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  1. Andy Thorntons, Greetland, Halifax

    Greetland

    Andy Thornton Showroom

    The world famous Andy Thornton Showroom is open to everyone. A lovingly restored former textile mill in Yorkshi...

    The world famous Andy Thornton Showroom is open to everyone. A lovingly restored former textile mill in Yorkshire is the ultimate destination for restaurateurs, hoteliers, bar owners, designers, developers and home owners looking for something special and unique, that won’t be found anywhere else.

    We offer thousands of products in ranges including contract furniture, decorative lighting, architectural metalwork, wood carvings and decorative accessories. We also stock the UK’s largest selection of architectural antiques and salvage and have a complete range of vintage industrial furniture, lighting and retail display fixtures.

    You can see us on BBC ONE television show 'The Bidding Room', presented by Nigel Havers, which is filmed here at our showroom. 

  2. The Rex Cinema, Elland

    Elland

    The Rex Cinema

    Enjoy a wide range of films and organ concerts in an updated but unspoilt 1912 picture house, one of the oldest purpose built cinemas in the count...
    Enjoy a wide range of films and organ concerts in an updated but unspoilt 1912 picture house, one of the oldest purpose built cinemas in the country. We still have a mid-movie interval for ice cream and treats and you can buy tea, coffee and hot chocolate to enjoy as you watch the film. Ticket Prices: Adults £5.50 Children (14 and under) & senior citizens £4.50 Everyone all day Monday & Thursday morning £4.50 Organ concerts on our Rodgers 333 Olympic theatre organ are held on the third Sunday of every month with a different visiting organist each time - price £5.50 for everyone. Cinema for hire is available for parties (children's or adults'), conference, etc at very competitive rates - Apply to Manager.
  3. Clay House

    Greetland

    Clay House

    Clay House is a Jacobean building, a fine example of seventeenth century vernacular architecture, located within a beautiful rural park in the vil...
    Clay House is a Jacobean building, a fine example of seventeenth century vernacular architecture, located within a beautiful rural park in the village of West Vale, less than a mile form Elland and less than three miles from Halifax. Clay House is the official start (and end) point for The Calderdale Way, a 50-mile walking route that circles the borough of Calderdale. The start of The Calderdale Way is signposted at the rear of the House, with signage, flower beds and a picnic area. The Main hall (7.3m x 10.5m) is a beautiful room with wood panelling, a minstrel gallery, polished wood floor, large stone fireplace and stone mullioned windows. It is licensed for civil ceremonies and can set up to 70 people for a formal meal, or 100 people theatre style for meetings, training sessions or presentations. Terraces and gardens in front and to the side of the House make great backgrounds for photographs and places to enjoy the views across the Park. Access Information: A portable ramp is provided to the front entrance or there is level access to the side; Two small internal ramps enable access to all public areas; A disabled toilet is available The Main Hall is fitted with an Induction Loop.
  4. The Calderdale Way

    Across Calderdale

    The Calderdale Way

    A superb way to go walking in Calderdale - The Calderdale Way is a 50 mile (80 km) walk exploring the...

    A superb way to go walking in Calderdale - The Calderdale Way is a 50 mile (80 km) walk exploring the hills, moors and valleys of Calderdale that recently celebrated its 40th anniversary.

    It is an ‘up and down’ journey with few level sections. However, the higher levels provide some exceptionally fine panoramic views. The main and link routes to the valley bottom are designed so that they can be completed in short stages.

    The Calderdale Way encircles Halifax, Hebden Bridge and Todmorden, following old packhorse ways across the open gritstone hillsides with sections of traditional stone causeway, passing through hillside villages and old mill towns on the banks of the River Calder.

    There are numerous link paths which connect the Calderdale Way to the valley floor. There are medieval settlements at Lumbutts and Mankinholes, and Withens Gate, where the Pennine Way crosses. A short diversion along the Pennine Way takes in the popular walk to the 100ft monument, Stoodley Pike.

    The full length of the route is 51.39 miles, with a total climb of approx 2,600 metres (over 9,000 feet) at a climb rate of 43 metres per mile. This makes a flat equivalent distance of 57.49 miles.

    For more information about walking in Calderdale please visit our Walking page.

    Hot weather leads to an increased risk of moorland fires in Calderdale. Please take care when out and about in moorlands around Calderdale and West Yorkshire. You can find more advice here. The burning of moorland is not a victimless crime. If you see anything suspicious report it to crimestoppers 0800 555111. #moorlandfires @WestYorksPolice @West_Yorks_FRS

  5. Hebden Bridge Picture House

    Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge Picture House

    Hebden Bridge Picture House ia a cinema that is at the very heart of this vibrant town: a 490 seat, multi-functional arts venue, providing a mix...

    Hebden Bridge Picture House ia a cinema that is at the very heart of this vibrant town: a 490 seat, multi-functional arts venue, providing a mix of arthouse and mainstream cinema with a proud committment to community provision. As well as cinema, the picture house offers a variety of live events each year, including concerts and theatre, and is one of the main venues usd for the Hebden Bridge Arts Festival.

  6. Centre Vale Park, Todmorden

    Todmorden

    Centre Vale Park

    Centre Vale Park has been awarded the coveted Green Flag status and the prestigious Queen Elizabeth II Fields status. and is located a short walk (...
    Centre Vale Park has been awarded the coveted Green Flag status and the prestigious Queen Elizabeth II Fields status. and is located a short walk (approx 600 metres) from Todmorden town centre along the A646 Burnley Road. The route of The Calderdale Way, a 50 mile walking route which circles the borough, passes by less than a hundred metres from the park. The park and is home to 'The Lucky Dog' of Todmorden, as made famous in Derren Brown's TV show 'The Experiments' and offers visitors the chance to relax in a green, open space and to enjoy the all weather 5 -a-side football pitches, bowling greens, play area, skate park, cycle way, football pitches and The Conservatory and Animal House; which is open seven days a week between 10am - 4pm (closed Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Year's Day). Centre Vale Park consists of 33 hectares of mature oak and beech woodland intersected by woodland walks and open parkland. The main body of the park landscape also includes formal memorial gardens. It is ideal for walking, sports and formal recreation, picnics and family outings. The public toilets are to the East of the park. The channelled River Calder runs along the North-eastern boundary of the park, adjacent to Burnley Road. For more information about the schedule of events in the park, please ring Todmorden Tourist Information Centre on 01706 818181
  7. The Countryside Code

    Across Calderdale

    The Countryside Code

    The Countryside Code has been updated, to take into account the new circumstances we face as a result of the COV...

    The Countryside Code has been updated, to take into account the new circumstances we face as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Please follow the code so we can all enjoy Calderdale's magnificent countryside responsibly.

    Here's a summary of the Code's key points.

    Respect other people:

    • consider the local community and other people enjoying the outdoors
    • leave gates and property as you find them and follow paths unless wider access is available

    Protect the natural environment:

    • leave no trace of your visit and take your litter home
    • keep dogs under effective control

    Enjoy the outdoors:

    • plan ahead and be prepared
    • follow advice and local signs

    Please follow the hyperlink below for the full version of the guide.

  8. Dean Clough, photo by Bruce Fitzgerald

    Halifax

    Dean Clough

    Eat, drink, shop, pamper yourself with health & beauty treatments and enjoy art at Dean Clough! These converted mills, formerly the largest car...
    Eat, drink, shop, pamper yourself with health & beauty treatments and enjoy art at Dean Clough! These converted mills, formerly the largest carpet manufacturing factory in the world, are now home to about 150 businesses and arts venues. These include the Crossley Gallery, I.O.U and the Viaduct Theatre; bars and restaurants such as Eds Urban Eats. The Loom Lounge, Engine Room Cafe & Kitchen, Mill Bar & Kitchen, Babar Khan Restaurant & Buffet, Stod Fold and Riccis Tapas and Cicchetti. You can also shop at Jack Wills, The Design Shop, Pam's Shop and The Loom Lounge Roastery. Don't forget to see the (ever growing) Lego model of Dean Clough - it's awesome!
  9. The Birchcliffe Centre

    Hebden Bridge

    The Birchcliffe Centre

    Our charity, Pennine Heritage, is extremely sad to announce that the Birchcliffe Centre will be closed t...

    Our charity, Pennine Heritage, is extremely sad to announce that the Birchcliffe Centre will be closed to the public until further notice.

    The Birchcliffe Centre is owned by the charity Pennine Heritage, created as a result of efforts to save the magnificent Birchcliffe Baptist Chapel, which now houses the Centre.

    The Birchcliffe Centre is now an expansive conference, exhibition and events venue. home to the Pennine Horizons Digital Archive, the Hebden Bridge Local History Society, the After Alice Project, and a number of valued tenants.

    The auditorium, mezzanine and yoga studio are all available for hire. All monies received go towards furthering the charitable aims of Pennine Heritage.

  10. People's Park, Halifax

    Halifax

    People's Park

    People's Park is one of the finest surviving examples of a "Joseph Paxton" Park. Created in 1857, the Park was donated to the people of Halifax by ...
    People's Park is one of the finest surviving examples of a "Joseph Paxton" Park. Created in 1857, the Park was donated to the people of Halifax by Sir Francis Crossley. It is to be maintained by Calderdale Council, then the 'Halifax Corporation', for all time. Situated at the Western edge of Halifax, the 12.5 acre site is in the heart of a conservation area. It provides a green and pleasant haven. A restoration programme that began in 1995 has revitalised the park with new facilities such as the children's play area, public toilets and the visitor's centre. The bandstand, water features (including the central fountain, serpentine pools, gargoyle fountains in the pavilion pools), statues, balustrading, pavilion and cast iron bridges have all been conserved and repaired and disabled access provided to the park via the college entrance and onto the terrace promenade. People's Park has been awarded the coveted Green Flag status.
  11. Gibson Mill, Hardcastle Crags

    Hebden Bridge

    Hardcastle Crags & Gibson Mill

    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the...
    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the country. Gibson Mill is situated within Hardcastle Crags woodland beside Hebden Water. The National Trust have put in some superb waymarked walking routes suitable for all abilities. Cross the river on stepping stones and spot birds, insects, amphibians and if you're lucky; deer! You'll find Hardcastle Crags offers a completely different experience throughout the year - from the icicles of midwinter to the carpet of bluebells in the spring. The early 19th century Gibson Mill is situated within the site. A tour of the mill tells the history of the valley and the mill over the past 200 years. The mill also has changing exhibitions throughout the year. Gibson Mill is 100% self-sufficient in energy, water and waste treatment. It has a hydro-electric system, solar photovoltaic panels and a log-burning stove fuelled by wood from the estate. You can also rest and recharge at the Weaving Shed Café, serving delicious ethical and locally-produced food and buy the perfect gift or memento in the shop located there. Built in around 1800,Gibson Mill was one of the first mills of the Industrial Revolution. The mill was driven by a water wheel and produced cotton cloth up until 1890. In the early 1900s, Gibson Mill began to be used as an ‘entertainment emporium’ for the local people. After the Second World War, the mill slipped into disuse, and was acquired by the National Trust in 1950. Hardcastle Crags is open all year round from dawn until dusk, admission to Hardcastle Crags and Gibson Mill are FREE. Dogs are welcome (including in the café and mill) if kept under close control. GETTING THERE You have three options to get to Hardcastle Crags: By car - there is parking at Midgehole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AA) and Clough Hole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AZ). A parking fee applies at both car parks, although parking is free for National Trust members By bus – the 906 runs from Hebden Bridge on weekends between May and October. It will take you to both the bottom and the top of the valley. Walking – there is a route from Hebden Bridge on good paths with a bit of road walking. It will take you about 45 minutes. Pick up a guide from Hebden Bridge Visitor Centre. See below for details of the wildlife you can discover at Hardcastle Crags.
  12. Halifax Gibbet

    Halifax

    Halifax Gibbet

    Imagine a market day in Halifax. Two thieves are being led from the gaol and in turn, forced to lie with their ...

    Imagine a market day in Halifax. Two thieves are being led from the gaol and in turn, forced to lie with their heads between two upright posts. Above, a fearsome blade is glinting in the sunlight. A horse, yoked to a rope, wrenches out the security pin and the blade slices down..! The date was 30th April 1650 and Halifax Gibbet had claimed its last victim.

    The Halifax gibbet was an early guillotine. The Lord of the Manor possessed the authority to execute summarily by decapitation any thief who was caught with stolen goods to the value of 13½d or more, or who confessed to having stolen goods of at least that value.

    Decapitation was a fairly common method of execution in England, but Halifax was unusual in that it employed a guillotine-like machine that appears to have been unique in the country, and it continued to decapitate petty criminals until the mid-17th century.

    A 15 foot high replica of the Gibbet has been constructed on the original site at the bottom of Gibbet Street. To find the Gibbet; from Halifax town centre, take Pellon Lane, turning left onto Bedford Street North. The Gibbet is at the end of the street, to your left, on the junction with Gibbet Street.

    The Gibbet’s original blade has been preserved and is on display at Bankfield Museum, Halifax.

  13. Calder & Hebble Navigation

    Sowerby Bridge

    Calder & Hebble Navigation

    The Calder and Hebble Navigation runs for 21 miles from Wakefield to Sowerby Bridge, Yorkshire. It has 27 locks and a number of flood locks. The...
    The Calder and Hebble Navigation runs for 21 miles from Wakefield to Sowerby Bridge, Yorkshire. It has 27 locks and a number of flood locks. There is a towpath all the way which makes it a great flat walking route. You can do short sections by using local buses to get you to the start and finish of your walk.
  14. The Cragg Vale Incline

    Mytholmroyd

    The Cragg Vale Incline

    The B6138 Cragg Road is located in Mytholmroyd, off the A646 Burnley Road and passes up through the village of Cragg Vale to the moorlands above. ...
    The B6138 Cragg Road is located in Mytholmroyd, off the A646 Burnley Road and passes up through the village of Cragg Vale to the moorlands above. It is arguably the longest continuous ascent in England, climbing 968 feet over 5.5 miles. With an average gradient of 3%, the Cragg Vale Incline isn’t particularly steep, but it is a long drag and a presents a power climb challenge for cyclists. In July 2014 the incline was part of the route of the 2014 Tour de France. Amongst the ‘Grand Depart’ celebrations a team of 18 cyclists towed a baby grand piano up the incline, on a custom-made PianoPorté, invented by sculptor Andy Plant. The team was cheered on by thousands of locals and tourists with live piano concertos played by 15 on-board pianists to encourage their pedalling. Quite a sight! The Cragg Vale Incline has since featured in various editions of the Tour de Yorkshire. The Calderdale Way crosses the Cragg Vale Incline at Church Bank Lane
  15. Wainhouse Tower, Halifax photo by Alastair Wallace

    Halifax

    Wainhouse Tower

    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The ...
    The 253 ft Wainhouse Tower was originally commissioned as a chimney for the local dye works by John Edward Wainhouse in the late 19th century. The structure was never actually used as a working chimney and as such, is regarded by many as one of Britain's finest follies. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Wainhouse Tower was open to the public on the Bank Holidays, for those brave enough to tackle the 403 steps to the viewing gallery at the top, the stunning views make it well worth the climb. We hope that it will be possible to reopen the Tower to visitors in 2021 and will add any dates the Tower may be open to the public here when and if they are confirmed. A Brief History of Wainhouse Tower Born in 1817 John Edward Wainhouse inherited his Uncle’s Dyeworks on Washer Lane, Halifax in 1856. The Dyeworks were typical of the day, causing considerable pollution because of smoke emissions. Halifax was badly affected by smog. For weeks on end the smoke laden atmosphere blanketed the town, reducing sunlight and contaminating the landscape with soot and sulphur trioxide. This national problem caused the Government to introduce a Smoke Abatement Act. Wainhouse developed the idea of building a chimney 350 metres up the hillside from the Dyeworks, connected to it by an underground tunnel. Sir Henry Edwards, A wealthy neighbour of John Edward Wainhouse, made complaints about the smoke nuisance caused by the Dyeworks, leading to a feud between the two men. Mr Isaac Booth (who was also Sir Henry’s architect) was asked by Wainhouse to design and build the mill chimney. The design incorporated an internal staircase that led to four balcony features. This exacerbated the deepening feud between Wainhouse and Sir Henry. Sir Henry, an extrovert and boastful man, claimed that his private estate at Pye Nest could not be viewed from any house o the hills. Wainhouse said he would rectify this by putting an observatory at the top of his chimney. Work commenced in 1871. In 1873, as a result of the feuding; the architect Isaac Booth decided he could no longer work for either man. This led to the appointment of Richard Swarbrick Dugdale, who redesigned the upper section of the building. The new design incorporated a corbelled and balustrade balcony, surmounted by a lantern dome and finial. The building was completed on the 9th September 1875. It is estimated that over 9,000 tonnes of materials were used. The total cost is thought to be in the region of £15,000. However, by the time the building was completed, it was clear that it would never be used as a chimney. The Washer Lane Dyeworks had been sold in 1874 to the works manager Mr Henry Mossman. The sale did not include the Tower. It is thought that Mossman saw the then uncompleted building to be a liability. This point of view is difficult to understand given the fact that Mossman was then prosecuted under the Smoke Abatement Act. Mossman proved that considerable efforts were made to abate the smoke nuisance by pulling down six existing small chimneys …and erecting a large chimney in their place! John Edward Wainhouse died on 26th July 1883 at the age of 66. He as buried in the family grave at Holy Trinity Churchyard, Halifax. The gravestone is located against the boundary wall on the south side of the Church. The Tower and three acres of surrounding land was sold by auction in 1887. The Tower changed hands several times until coming under the ownership of the Halifax Corporation in 1919. During the Second World War the Tower was used by the military authorities as an observation post. As a result of the reorganisation of Local Government in 1974, Wainhouse Tower became the property of Calderdale Council. Today the Tower is used as a viewing platform; open to the public on Bank Holidays and other select days through the year
  16. Viaduct Theatre, Dean Clough

    Halifax

    Viaduct Theatre

    The Viaduct Theatre is a unique subterranean space buried deep underneath the prestigious Dean Clough Mills in Halifax, West Yorkshire.

    ...

    The Viaduct Theatre is a unique subterranean space buried deep underneath the prestigious Dean Clough Mills in Halifax, West Yorkshire.

    Boasting a 300 seat Auditorium, the Viaduct has been used for Theatre Productions, Film Screenings, Chamber Music, Opera, Rock Concerts, Television Programmes & Filming, Installations, Conference and even Weddings!

    The Theatre was established nearly 30 years ago by renowned Resident Theatre Company, Northern Broadsides, whose mixed touring programme of Shakespearean productions, adapted classic plays and new writing in a northern voice have built a significant following.

    Now using The Viaduct Theatre as their home, Northern Broadsides initially recognised the potential of this raw and atmospheric post-industrial performance space and perform here regularly.

    Email contact: info@viaducttheatre.org.uk

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