Leisure & Outdoors

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  1. Apple Tree Farm Alpaca Walks

    Hebden Bridge

    Apple Tree Farm Alpaca Walks

    Hello!! We (and the Alpacas) are based in the Southern Pennines in the picturesque Calder Valley outside the small market town of Hebden Bridge. We...
    Hello!! We (and the Alpacas) are based in the Southern Pennines in the picturesque Calder Valley outside the small market town of Hebden Bridge. We are a 15 minute bus ride from town. We first became interested in Alpacas in 2012 and have then since travelled South Wales to build our small award winning heard. Our boys are suited to the South Pennines given there native roots in South America and they love the long Summer days up in the hills just outside the lovely village of Blackshaw Head which is a mere 5 minutes away by car and bus from Heben Bridge. Come along and go for a walk with one of the guys, both you and they will love walking round our land in the country and you will experience the serenity and peacefulness of these beautiful Alpacas, and oh.. did I forget, the scenery ‘ain’t alf’ bad either!
  2. Gibson Mill, Hardcastle Crags

    Hebden Bridge

    Hardcastle Crags & Gibson Mill

    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the...
    Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the country. Gibson Mill is situated within Hardcastle Crags woodland beside Hebden Water. The National Trust have put in some superb waymarked walking routes suitable for all abilities. Cross the river on stepping stones and spot birds, insects, amphibians and if you're lucky; deer! You'll find Hardcastle Crags offers a completely different experience throughout the year - from the icicles of midwinter to the carpet of bluebells in the spring. The early 19th century Gibson Mill is situated within the site. A tour of the mill tells the history of the valley and the mill over the past 200 years. The mill also has changing exhibitions throughout the year. Gibson Mill is 100% self-sufficient in energy, water and waste treatment. It has a hydro-electric system, solar photovoltaic panels and a log-burning stove fuelled by wood from the estate. You can also rest and recharge at the Weaving Shed Café, serving delicious ethical and locally-produced food and buy the perfect gift or memento in the shop located there. Built in around 1800,Gibson Mill was one of the first mills of the Industrial Revolution. The mill was driven by a water wheel and produced cotton cloth up until 1890. In the early 1900s, Gibson Mill began to be used as an ‘entertainment emporium’ for the local people. After the Second World War, the mill slipped into disuse, and was acquired by the National Trust in 1950. Hardcastle Crags is open all year round from dawn until dusk, admission to Hardcastle Crags and Gibson Mill are FREE. Dogs are welcome (including in the café and mill) if kept under close control. GETTING THERE You have three options to get to Hardcastle Crags: By car - there is parking at Midgehole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AA) and Clough Hole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AZ). A parking fee applies at both car parks, although parking is free for National Trust members By bus – the 906 runs from Hebden Bridge on weekends between May and October. It will take you to both the bottom and the top of the valley. Walking – there is a route from Hebden Bridge on good paths with a bit of road walking. It will take you about 45 minutes. Pick up a guide from Hebden Bridge Visitor Centre. See below for details of the wildlife you can discover at Hardcastle Crags.
  3. Fungus Foray at Jerusalem Farm

    Halifax

    Fungus Foray at Jerusalem Farm

    1st Nov 2019

    10am Join Julie Swift and Phil Singh at Jerusalem Farm near Booth to learn about the fascinating world of fungi. Make a fungus mask and take...
    10am Join Julie Swift and Phil Singh at Jerusalem Farm near Booth to learn about the fascinating world of fungi. Make a fungus mask and take part in a fungus foray on a short walk through the woods. Bring a camera or phone to take pictures of your finds! No dogs on this walk, please. Suitable for ages 5+ (no unaccompanied children. £4 per child (£3 for Passport to Leisure holders). No booking required.
  4. North Dean Woods

    Halifax

    North Dean Woods

    North Dean Wood is an example of the type of woodland that used to cover much of the countryside in the North of England. The woods lie on the outs...
    North Dean Wood is an example of the type of woodland that used to cover much of the countryside in the North of England. The woods lie on the outskirts of Greetland and offer an extensive network of footpaths, including part of the Calderdale Way. You will also discover a wide variety of plant and birdlife. The entrance to the wood is near to Clay House and Clay House Park. Oaks are the most common trees in the wood, but in some areas Birch trees are dominant. You will also find Beech, Sycamore, Rowan, holly, Alder and ash trees. Over 60 different species of birds have been recorded in North Dean Wood. Some are resident all year, some are summer visitors arriving in spring and leaving in autumn and a few are winter visitors. A wide range of plant life can be found, from mosses, liverworts and lichens to the mighty trees and some fungi, which offer a varied and colourful display, especially in the autumn. The many flowering plants include Heather, Bilberry, Wood Sorrel and Bluebells. Wildlife in North Dean can be difficult to observe, with many of the residents being nocturnal and the remainder keeping well hidden even when active during the day. Most often seen are rabbits and squirrels. Foxes and Stoats may also be seen although both are largely nocturnal . Smaller mammals such as Shrews, Voles, Mice and hedgehogs are present, but seldom seen. Frogs, Toad and Newts can be found in the wettest areas of the Wood. The visible rocks in North Dean Wood are from the Upper Carboniferous Period (formed about 250 million years ago). The rocks belong to the Millstone Grit Series. The valley floor is covered with a thick layer of gravel and sand, deposited in the Late Glacial Period when, as the ice melted, vast quantities of water flowed into what is now Calderdale through the gaps at Waldsden and Cliviger. On top of this gravel is silt deposited by the River Calder, on which the plant cover grows. There are regular bus services from Huddersfield and Halifax bus stations to Greetland.
  5. Spring Hall Athletics Track

    Halifax

    Spring Hall Athletics Track

    Spring Hall Athletics Track has hosted numerous events including Calderdale Schools Athletics Championships, Young Athletes League meeting and Scho...
    Spring Hall Athletics Track has hosted numerous events including Calderdale Schools Athletics Championships, Young Athletes League meeting and School Sports Partnership Festivals. The track is open to the public and is available for casual use (track only) and for formal bookings from clubs, schools and other organisations. Opening hours are subject to bookings. It is advisable that users check Regular track bookings or contact the facility to check availability. Bank Holidays: please contact facility during this period for reduced opening hours.
  6. Willow Valley Golf

    Brighouse

    Willow Valley Golf

    Willow Valley Golf - Yorkshire's largest golfing venue. Boasting three course and 48 holes.
    Willow Valley Golf - Yorkshire's largest golfing venue. Boasting three course and 48 holes.
  7. Stoodley Pike Monument

    Todmorden

    Stoodley Pike Monument

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The...

    The 121 foot (37 m) high Stoodley Pike Monument dominates the skyline above Todmorden, sitting atop Stoodley Pike, a 1,300-foot (400 m) hill The monument was designed in 1854 by local architect James Green, and completed in 1856 at the end of the Crimean War.

    The monument replaced an earlier structure, commemorating the defeat of Napoleon and the surrender of Paris. It was completed in 1815, after the Battle of Waterloo, but collapsed in 1854 after decades of weathering and a lightning strike.

    You can only reach the Pike on foot, as there is no vehicular or bicycle access to the monument. Stoodley Pike is accessible by well-defined Right of Way footpaths. The Pennine Way also passes Stoodley Pike. There are many walking routes to the Pike from Todmorden, Hebden Bridge and Mytholmroyd. Walking guides to all these routes available from local Visitor Centres and the Heart of the Pennines online shop.

    Stoodley Pike Monument contains a spiral staircase of 39 steps, accessed from its north side. If you visit, please be aware that several of the internal steps are in darkness, so it’s useful to have a torch to light your way, as there are no windows. The entrance to the balcony is on the Monument’s west face, some 40 feet above ground level. The views are well worth the walk and the climb!

  8. Calder Homes Park, Hebden Bridge

    Hebden Bridge

    Calder Holmes Park

    Calder Holmes Park is a green open space, close to Hebden Bridge town centre. The park has an outdoor gym, a skateboard park childrens’ pl...

    Calder Holmes Park is a green open space, close to Hebden Bridge town centre. The park has an outdoor gym, a skateboard park childrens’ playground and is home to Park Life Cafe.

    There are some short flat tarmac paths to walk on and you can combine this with walking on the adjacent canal towpath and watch the narrowboats slip by.

    The park hosts a variety of events throughout the year such as the Hebden Bridge Handmade Parade.

  9. Sowerby Bridge Swimming Pool & Fitness Centre

    Sowerby Bridge

    Sowerby Bridge Swimming Pool & Fitness Centre

    Sowerby we offer a wide range of state of the art Technogym equipment, designed with the Wellness system to motivate, encourage and simplify your t...
    Sowerby we offer a wide range of state of the art Technogym equipment, designed with the Wellness system to motivate, encourage and simplify your training. Our swimming pool is great for both recreational and fitness purposes. Having both shallow and a deep end it makes it accessible for young, old, able bodied and disabled customers alike to use our pools. Our exercise studios have semi-sprung floors and air conditioning and are the perfect place to lose weight, tone up, get healthy and have fun.With so many enjoyable exercise classes on offer, you'll be spoilt for choice.
  10. Halifax Sailing Club

    Halifax

    Halifax Sailing Club

    Halifax Sailing Club is based at Warley Moor Reservoir (also known as Fly Flats) in Calderdale, West Yorkshire. We welcome dinghy sailors, windsurf...
    Halifax Sailing Club is based at Warley Moor Reservoir (also known as Fly Flats) in Calderdale, West Yorkshire. We welcome dinghy sailors, windsurfers and have arrangements for other organisations to use our facilities.
  11. The Pennine Way

    Todmorden

    The Pennine Way

    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of England and offers 268 miles of the ...
    Steeped in history, the Pennine Way National Trail chases along the mountain tops along the rugged backbone of England and offers 268 miles of the finest upland walking in England. A once in a lifetime experience. The Pennine Way enters Calderdale at Blackstone Edge, passing Stoodley Pike, dropping down into the valley at Callis, climbing back up to Colden and over the moors to Widdop. Walkers often say this stretch of over 20 miles is one of the best on the whole route. The Trail is very well way-marked and there are some great views from the route (especially from the iconic Stoodley Pike). If you want to detour into Hebden Bridge on your way, you can use the Hebden Bridge Loop path developed in 2015.
  12. Pennine Bridleway & The Mary Towneley Loop

    Across Calderdale

    Pennine Bridleway & The Mary Towneley Loop

    The Pennine Bridleway runs for 205 miles (330km) from Derbyshire to Cumbria. The Bridleway runs roughly parallel with the Pennine Way, but offers ...
    The Pennine Bridleway runs for 205 miles (330km) from Derbyshire to Cumbria. The Bridleway runs roughly parallel with the Pennine Way, but offers access for Horse Riders, Cyclists and Walkers. The Mary Towneley Loop is a 47 mile section of the Pennine Bridleway with a variety of tracks, looping past Blackshaw Head, Heptonstall, Hebden Bridge Todmorden, Walsden where you will encounter open moorland and hidden reservoirs, ancient packhorse tracks sweeping into valleys with gritstone walls, mill chimneys and canals offering a both a glimpse of past histories.

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