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  1. Pennine Bridleway & The Mary Towneley Loop

    Across Calderdale

    Pennine Bridleway & The Mary Towneley Loop

    The Pennine Bridleway runs for 205 miles (330km) from Derbyshire to Cumbria. The Bridleway runs roughly parallel with the Pennine Way, but offers ...
    The Pennine Bridleway runs for 205 miles (330km) from Derbyshire to Cumbria. The Bridleway runs roughly parallel with the Pennine Way, but offers access for Horse Riders, Cyclists and Walkers. The Mary Towneley Loop is a 47 mile section of the Pennine Bridleway with a variety of tracks, looping past Blackshaw Head, Heptonstall, Hebden Bridge Todmorden, Walsden where you will encounter open moorland and hidden reservoirs, ancient packhorse tracks sweeping into valleys with gritstone walls, mill chimneys and canals offering a both a glimpse of past histories.
  2. Apple Tree Farm Alpaca Walks

    Hebden Bridge

    Apple Tree Farm Alpaca Walks

    Hello!! We (and the Alpacas) are based in the Southern Pennines in the picturesque Calder Valley outside the small market town of Hebden Bridge. We...
    Hello!! We (and the Alpacas) are based in the Southern Pennines in the picturesque Calder Valley outside the small market town of Hebden Bridge. We are a 15 minute bus ride from town. We first became interested in Alpacas in 2012 and have then since travelled South Wales to build our small award winning heard. Our boys are suited to the South Pennines given there native roots in South America and they love the long Summer days up in the hills just outside the lovely village of Blackshaw Head which is a mere 5 minutes away by car and bus from Heben Bridge. Come along and go for a walk with one of the guys, both you and they will love walking round our land in the country and you will experience the serenity and peacefulness of these beautiful Alpacas, and oh.. did I forget, the scenery ‘ain’t alf’ bad either!
  3. Halifax Playhouse

    Halifax

    Halifax Playhouse

    Halifax Playhouse, the home of Halifax Thespians, and one of West Yorkshire's leading venues for live theatre. It's often said that you never kn...
    Halifax Playhouse, the home of Halifax Thespians, and one of West Yorkshire's leading venues for live theatre. It's often said that you never know what to expect when you step through the doors of Halifax Playhouse. As the home of Halifax Thespians, the Playhouse can surprise, delight, amuse and entertain, and that's before the interval. The enthusiasm of the actors, singers, dancers and musicians who perform at the Playhouse really does shine through, giving you a first class night out (or a matinee) every time. Relax in the cosy and welcoming surroundings of the Playhouse Bar. It is open from 7pm (6.45pm on Saturdays) to 11pm when there is a show on. You can order your interval drinks before the show to avoid queuing later. The Playhouse coffee lounge opens in the interval of most shows, serving fairtrade coffee or tea. At other times coffee is available from the bar.
  4. Wainhouse Tower, Halifax photo by Alastair Wallace

    Halifax

    Wainhouse Tower

    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The ...
    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The structure was never actually used as a working chimney and as such, is regarded by many as one of Britain's finest follies. The Tower is open to the public on the Bank Holidays below. For those brave enough to tackle the 403 steps to the viewing gallery at the top, the stunning views make it well worth the climb. Wainhouse Tower is open from 10am, with the last ascent at 3.30pm and closing at 4pm, on the following dates in 2020: Easter Monday April 13th May Day Friday May 8th Spring Bank Monday May 25th August Bank Monday August 31st Adult £3.50 Children £2.50 Family ticket (2 Adults & 2 Children) £10 Adult Passport to Leisure Holders (PPL) £3 Child Passport to Leisure (PPL) £2 Born in 1817 John Edward Wainhouse inherited his Uncle’s Dyeworks on Washer Lane, Halifax in 1856. The Dyeworks were typical of the day, causing considerable pollution because of smoke emissions. Halifax was badly affected by smog. For weeks on end the smoke laden atmosphere blanketed the town, reducing sunlight and contaminating the landscape with soot and sulphur trioxide. This national problem caused the Government to introduce a Smoke Abatement Act. Wainhouse developed the idea of building a chimney 350 metres up the hillside from the Dyeworks, connected to it by an underground tunnel. Sir Henry Edwards, A wealthy neighbour of John Edward Wainhouse, made complaints about the smoke nuisance caused by the Dyeworks, leading to a feud between the two men. Mr Isaac Booth (who was also Sir Henry’s architect) was asked by Wainhouse to design and build the mill chimney. The design incorporated an internal staircase that led to four balcony features. This exacerbated the deepening feud between Wainhouse and Sir Henry. Sir Henry, an extrovert and boastful man, claimed that his private estate at Pye Nest could not be viewed from any house o the hills. Wainhouse said he would rectify this by putting an observatory at the top of his chimney. Work commenced in 1871. In 1873, as a result of the feuding; the architect Isaac Booth decided he could no longer work for either man. This led to the appointment of Richard Swarbrick Dugdale, who redesigned the upper section of the building. The new design incorporated a corbelled and balustrade balcony, surmounted by a lantern dome and finial. The building was completed on the 9th September 1875. It is estimated that over 9,000 tonnes of materials were used. The total cost is thought to be in the region of £15,000. However, by the time the building was completed, it was clear that it would never be used as a chimney. The Washer Lane Dyeworks had been sold in 1874 to the works manager Mr Henry Mossman. The sale did not include the Tower. It is thought that Mossman saw the then uncompleted building to be a liability. This point of view is difficult to understand given the fact that Mossman was then prosecuted under the Smoke Abatement Act. Mossman proved that considerable efforts were made to abate the smoke nuisance by pulling down six existing small chimneys …and erecting a large chimney in their place! John Edward Wainhouse died on 26th July 1883 at the age of 66. He as buried in the family grave at Holy Trinity Churchyard, Halifax. The gravestone is located against the boundary wall on the south side of the Church. The Tower and three acres of surrounding land was sold by auction in 1887. The Tower changed hands several times until coming under the ownership of the Halifax Corporation in 1919. During the Second World War the Tower was used by the military authorities as an observation post. As a result of the reorganisation of Local Government in 1974, Wainhouse Tower became the property of Calderdale Council. Today the Tower is used as a viewing platform; open to the public on Bank Holidays and other select days through the year
  5. The Birchcliffe Centre

    Hebden Bridge

    The Birchcliffe Centre

    The Birchcliffe Centre is owned by the charity Pennine Heritage, created as a result of efforts to save the magnificent Birchcliffe Baptist Chapel,...
    The Birchcliffe Centre is owned by the charity Pennine Heritage, created as a result of efforts to save the magnificent Birchcliffe Baptist Chapel, which now houses the Centre. The Birchcliffe Centre is now an expansive conference, exhibition and events venue. home to the Pennine Horizons Digital Archive, the Hebden Bridge Local History Society, the After Alice Project, and a number of valued tenants. The auditorium, mezzanine and yoga studio are all available for hire. All monies received go towards furthering the charitable aims of Pennine Heritage.
  6. eptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Heptonstall

    Heptonstall Octagonal Methodist Chapel

    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One...
    Built in 1764, the design and construction of this Grade II listed Octagonal Chapel were overseen by John Wesley, who frequently preached here. One of the first octagonal chapels, it is one of the oldest Methodist churches in continuous use today. This unusual octagonal chapel is open every day. It’s tucked away at the bottom of a flight of steps off Northgate. Entry is free, with donations to the upkeep of the Chapel welcome. Please email Circuit Heritage Officer Mr. John Wilson regarding visits and other activities, at chme@calderdalemethodists.org.uk. Methodism in Heptonstall began with the firebrand Scot William Darney. He founded many societies on both sides of the Pennines as he travelled, preaching as he went. The Heptonstall “Darney Society” was visited by Charles and John Wesley in 1747. In these early days, Heptonstall had a preacher every sixth Sunday, with the travelling preachers receiving no stipend or allowance, eating where they could. John Wesley continued to visit Heptonstall and there were always immense crowds to hear him. The society was so successful it was decided to build a chapel. The octagon shape was then fashionable for Methodist preaching houses, as it avoided conflict with the established church. The building was finished in 1764. It was intended to hold 200 people, but by 1802 there were 337 members and over 1000 scholars. The solution was to knock down the far end of the chapel, lengthen the walls and rebuild it, preserving its octagonal shape. Heptonstall is located on The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route that circles the borough of Calderdale. Please call in to visit the Chapel if you're passing by.
  7. Clay House

    Greetland

    Clay House

    Clay House is a Jacobean building, a fine example of seventeenth century vernacular architecture, located within a beautiful rural park in the vil...
    Clay House is a Jacobean building, a fine example of seventeenth century vernacular architecture, located within a beautiful rural park in the village of West Vale, less than a mile form Elland and less than three miles from Halifax. Clay House is the official start (and end) point for The Calderdale Way, a 50-mile walking route that circles the borough of Calderdale. The start of The Calderdale Way is signposted at the rear of the House, with signage, flower beds and a picnic area. The Main hall (7.3m x 10.5m) is a beautiful room with wood panelling, a minstrel gallery, polished wood floor, large stone fireplace and stone mullioned windows. It is licensed for civil ceremonies and can set up to 70 people for a formal meal, or 100 people theatre style for meetings, training sessions or presentations. Terraces and gardens in front and to the side of the House make great backgrounds for photographs and places to enjoy the views across the Park. Access Information: A portable ramp is provided to the front entrance or there is level access to the side; Two small internal ramps enable access to all public areas; A disabled toilet is available The Main Hall is fitted with an Induction Loop.
  8. Cromwell Bottom LNR, Brighouse

    Brighouse

    Cromwell Bottom Nature Reserve

    Cromwell Bottom is one of the richest areas in Calderdale in terms of biodiversity, boasting over 130 species of plant, 200 species of birds, large...
    Cromwell Bottom is one of the richest areas in Calderdale in terms of biodiversity, boasting over 130 species of plant, 200 species of birds, large numbers of mammals, amphibians and lots of invertebrate life. Anyone, adults and chiildren, who is interested in nature needs to visit Cromwell Bottom. The area is mainly woodland with a really good network of paths. There is also a wheelchair and pushchair accessible route. There is a guide to the paths and points of interest available from visitor centres and the Heart of the Pennines on-line shop There is a car park at the reserve and a regular bus service from Halifax bus station
  9. Smith Art Gallery, Brighouse

    Brighouse

    Smith Art Gallery & Brighouse Library

    This purpose built Art Gallery and public library, known as ‘The Rydings’, is surrounded by a beautiful park and gardens. The front gallery host...
    This purpose built Art Gallery and public library, known as ‘The Rydings’, is surrounded by a beautiful park and gardens. The front gallery hosts an exhibition of oil paintings, based on People and Places, including works by Atkinson Grimshaw, Marcus Stone and Thomas Sydney Cooper. The rear gallery hosts changing displays, covering a wide variety of themes from local artists to touring exhibitions, including photography, mixed media and sculpture, ensuring there is always something new and different to enjoy. The gallery was built by Alderman William Smith and donated, along with his collection of artwork, to the people of Brighouse in 1907. The Smith Art Gallery provides a pleasant atmosphere to meet your friends, interact with beautiful paintings and do the family gallery hunt/trail. There is also an exciting programme of temporary exhibitions in a range of media from paintings to photography and textiles, providing a wonderful experience each time you visit.
  10. The Pennine Way

    Todmorden

    The Pennine Way

    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of England and offers 268 miles of the ...
    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of England and offers 268 miles of the finest upland walking in England. A once in a lifetime experience. The Pennine Way enters Calderdale at Blackstone Edge, passing Stoodley Pike, dropping down into the valley at Callis, climbing back up to Colden and over the moors to Widdop. Walkers often say this stretch of over 20 miles is one of the best on the whole route. The Trail is very well way-marked and there are some great views from the route (especially from the iconic Stoodley Pike). If you want to detour into Hebden Bridge on your way, you can use the Hebden Bridge Loop path developed in 2015.
  11. Hebden Bridge Picture House

    Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge Picture House

    Hebden Bridge Picture House ia a cinema that is at the very heart of this vibrant town: a 490 seat, multi-functional arts venue, providing a mix of...
    Hebden Bridge Picture House ia a cinema that is at the very heart of this vibrant town: a 490 seat, multi-functional arts venue, providing a mix of arthouse and mainstream cinema with a proud committment to community provision. As well as cinema, the picture house offers a variety of live events each year, including concerts and theatre, and is one of the main venues usd for the Hebden Bridge Arts Festival.
  12. Halifax Music Heritage Trail

    Halifax

    Halifax Music Heritage Trail

    Halifax has a surprising and quite amazing music history. From Dusty Springfield, Rod Stewart, Iggy Pop to Joy Division, Pulp, The Cure, The Jackso...
    Halifax has a surprising and quite amazing music history. From Dusty Springfield, Rod Stewart, Iggy Pop to Joy Division, Pulp, The Cure, The Jacksons, the list of artists who have played the town is long and diverse. The Halifax Music Heritage Trail, created by Michael Ainsworth and Trevor Simpson, celebrates this important cultural history of our town.
  13. Bankfield Museum, Halifax

    Halifax

    Bankfield Museum

    A Museum since 1887, Bankfield tells the story of Halifax and Calderdale, using its rich and diverse collections. Set in the attractive surround...
    A Museum since 1887, Bankfield tells the story of Halifax and Calderdale, using its rich and diverse collections. Set in the attractive surroundings of Akroyd Park, at the centre of Akroydon model village conservation area, this Victorian mansion was the home of local mill owner, philanthropist and MP, Colonel Edward Akroyd. We are a short distance from the centre of Halifax, with free parking and close to public transport links. Bankfield’s exhibitions cover local history, costume, art, toys, military history, jewellery and textiles from around the world. Our collections contain objects from Ancient Egypt through to the 21st Century as we continue to collect and preserve items for future generations.
  14. Rochdale Canal at Hebden Bridge

    Across Calderdale

    Rochdale Canal

    The Rochdale Canal runs for 33 miles between Sowerby Bridge in Calderdale, West Yorkshire, all the way to Manchester. It runs through the Upper Cal...
    The Rochdale Canal runs for 33 miles between Sowerby Bridge in Calderdale, West Yorkshire, all the way to Manchester. It runs through the Upper Calder Valley passing Luddendenfoot, Mytholmroyd, Hebden Bridge, Todmorden and Walsden. The canal is close to train stations at Sowerby Bridge, Mythomroyd, Hebden Brige, Todmorden and Walsden. There is a towpath all the way which makes it a great flat walking route, suitable for buggies. You can walk short sections by using regular local buses to get you to the start and finish of your walk.
  15. The Walled Garden at Manor Heath Park

    Halifax

    The Walled Garden at Manor Heath Park

    Open all year round, Manor Heath Park's Walled garden is part of this nineteen acre Green Flag Award and Yorkshire in Bloom Gold Award winning p...

    Open all year round, Manor Heath Park's Walled garden is part of this nineteen acre Green Flag Award and Yorkshire in Bloom Gold Award winning park.

    The Walled Garden was once used to grow flowers, fruit and vegetables for the former Manor Heath Mansion (you can read about the history of Manor Heath Park and the Mansion here) and is today used to demonstrate different types of gardening techniques of topical interest and bedding plant trials for Calderdale's parks.

    There are several sections in the walled garden:

    The Container Garden demonstrates the different ways of displaying plants in pots and hanging baskets.

    The Alpine Mint Walk. Enjoy the fragrance of the Corsican Mint planted between the paving stones. Bees and insects love the small blue flowers during the summer.

    The Rock Garden is made from local sandstone and planted with specialist alpines and bulbs.

    Herbaceous Borders using traditional plants for a magnificent summer flowering display.

    Prairie Planting. A bed specially designed and planted with grasses and some herbaceous perennials for very low maintenance i.e. no staking and only trimming back in spring. The coloured grasses and seed heads last right through the autumn and into winter.

    The Necklace Garden boasts tradtional plants and old-fashioned roses growing in a formal setting.

    The Winter Garden features plants of winter interest including flowers, stems, foliage and berries; to illustrate how gardens can still be attractive in winter.

    The Mediterranean Garden shows how plants normally found in the Med can be grown in Calderdale, with plenty of ideas for plants to grow in domestic gardens for the water conscious gardener. The gravel garden shows plants that will survive in hot, dry  places.

    Exhibition English Garden This professional design gives colour and texture throughout the growing season with many unusual plants and bulbs.

    Demonstration Beds. Watch out in summer for trials of new varieties of bedding plants and bedding schemes. If successful, some will be put into practice in flower beds across Calderdale. The Dahlias and Chrysanthemums are grown in the summer by volunteer growers who grow to show standards. We are very fortunate to have them helping us out and we thank them for the time they spend here.

    Rose Walk and Plummery. Enjoy the shade of the willow tunnel and rose walk; see the craftsmanship in the curved dry stone walls built from recycled stone. The Victoria Plum Trees were donated by members of the public. 

    Educational and school visits covering all stages of the national curriculaum can be arranged. Prior booking is essential, please phone Manor Heath on 01422 365631 or email parks@calderdale.gov.uk for more details. 

    When visiting the Walled Garden, you can also visit  The Jungle Experience and refresh with a cuppa and cake at The Flutterbites Cafe.

    Entrance to the Walled Garden and Mnaor Heath Park is FREE. 

    All year round opening times for the Walled Garden are:

    Opening time:10 am every day.

    Closing times: last entry 3.30pm, closed 3.45pm every day except Friday.

    Friday closing: last entry 3pm and closed 3.15pm.

    Educational visits to Manor Heath for schools covering the national curriculum can be arranged by Phoning 01422 365631 or emailing parks@calderdale.gov.uk. Booking is essential.

  16. Hebden Bridge Cruises

    Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge Cruises

    Relax and watch the world go by with a canal cruise, in the heart of the Yorkshire Pennine hills.
    Relax and watch the world go by with a canal cruise, in the heart of the Yorkshire Pennine hills.

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