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  1. Halifax Borough Market

    Halifax

    Halifax Borough Market

    This splendid Grade II* listed Victorian market hall was voted the best in Britain in 2008. Come and enjoy the hustle, bustle and traditional splen...
    This splendid Grade II* listed Victorian market hall was voted the best in Britain in 2008. Come and enjoy the hustle, bustle and traditional splendour of a thriving retail market with a warm and friendly atmosphere. The impressive and historic Halifax Borough Market was built between 1891 and 1896 and was officially opened by the Duke and Duchess of York (later King George V and Queen Mary). As a first time visitor to this award-winning market, you could be forgiven for thinking that you had stumbled on to the set of a period TV drama. Decor and atmosphere combine to create a shopping experience that just can't be matched by mundane and soulless out-of-town supermarkets. Alongside the outstanding traditional family butchers and fruit and vegetable stalls which have passed down through generations, are the new stall holders tempting our taste buds with a bounty of exotic produce from the continent. Nor will the markets's fishmongers disappoint. You can treat your inner child with toffees, fudge, boiled sweets, cakes and brandy snaps. Sandwiches, pies, olives and chorizo can be found alongside haberdashers, vibrant flower shops, perfumers, leather goods, books, underwear, CDs, DVDs, hardware, fancy dress and more! With several cafes and coffee shops where you can stop for cuppa and a butty (go on, have cake too) you can easily refuel to carry on shopping. From the exotic to the native, extravagant to inexpensive, the quality of produce on offer remains unsurpassed. The traditional splendour of Halifax Borough Market offers a real destination shopping experience. Open Monday to Saturday 9am - 5pm.
  2. People's Park, Halifax

    Halifax

    People's Park

    People's Park is one of the finest surviving examples of a "Joseph Paxton" Park. Created in 1857, the Park was donated to the people of Halifax by ...
    People's Park is one of the finest surviving examples of a "Joseph Paxton" Park. Created in 1857, the Park was donated to the people of Halifax by Sir Francis Crossley. It is to be maintained by Calderdale Council, then the 'Halifax Corporation', for all time. Situated at the Western edge of Halifax, the 12.5 acre site is in the heart of a conservation area. It provides a green and pleasant haven. A restoration programme that began in 1995 has revitalised the park with new facilities such as the children's play area, public toilets and the visitor's centre. The bandstand, water features (including the central fountain, serpentine pools, gargoyle fountains in the pavilion pools), statues, balustrading, pavilion and cast iron bridges have all been conserved and repaired and disabled access provided to the park via the college entrance and onto the terrace promenade. People's Park has been awarded the coveted Green Flag status.
  3. Ogden Water Country Park

    Halifax

    Ogden Water Country Park

    Ogden Water offers excellent opportunities to escape from the stresses and strains of everyday life.

    Ogden Water is a very popular desti...

    Ogden Water offers excellent opportunities to escape from the stresses and strains of everyday life.

    Ogden Water is a very popular destination for picnics, walking, family outings and nature activities and was officially Yorkshire's Favourite Reservoir in 2018, having won a public vote. 

    Why not enjoy a picnic at our picnic tables whilst taking in the stunning views.

    There are hourly buses to Ogden Water from Halifax bus station.

    There is a lovely level footpath around Ogden Water and three longer walks from the site. Friends of Calderdale Countryside have produced a detailed guide which is available at the Ogden shop, local visitor centres and the Heart of the Pennines on-line shop.

  4. Onlineauthentic

    Halifax

    Onlineauthentic

    OnlineAuthentic specialise in memorabilia sales, event management, celebrity signings, guest speaker management, auctions, fundraising and charity ...
    OnlineAuthentic specialise in memorabilia sales, event management, celebrity signings, guest speaker management, auctions, fundraising and charity events. They guarantee authenticity of all memorabilia, proven by a unique certificate of authenticity with every item.
  5. Jerusalem Farm & Wade Wood Local Nature Reserve

    Halifax

    Jerusalem Farm & Wade Wood Local Nature Reserve

    Jerusalem Farm and Wade Wood is a 13-hectare nature reserve with many woodland pathways and perfect spots for picnics and paddling. The kids will h...
    Jerusalem Farm and Wade Wood is a 13-hectare nature reserve with many woodland pathways and perfect spots for picnics and paddling. The kids will have great fun splashing about in the stream and there is plenty of space to play. There are also picnic tables and spots in the shade. The Calderdale Way passes close by the reserve. Wade Wood and the landscape around it is home to many woodland birds such as nuthatches, Tree Creepers, Goldfinch, Robins and Woodpeckers. If you're lucky (and very quiet) you may also catch a sight of deer! The site has a wide variety of fungi during the autumn months. However is known for midges on summer evenings, so don't forget the midge repellent when you come to visit! Please note: Access to the woods from the car park is by a steep grass track. There is a zig-zag path from the car park to the grass, which is stroller accessible for the kids. The car park is only small and also serves the camp site and self-catering accommodation at Jerusalem Farm, so please arrive early if you're coming to visit. The car park closes at dusk and is locked for the night.
  6. Revo Records

    Halifax

    Revo Records

    Browse hundreds of new and second hand Vinyl, CDs DVDs in this friendly music shop.
    Browse hundreds of new and second hand Vinyl, CDs DVDs in this friendly music shop.
  7. Hali-Facts Trail front page

    Halifax

    Hali-Facts Heritage Discovery Trail

    This Heritage Discovery Trail has been designed for children and families, but will be enjoyed by people of all ages. It will take you on a walking...
    This Heritage Discovery Trail has been designed for children and families, but will be enjoyed by people of all ages. It will take you on a walking tour around Halifax town centre, asking you to use your detective skills of observation, thinking, note-taking and sketching as you go. You can complete the Discovery Trail in a way that suits you. It can be done in ‘bite-size’ chunks over several visits or if you are feeling brave and have a lot of energy, you can try it all in one go! Many of the tasks can be completed by looking at the outsides of the buildings but sometimes, you will be invited to pop indoors to have a search around. Please check the opening times for each building that allows this – details are on their websites which are listed throughout the booklet. As far as is reasonably practicable, each building on this Discovery Trail provides a standard of access for disabled people equal to that enjoyed by the rest of the public.
  8. Savile Park, Halifax

    Halifax

    Savile Park

    Savile Park is large, open park area just outside Halifax town centre, a ten minute bus ride from Halifax town centre with a very regular service. ...
    Savile Park is large, open park area just outside Halifax town centre, a ten minute bus ride from Halifax town centre with a very regular service. It is also usually easy to find parking. The park is great for fairly flat walking on good paths. There are some fine Victorian mansions around the edge and some great views of one of Britain's finest follies; Wainhouse Tower. The park is used for great family events such as when the circus comes to town and the annual Halifax Agricultural Show.
  9. North Dean Woods

    Halifax

    North Dean Woods

    North Dean Wood is an example of the type of woodland that used to cover much of the countryside in the North of England. The woods lie on the outs...
    North Dean Wood is an example of the type of woodland that used to cover much of the countryside in the North of England. The woods lie on the outskirts of Greetland and offer an extensive network of footpaths, including part of the Calderdale Way. You will also discover a wide variety of plant and birdlife. The entrance to the wood is near to Clay House and Clay House Park. Oaks are the most common trees in the wood, but in some areas Birch trees are dominant. You will also find Beech, Sycamore, Rowan, holly, Alder and ash trees. Over 60 different species of birds have been recorded in North Dean Wood. Some are resident all year, some are summer visitors arriving in spring and leaving in autumn and a few are winter visitors. A wide range of plant life can be found, from mosses, liverworts and lichens to the mighty trees and some fungi, which offer a varied and colourful display, especially in the autumn. The many flowering plants include Heather, Bilberry, Wood Sorrel and Bluebells. Wildlife in North Dean can be difficult to observe, with many of the residents being nocturnal and the remainder keeping well hidden even when active during the day. Most often seen are rabbits and squirrels. Foxes and Stoats may also be seen although both are largely nocturnal . Smaller mammals such as Shrews, Voles, Mice and hedgehogs are present, but seldom seen. Frogs, Toad and Newts can be found in the wettest areas of the Wood. The visible rocks in North Dean Wood are from the Upper Carboniferous Period (formed about 250 million years ago). The rocks belong to the Millstone Grit Series. The valley floor is covered with a thick layer of gravel and sand, deposited in the Late Glacial Period when, as the ice melted, vast quantities of water flowed into what is now Calderdale through the gaps at Waldsden and Cliviger. On top of this gravel is silt deposited by the River Calder, on which the plant cover grows. There are regular bus services from Huddersfield and Halifax bus stations to Greetland.
  10. Lightcliffe Tower, Old St Matthews Church - Resting Place of Ann Walker

    Halifax

    Lightcliffe Tower, Old St Matthews Church - Resting Place of Ann Walker

    Ann Walker’s grandfather, William, largely funded the Georgian Lightcliffe Old St Matthew Church, which was erected in 1775 and replaced a...

    Ann Walker’s grandfather, William, largely funded the Georgian Lightcliffe Old St Matthew Church, which was erected in 1775 and replaced an earlier, Tudor foundation.

    William also built Cliffe Hill just a short walk away, where Ann Walker lived. Ann and her family worshipped at St Matthew’s Church and had family pews.

    After becoming the companion and wife of Anne Lister of Shibden Hall, the couple had a green velvet-lined pew installed at St Matthew’s so they could worship together there.

    Ann died in February 1854 and was buried in the church, according to her memorial plaque “under the pulpit”. The exact location of this pulpit is the subject of debate, as the church was replaced in 1880 with the current church building.

    The old St Matthew’s church was used as a mortuary chapel, but it fell into decay after suffering serious damage from a storm in the 1960’s. Vandalism and theft followed and the church was demolished in the early 1970s.

    Fortunately the ‘Friends of Friendless Churches’ rescued the memorials from the walls of the church and they are now stored in Lightcliffe Tower, the only remaining part of the old St Matthew Church.

    A memorial stone has been placed on the spot where it is thought that Ann lies and the brass memorial plaque to her now hangs high inside the tower. The plaque is hard to decipher but reads:

    In memory of Ann Walker of Cliffe Hill who was born May 20th 1803 and died February 25th 1854

    and is buried underneath the pulpit in this church.

    And of her niece, Mary who died June 6th 1845 and is buried in this churchyard.

    And of her nephews George Sackville (Sutherland) who died in 1843 aged 12,

    John Walker who died in 1836 aged 1 year and are buried in Kirkmichael, Rosshire,

    the children of George MacKay and Elizabeth Sutherland

    Sadly there are no known images of Ann Walker. Most of what we know about her comes from Anne Lister's diaires and letters. Ann Walker is portrayed by Sophie Rundle in the BBC ONE/ HBO drma Gentleman Jack.

    You will find Lightcliffe Tower along Wakefield Road, in Lightcliffe, Halifax. The tower is located on your left (as you are driving out of Halifax) just before Till Carr Lane, opposite the Sun Country Inn, HX3 8TH.

  11. The Book Corner & Bookworms

    Halifax

    The Book Corner & Bookworms

    The Book Corner is an independent bookshop selling a wide range of both fiction and non-fiction titles. Joined to Bookworms, a dedicated childr...
    The Book Corner is an independent bookshop selling a wide range of both fiction and non-fiction titles. Joined to Bookworms, a dedicated children’s bookshop, the team have created a unique space for the whole family to browse their favourite books. If they haven’t got it on the shelf they offer a free next day ordering service. Also stocking a beautiful range of stationery, notebooks, cards and literary gifts for all ages.
  12. Halifax Music Heritage Trail

    Halifax

    Halifax Music Heritage Trail

    Halifax has a surprising and quite amazing music history. From Dusty Springfield, Rod Stewart, Iggy Pop to Joy Division, Pulp, The Cure, The Jackso...
    Halifax has a surprising and quite amazing music history. From Dusty Springfield, Rod Stewart, Iggy Pop to Joy Division, Pulp, The Cure, The Jacksons, the list of artists who have played the town is long and diverse. The Halifax Music Heritage Trail, created by Michael Ainsworth and Trevor Simpson, celebrates this important cultural history of our town.

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