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  1. Dock Pudding

    Mytholmroyd

    Dock Pudding

    Dock Pudding is a dish that, as far as we know, is only found here in Calderdale. It's made from dock leaves (from a sweet variety called Polygo...

    Dock Pudding is a dish that, as far as we know, is only found here in Calderdale. It's made from dock leaves (from a sweet variety called Polygonum Bistorta or more recently Persicaria Bistorta not the more common cow dock leaves), nettles, oatmeal, onions, butter and seasoning. Resembling spinach, the pudding is fried together with bacon and eggs and served as part of a traditional English breakfast.

    See below for a traditional and alternate Dock Pudding recipe!

  2. Brighouse & Rastrick Brass Band

    Brighouse

    Brighouse & Rastrick Band

    The Brighouse and Rastrick Band is regarded by many as the best and most consistent ‘public subscription band’ in the world. The band was formed...
    The Brighouse and Rastrick Band is regarded by many as the best and most consistent ‘public subscription band’ in the world. The band was formed over 130 years ago through public donations given by the townsfolk of the adjacent villages of Brighouse and Rastrick that face each other across the River Calder in West Yorkshire, England.
  3. Harrison Lord Gallery, Brighouse

    Brighouse

    The Harrison Lord Gallery

    The Harrison Lord Gallery is fast earning a reputation as one of the best places to see and buy contemporary art in West Yorkshire, specialising in...
    The Harrison Lord Gallery is fast earning a reputation as one of the best places to see and buy contemporary art in West Yorkshire, specialising in contemporary art with a local bias. Famous Brighouse artist Peter Brook was one of the first artists to be represented and to this day his work still sells in large numbers through the gallery. The Gallery features a wide range of styles, so there is something for everyone. Regularly-held exhibitions showcase the talents of individual artists.
  4. Cromwell Bottom Local Nature Reserve, Brighouse

    Brighouse

    Cromwell Bottom Local Nature Reserve

    Cromwell Bottom is one of the most important wildlife sites in Calderdale. Situated next to the Calder and Hebble Navigation, the River Calder runs...
    Cromwell Bottom is one of the most important wildlife sites in Calderdale. Situated next to the Calder and Hebble Navigation, the River Calder runs through the reserve. The wetlands and meadows provide a variety of habitats for many insects, including butterflies, moths, dragonflies and damselflies. A bird feeding area attracts many birds to the site, including bullfinch, dunnock, woodpeckers, robins and redpoll. Other birds that can be seen or heard around the site include kingfishers, oystercatchers and curlew. Many mammals and amphibians have also made Cromwell Bottom their home. The reserve is wheelchair friendly, with many of the paths being suitable for wheelchair access. The paths are generally smooth, and there are no steep gradients. A RADAR key is required to open the gate fully to allow easier access. The reserve is accessed from the A6025 (Elland Road). Turn along a road by the side of Cromwell House (a large red brick building), then left under a height barrier into the small car park. The reserve is signposted from the far end of the car park. There are also buses that travel along the A6025.
  5. Dies used By the Cragg Vale Coiners

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Coiners

    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the...

    The apparent tranquillity of Mytholmroyd belies a murky past involving an 18th century counterfeiting gang, the ‘Cragg Vale Coiners’.This gang's activities were said to be so damaging that they threatened to wreck Britain's currency!

    David Hartley learnt his trade as an ironworker in Birmingham, before getting into trouble and moving back to Mytholmroyd to escape the authorities. Once returned to his home at Bell House farmhouse David used ironworking as a cover to clip or file the edges from gold coins, milling the edges back so the change was all but unnoticeable, and making counterfeit coins from the shavings whilst returning the clipped coins into circulation.

    The activity soon spread to other farms, with families at nearby Hill Top Farm and Keelham Farm soon becoming involved; forming the beginnings of the gang of Cragg Vale Coiners. Local publicans also helped by placing the counterfeit coins into circulation.

    David Hartley seems to have been an enigmatic leader, becoming known as 'King David' Hartley. The gang’s numbers grew considerably until well over 30 individuals were involved. Rumours of the gang's activities reached the authorities, who sent an excise man named William Deighton to investigate.

    One of the coiners turned King’s Evidence and betrayed the gang, leading to Hartley's arrest at an Inn in Halifax on 14th October 1769. Hartley's brother Isaac offered £100 to anybody who would kill Deighton. It is alleged that the plotters planned Deighton's murder at an Inn in Mytholmroyd called Barbary's, which is now gone, but was located on the opposite side of the road to the present day Dusty Miller.

    On November 10th 1769 at Bull Close Lane near Halifax, Deighton was approached by two men, Matthew Normanton and Robert Thomas. Deighton was shot dead, his body also showing signs of having been stamped on. Just days later, the Government offered a reward of £100 for information leading to the arrest of the murderers and a pardon for anybody, bar the killers, who would turn King's Evidence.

    Over 30 people were subsequently arrested, including 'King David' Hartley, who was sentenced to death on April 6th 1770 and hanged at Tynburn, near York, on April 28th. His body is buried in the graveyard of the village of Heptonstall, above Hebden Bridge. Robert Thomas was acquitted of Deighton's murder, but was later hanged in 1774 for being a highwayman. Matthew Normanton initially fled the authorities, but was later caught and hanged in 1775. Isaac Hartley was never brought to trial due to a lack of evidence and died in 1815, aged 78.

    Heptonstall Museum has on display some of the original dies used by the Coiners to stamp their gold discs into coins, as well as panels telling more of their story.

    The award-winning novel 'The Gallows Pole' by Ben Myers tells the Coiner's story. 

  6. Wellholme Park, Brighouse

    Brighouse

    Wellholme Park

    Famous for its spectacular floral bedding displays, Wellholme Park has something for just about everyone and has been awarded both the coveted 'Gre...
    Famous for its spectacular floral bedding displays, Wellholme Park has something for just about everyone and has been awarded both the coveted 'Green Flag' status and the prestigious 'Queen Elizabeth II Fields' status. Situated close to Brighouse town centre, the park is easy to reach and has free car parking for visitors. Why not take a stroll around the park, sit and relax in the surroundings, enjoy a picnic, or explore the natural woodlands and follow the path of Clifton Beck that runs through the heart of Wellholme? The newly opened cafe offers a place to relax and chat with family and friends over a drink and snack. If you prefer something more energetic, then perhaps enjoy a game of tennis on one of the four courts, or a game of bowls on one of the two crown greens or the flat bowling green. An exciting playground with scramble net, climbing frame, swings and a roundabout gives hours of enjoyment to our younger visitors. A demanding skateboard park is a test for those who like a spot of boarding and for those who prefer something less strenuous then there is a putting green and crazy golf.
  7. Smith Art Gallery, Brighouse

    Brighouse

    Smith Art Gallery & Brighouse Library

    Please note that the Gallery & Library will be closing to the public from 20th March until further n...

    Please note that the Gallery & Library will be closing to the public from 20th March until further notice.

    This purpose built Art Gallery and public library, known as ‘The Rydings’, is surrounded by a beautiful park and gardens.

    The front gallery hosts an exhibition of oil paintings, based on People and Places, including works by Atkinson Grimshaw, Marcus Stone and Thomas Sydney Cooper. The rear gallery hosts changing displays, covering a wide variety of themes from local artists to touring exhibitions, including photography, mixed media and sculpture, ensuring there is always something new and different to enjoy.

    The gallery was built by Alderman William Smith and donated, along with his collection of artwork, to the people of Brighouse in 1907.

    The Smith Art Gallery provides a pleasant atmosphere to meet your friends, interact with beautiful paintings and do the family gallery hunt/trail.

    There is also an exciting programme of temporary exhibitions in a range of media from paintings to photography and textiles, providing a wonderful experience each time you visit.

  8. The Cragg Vale Incline

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Incline

    The B6138 Cragg Road is located in Mytholmroyd, off the A646 Burnley Road and passes up through the village of Cragg Vale to the moorlands above. ...
    The B6138 Cragg Road is located in Mytholmroyd, off the A646 Burnley Road and passes up through the village of Cragg Vale to the moorlands above. It is arguably the longest continuous ascent in England, climbing 968 feet over 5.5 miles. With an average gradient of 3%, the Cragg Vale Incline isn’t particularly steep, but it is a long drag and a presents a power climb challenge for cyclists. In July 2014 the incline was part of the route of the 2014 Tour de France. Amongst the ‘Grand Depart’ celebrations a team of 18 cyclists towed a baby grand piano up the incline, on a custom-made PianoPorté, invented by sculptor Andy Plant. The team was cheered on by thousands of locals and tourists with live piano concertos played by 15 on-board pianists to encourage their pedalling. Quite a sight! The Cragg Vale Incline has since featured in various editions of the Tour de Yorkshire. The Calderdale Way crosses the Cragg Vale Incline at Church Bank Lane

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