Miller. On November 10th 1769 at Bull Close Lane near Halifax, Deighton was approached by two men, Matthew Normanton and Robert Thomas. Deighton was shot dead, his body also showing signs of having been stamped on. Just days later, the Government offered a reward of £100 for information leading to the arrest of the murderers and a pardon for anybody, bar the killers, who would turn King's Evidence. Over 30 people were subsequently arrested, including 'King David' Hartley, who was sentenced to death on April 6th 1770 and hanged at Tynburn, near York, on April 28th. His body is buried in the graveyard of the village of Heptonstall, above Hebden Bridge. Robert Thomas was acquitted of Deighton's murder, but was later hanged in 1774 for being a highwayman. Matthew Normanton initially fled the authorities, but was later caught and hanged in 1775. Isaac Hartley was never brought to trial due to a lack of evidence and died in 1815, aged 78. Heptonstall Museum has on display some of the original dies used by the Coiners to stamp their gold discs into coins, as well as panels telling more of their story.
  12. Smith Art Gallery, Brighouse

    Brighouse

    Smith Art Gallery & Brighouse Library

    This purpose built Art Gallery and public library, known as ‘The Rydings’, is surrounded by a beautiful park and gardens. The front gallery host...
    This purpose built Art Gallery and public library, known as ‘The Rydings’, is surrounded by a beautiful park and gardens. The front gallery hosts an exhibition of oil paintings, based on People and Places, including works by Atkinson Grimshaw, Marcus Stone and Thomas Sydney Cooper. The rear gallery hosts changing displays, covering a wide variety of themes from local artists to touring exhibitions, including photography, mixed media and sculpture, ensuring there is always something new and different to enjoy. The gallery was built by Alderman William Smith and donated, along with his collection of artwork, to the people of Brighouse in 1907. The Smith Art Gallery provides a pleasant atmosphere to meet your friends, interact with beautiful paintings and do the family gallery hunt/trail. There is also an exciting programme of temporary exhibitions in a range of media from paintings to photography and textiles, providing a wonderful experience each time you visit.
  13. Christ Church, Sowerby Bridge

    Sowerby Bridge

    Christ Church, Sowerby Bridge

    Christ Church is the Parish Church of Sowerby Bridge in the Diocese of West Yorkshire and the Dales. It is a warm and welcoming place to visit and ...
    Christ Church is the Parish Church of Sowerby Bridge in the Diocese of West Yorkshire and the Dales. It is a warm and welcoming place to visit and and worship, There are regular services during the week, and plenty of other other activities too. The church is open on a Tuesday and Saturday from 10am till 11:30am for visitors to have a look around and at other times by appointment.
  14. eptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Heptonstall

    Heptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One...
    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One of the first octagonal chapels, it is one of the oldest Methodist churches in continuous use today. This unusual octagonal chapel is open every day. It’s tucked away at the bottom of a flight of steps off Northgate. Entry is free, with donations to the upkeep of the Chapel welcome. Please email Circuit Heritage Officer Mr. John Wilson regarding visits and other activities, at chme@calderdalemethodists.org.uk. Methodism in Heptonstall began with the firebrand Scot William Darney. He founded many societies on both sides of the Pennines as he travelled, preaching as he went. The Heptonstall “Darney Society” was visited by Charles and John Wesley in 1747. In these early days, Heptonstall had a preacher every sixth Sunday, with the travelling preachers receiving no stipend or allowance, eating where they could. John Wesley continued to visit Heptonstall and there were always immense crowds to hear him. The society was so successful it was decided to build a chapel. The octagon shape was then fashionable for Methodist preaching houses, as it avoided conflict with the established church. The building was finished in 1764. It was intended to hold 200 people, but by 1802 there were 337 members and over 1000 scholars. The solution was to knock down the far end of the chapel, lengthen the walls and rebuild it, preserving its octagonal shape. Heptonstall is located on The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route that circles the borough of Calderdale. Please call in to visit the Chapel if you're passing by.
  15. Halifax Gibbet

    Halifax

    Halifax Gibbet

    Imagine a market day in Halifax. Two thieves are being led from the gaol and in turn, forced to lie with their heads between two upright posts. Abo...
    Imagine a market day in Halifax. Two thieves are being led from the gaol and in turn, forced to lie with their heads between two upright posts. Above, a fearsome blade is glinting in the sunlight. A horse, yoked to a rope, wrenches out the security pin and the blade slices down..! The date was 30th April 1650 and Halifax Gibbet had claimed its last victim. The Halifax gibbet was an early guillotine. The Lord of the Manor possessed the authority to execute summarily by decapitation any thief who was caught with stolen goods to the value of 13½d or more, or who confessed to having stolen goods of at least that value. Decapitation was a fairly common method of execution in England, but Halifax was unusual in that it employed a guillotine-like machine that appears to have been unique in the country, and it continued to decapitate petty criminals until the mid-17th century. A 15 foot high replica of the Gibbet has been constructed on the original site at the bottom of Gibbet Street. To find the Gibbet; from Halifax town centre, take Pellon Lane, turning left onto Bedford Street North. The Gibbet is at the end of the street, to your left, on the junction with Gibbet Street. The Gibbet’s original blade has been preserved and is on display at Bankfield Museum, Halifax.
  16. Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax

    Halifax Town Hall

    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnific...
    Halifax's ornate town hall was designed by Charles Barry, who also designed the Houses of Parliament. This Grade ll* listed building has a magnificent 180ft tower and spire which is enriched with sculpture. Free guided tours of Halifax Town Hall can be arranged to help you learn more about its fascinating history. Please contact the Mayor's Office on 01422 393022.

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