Hardcastle Crags & Gibson Mill

Adventure & Leisure, Cafes & Tea Rooms, Culture & Heritage, Family, Pet Friendly, The Calderdale Way, Walking, Walking Friendly, Weddings & Celebrations, Wildlife & Nature : Hebden Bridge

Hardcastle Crags & Gibson Mill
Free
Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the country. Gibson Mill is situated within Hardcastle Crags woodland beside Hebden Water.

The National Trust have put in some superb waymarked walking routes suitable for all abilities. Cross the river on stepping stones and spot birds, insects, amphibians and if you're lucky; deer! You'll find Hardcastle Crags offers a completely different experience throughout the year - from the icicles of midwinter to the carpet of bluebells in the spring.

The early 19th century Gibson Mill is situated within the site. A tour of the mill tells the history of the valley and the mill over the past 200 years. The mill also has changing exhibitions throughout the year.

Gibson Mill is 100% self-sufficient in energy, water and waste treatment. It has a hydro-electric system, solar photovoltaic panels and a log-burning stove fuelled by wood from the estate.

You can also rest and recharge at the Weaving Shed Café, serving delicious ethical and locally-produced food and buy the perfect gift or memento in the shop located there.

Built in around 1800,Gibson Mill was one of the first mills of the Industrial Revolution. The mill was driven by a water wheel and produced cotton cloth up until 1890. In the early 1900s, Gibson Mill began to be used as an ‘entertainment emporium’ for the local people. After the Second World War, the mill slipped into disuse, and was acquired by the National Trust in 1950.

Hardcastle Crags is open all year round from dawn until dusk, admission to Hardcastle Crags and Gibson Mill are FREE.

Dogs are welcome (including in the café and mill) if kept under close control.

GETTING THERE

You have three options to get to Hardcastle Crags:
By car - there is parking at Midgehole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AA) and Clough Hole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AZ). A parking fee applies at both car parks, although parking is free for National Trust members

By bus – the 906 runs from Hebden Bridge on weekends between May and October. It will take you to both the bottom and the top of the valley.

Walking – there is a route from Hebden Bridge on good paths with a bit of road walking. It will take you about 45 minutes. Pick up a guide from Hebden Bridge Visitor Centre.


See below for details of the wildlife you can discover at Hardcastle Crags.
Want more information?
Call 01422 844518 or visit www.nationaltrust.org.ukhardcastlecrags
Description

Details

The mixed woodland at Hardcastle Crags is managed to encourage natural regeneration of native broadleaved species. Fallen trees and standing deadwood are left to provide habitats for invertebrates, birds and bats.

This ancient semi-natural woodland is a mixture of native broadleaf trees (including oak, birch and alder) and planted areas of beech and pine. A rich variety of plant life can also be seen, with species such as great woodrush, bilberry, bluebell, wood sorrel and climbing corydalis.

Species-rich hay meadows can be found high on the valley sides, close to the Widdop Road. The meadows are cut in late summer after the plants have flowered, allowing the seed to be collected. Types of birds and insects commonly found on meadows include the skylark, twite, meadow pippet, and various types of beetle.

Mill ponds from a past industrial age now provide aquatic habitats for invertebrates, fish, amphibians and birds. The fast flowing streams of Hebden Water and Crimsworth Dean Beck flow through Hardcastle Crags too.

Roe deer are the largest mammals found here and are easily recognised by their characteristic white rumps. The valley is also home to eight species of bat, including pipistrelle, whiskered, Natterer's and noctule.

Herons, dippers and wagtails can often be found by the river. Rarer birds such as the green woodpecker, redstart, grey wagtail, bullfinch, willow warbler, wood warbler and song thrush can also be seen around the site.

Many invertebrates are associated with decaying wood, so Hardcastle Crags provides an ideal home for a number of significant species, including fungus beetles, rove beetles, moths and ants. See how many you can find.

Lichens and bryophytes (liverworts, mosses and hornworts) thrive in this area because of the high humidity in the deep valleys. There are also numerous fungi, with over 400 species noted by local naturalists.






More Information

Additional Information

Short Description Hardcastle Crags encompasses deep rocky ravines, tumbling streams, oak, beech and pine woods and some of the best examples of upland meadows in the country. Gibson Mill is situated within Hardcastle Crags woodland beside Hebden Water. The National Trust have put in some superb waymarked walking routes suitable for all abilities. Cross the river on stepping stones and spot birds, insects, amphibians and if you're lucky; deer! You'll find Hardcastle Crags offers a completely different experience throughout the year - from the icicles of midwinter to the carpet of bluebells in the spring. The early 19th century Gibson Mill is situated within the site. A tour of the mill tells the history of the valley and the mill over the past 200 years. The mill also has changing exhibitions throughout the year. Gibson Mill is 100% self-sufficient in energy, water and waste treatment. It has a hydro-electric system, solar photovoltaic panels and a log-burning stove fuelled by wood from the estate. You can also rest and recharge at the Weaving Shed Café, serving delicious ethical and locally-produced food and buy the perfect gift or memento in the shop located there. Built in around 1800,Gibson Mill was one of the first mills of the Industrial Revolution. The mill was driven by a water wheel and produced cotton cloth up until 1890. In the early 1900s, Gibson Mill began to be used as an ‘entertainment emporium’ for the local people. After the Second World War, the mill slipped into disuse, and was acquired by the National Trust in 1950. Hardcastle Crags is open all year round from dawn until dusk, admission to Hardcastle Crags and Gibson Mill are FREE. Dogs are welcome (including in the café and mill) if kept under close control. GETTING THERE You have three options to get to Hardcastle Crags: By car - there is parking at Midgehole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AA) and Clough Hole (for Sat Nav use HX7 7AZ). A parking fee applies at both car parks, although parking is free for National Trust members By bus – the 906 runs from Hebden Bridge on weekends between May and October. It will take you to both the bottom and the top of the valley. Walking – there is a route from Hebden Bridge on good paths with a bit of road walking. It will take you about 45 minutes. Pick up a guide from Hebden Bridge Visitor Centre. See below for details of the wildlife you can discover at Hardcastle Crags.
Type Adventure & Leisure, Cafes & Tea Rooms, Culture & Heritage, Family, Pet Friendly, The Calderdale Way, Walking, Walking Friendly, Weddings & Celebrations, Wildlife & Nature
Location Hebden Bridge
Address Hollin Hall, Crimsworth Dean, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, HX7 7AP
Phone Number 01422 844518
Web Address www.nationaltrust.org.uk/hardcastlecrags
Recharge Point No
Location & Map

Hardcastle Crags & Gibson Mill

Hollin Hall

Crimsworth Dean

Hebden Bridge

West Yorkshire

HX7 7AP

Accessibility

To ensure we offer impartial advice we have provided a link to  ‘Euan’s Guidewhere you'll find detailed access information to many venues across Calderdale and the UK: accommodation, attractions, shops, pubs, restaurants and more.  

VisitEngland lead training provider and contributor in accessible tourism, Visits Unlimited is a Calderdale-based national operator offering a range of accessibility-related services across the UK and abroad.  Visits Unlimited support businesses in not only meeting legal obligations stated within the UK Equality Act 2010 but in exceeding customer service expectations for all customers including those with specific needs.  Services provided include accredited hospitality training and disability awareness training, access auditing, mystery shopping and strategic accessibility planning. 

Places to stay nearby